Unicyclist Community

Go Back   Unicyclist Community > Unicycling Discussion > General Unicycling Discussions

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rating: Thread Rating: 447 votes, 4.98 average. Display Modes
Old 2004-05-17, 04:27 PM   #136
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
Oh, no, he's a clown, too!

CIRQUE ELOIZE'S ONE-WHEELED WONDER

roberta T. vowell THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT
485 words
11 May 2004
The Virginian-Pilot & The Ledger-Star
FINAL
E1
English
Copyright (c) 2004 Bell & Howell Information and Learning Company. All rights reserved.

HE IS A DANCER, sliding and leaping, pulling his partner close and then spinning away.

So his partner is a unicycle. When Bartlomiej Soroczynski hits center stage during a performance of Cirque Eloize, he's still a dancer.

"There's a first time for everything," Soroczynski says of his act. "It's like a dance. I establish a connection. I perform for a woman, who sits onstage, so it's a seduction number. There's also a bit of humor.

"It's something you've never seen before. I guarantee."

Cirque Eloize (pronounce it Sirk El-WAHZ) performs tonight and Wednesday at Norfolk's Chrysler Hall as part of the Virginia Arts Festival.

The show is akin to another Quebec-based, and better-known, show, Cirque de Soleil. The troupe performs on a theater stage with a live minstrel band. There's a certain intimacy, reinforced by the plotline of this tour, "Nomade," which involves a night journey through dreamscapes.

This is familiar ground for Soroczynski, whose parents were also circus performers.

"They were hand-to-hand acrobats," he said in a telephone interview from a Pittsburgh tour stop.

"My father gave me a unicycle, and I had my first performance at age 5. I'd come in at the end of the act with the unicycle, and I'd bow with them."

Soroczynski is 23. His friends call him "Bart."

He loves dance, particularly the tango, and jazz - Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Art Tatum, Wynton Marsalis.

His act incorporates all that, plus a huge dose of technical ability on the unicycle.

"The composer mixed together jazz and tango . I love social dances, tango, swing, flamenco. I love to observe movement.

"I don't want to show a trick. I'm using the trick to express what I feel. That's what makes it flow and what makes it seem easy."

Along with his unicycle act, Soroczynski pops in and out of the show as a clown.

"You go out and get to speak to the people, see what they think . You're free. There's structure but a lot of place for improvisation. The challenge is in trying to move the audience, and they are different every day.

"You know, sometimes I think they are saying, 'Oh, no, here come the clowns. Make me laugh.' Because there are a lot of bad clowns. Not everyone likes the clowns.

"It's kind of like throwing yourself in front of lions every night. I like that feeling."

Reach Roberta T. Vowell at 446-2327 or roberta.vowell pilotonline.com

Caption: Graphic WANT TO GO? What: "Nomade," by Cirque Eloize When: 7:30 tonight and Wednesday Where: Chrysler Hall, Norfolk Tickets: $15 to $45, students half price Call: 282-2800 COLOR PHOTO COURTESY OF VIRGINIA ARTS FESTIVAL Bartlomiej Soroczynski of the Cirque Eloize
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2004-05-17, 04:30 PM   #137
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
ONE-WHEELERS ARE BLAZING A NEW TRAIL

DEB ACORD Colorado Springs Gazette
827 words
13 May 2004
Seattle Post-Intelligencer
FINAL
12
English
Copyright (c) 2004 Bell & Howell Information and Learning Company. All rights reserved.

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.

Extreme mountain biking, extreme snowmobiling. Extreme skateboarding and in-line skating. Motocross and skiercross and all the other 'crosses.

They're so yesterday.

At least for Aaron Dubois, a teenager who has all those old, tired extreme sports beat. Dubois has embraced a sport that's so cutting edge, so new, so X, he appears to be only one of a handful in the state to master it.

Dubois is a "municyclist," a relatively new word for the relatively new sport of mountain unicycling.

Several times a week Dubois pedals a shiny but scarred unicycle up and down rugged trails favored by downhill mountain bikers. On a recent sunny morning, he took to a rough, rock-strewn hillside dotted with spiky yucca and withered cacti.

Municycles, like the one Dubois rides, have knobby tires, big saddles and mountain bike pedals. Like all unicycles, they have no gears and no way to coast. The rider pedals constantly. One rotation forward takes him forward the length of one rotation of the wheel. If he stops pedaling, the municycle stops.

So municycle riders are always pedaling, uphill and down. With one hand gripping the horn of the oversized seat and the other arm outstretched for balance, the rider moves in jumps and starts, continually adjusting for balance.

Speed isn't the issue. At unicycle races, according to the Unicycling Society of America, 17 mph is a common speed for the 100- meter winner; 14 mph for the 1,600 meter and 11 mph for a 10K. Dubois figures he rides about 2 mph on trails.

That doesn't mean you can't get anywhere on a municycle. Just ask Ed Hansen of Florence, Colo. Hansen, 30, is a corrections officer who has ridden a municycle since February.

He used to explore trails on a mountain bike. Now, he rides a municycle with his mountain biking friends.

"If it's really smooth and straight and they can use their gears, they leave me in the dust," he says. "But if it's rough, technical stuff and we're going downhill, we go the same speed. If we're going uphill, I can even pass them sometimes."

Like Hansen, Dubois has learned the power of a municycle - but it took a while. Dubois is 14 and home-schooled. A fan of science fiction, a "true believer" in aliens and an avid model builder, he has tried skateboarding and extreme in-line skating and snowboarding, and is proficient at downhill mountain biking.

On a whim last Christmas he asked for a unicycle. When he got it, he spent a few weeks in his driveway trying to learn to ride it. "There was about a week when I gave it up. It was hard to learn," he says.

But he couldn't resist the shiny one-wheeled bike, so he worked on it until he could ride it.

Dubois left the driveway for a dirt hill near his house, and soon graduated to trails in his Cheyenne Mountain neighborhood.

He discovered that balance was crucial, and that unicycling, especially the mountain variety, can take its toll on his legs.

"But in some ways, it's easier than riding a bike. There's only one wheel to worry about, and it's always a thrill."

Now, Dubois seeks out the perfect day on his municycle: a sunny, warm, T-shirts-and-shorts kind of day. His regret? "That I don't have somebody to do it with me."

The hardest part of perfecting the municycle, Dubois says, has been coping with his peers. Kids called him "circus freak" when they saw him riding on one wheel.

That's a common reaction to the unicycle, which, for generations, has been associated with the circus.

But that may be changing. Municycle events and clubs dot California and elsewhere. Web sites such as the one run by municycle pioneer John Foss, unicycling.com, detail events and provide news about the exploding sport. The North American Unicycling Championships last summer in Minneapolis attracted 350 unicyclists.

Unicycles even have taken on Moab, Utah, considered the mecca of mountain biking. Ed Hansen met other muni-minded athletes at last year's Moab MUni Fest, held each summer since 2001 on the slickrock near town. At MUni Fest, Hansen says, the versatility of the municycle becomes obvious.

"It's a blast on the slickrock. It's amazing how steep a hill you can go down or up without slipping."

Hansen believes municycling has a place in the future of outdoor recreation. "I feel like it's where mountain biking was 20 years ago. Not many people are doing it, but it's catching on."

MOUNTAIN UNICYCLING

Photo; Caption: MARK REIS/THE GAZETTE: Mountain unicyclist, or "municyclist," Aaron Dubois, 14, pedals a trail near his home in Colorado Springs, Colo. "It's always a thrill," he says.
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2004-05-17, 06:58 PM   #138
zod
Southern Fried mUni
 
zod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: North Carolina
Age: 44
Posts: 1,170
Send a message via AIM to zod
Let me add to the collection, here's an article about me from a few months ago....

http://www.charlottemag.com/buzz/story.cfm?ID=166

===========================================

On a Wheel and a Prayer
A local thrill-seeker hits mountain bike trails with only half a bike

By Sam Boykin; Charlotte Magazine

It just doesn't look right. There's this guy, and he's sitting on a bicycle seat attached to one wheel, and his arms are kind of flailing. But it can't be a unicycle, can it? This guy is riding on a rough, dirt path-a mountain bike trail. Who in their right mind would take a unicycle-with no brakes and a wheel that only spins when you peddle it-out on a dangerous trail like this?

Josh Taylor would, and he does.

While riding his mountain bike early last year, Josh Taylor aggravated a case of carpal tunnel syndrome in his wrist. The injury forced Taylor to park his bike for several months. So what's a sidelined adrenaline junkie to do without full use of his arms? Simple, take up the new sport of mountain unicycling. Also known as "mUni," it's just what it sounds like-riding a unicycle-or "municycle"-on the rugged, rock-and-root-strewn terrain of mountain bike trails.

The sport originated in the United Kingdom in the late 1980s, and eventually made its way into the United States, where it's still relatively unknown. Taylor, thirty, is among just a handful of intrepid (some might say crazy) folks in the Charlotte area who mUni at local trails, including Beech Spring (also called Poplar Tent), PeeWee's Mountain Bike Park in Lincolnton, and North Mecklenburg Park in Huntersville.

After his wrist injury, Taylor somehow convinced his wife to buy him a unicycle for Valentine's Day. "It just seemed like something fun to do," he says. "Plus, I thought it might help my overall ability in mountain biking."

Taylor practiced in his driveway, holding on to a chair for balance. After a few days he was able to go about twenty feet without falling. "At first it feels so alien when you put your butt up on the seat and there's no handlebars," says Taylor, who lives in Gaston County. "It is hard, but anybody can do it. You just have to put in the practice." And Taylor insists that there's a far greater chance of getting hurt while riding a mountain bike than a unicycle. "When you fall off a unicycle you can usually just step off and run away from it," he says.

Taylor became adept at maneuvering his unicycle in the driveway and on the sidewalk. Then, while surfing the Internet, he discovered mUni, and he shelled out about $400 for a municycle (they can cost as much as $1,500). Different from "freestyle" unicycles-the kind typically ridden by street performers and circus clowns-a municycle is sturdier, with fat knobby tires, a big saddle, and mountain bike pedals. Once he hit the trails, Taylor discovered that the bumps and uneven terrain provided a far different riding experience than his driveway.

"It was almost like starting all over again," Taylor says. "Every trail is a new learning experience. On a mountain bike it's all about blasting down the trail and just plowing over everything. mUni, on the other hand, is like a slow dance on a tightrope. You learn every root and rock. It's 100 percent concentration at five miles per hour. Plus, I have to admit, the shock value is kind of fun. Everyone I pass on the trail is a little freaked out."
zod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2004-05-24, 10:54 AM   #139
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
Moab transcript.

Mountain Unicycling

1,241 words
18 May 2004
Voice of America Press Releases and Documents
English
CY Copyright (c) 2004 Federal Information & News Dispatch, Inc.

Radio Scripts - English Feature 7-38648

Moab, Utah

_

INTRO: The pursuit of the extreme is one of the latest trends in American sports. Whether it's skiing down slopes you can only get to by helicopter[degrees] kayaking down waterfalls[degrees] or climbing up sheer cliffs that have never been scaled before, athletes are constantly trying to 'push the envelope.' In the new sport of Muni (MEW-nee), riders must use intense concentration and superb balance as they navigate up and down steep rocky slopes. Charles Michael Ray takes us Mountain Unicycling.

TEXT: It's a windy day on the high desert of central Utah... the spring sun has melted the last bit of winter snow off the smooth sandstone ridges and the rugged desert terrain rolls on to the horizon in every direction.

AUDIO: CUT 1 CROWD AMBI Start to fade up and under

TEXT: A large crowd is gathered on one of the steep slopes of crimson sandstone. Many are wearing helmets and protective body armor. At their sides, they hold tough-looking beefed-up unicycles. This is the 2004 Moab Muni Fest. With 135 riders, it is the largest mountain unicycle event in the world to date. And one of the main contests is just beginning...

AUDIO: CUT 2 EVENT ORGANIZER

The Cliffs of Insanity is next! Any expert riders, come this way if you want to take part in the Cliffs of Insanity! The Cliffs of Insanity is starting now.

AUDIO: CUT 3 AMBI pedaling and people walking and talking (use as bed throughout as needed)

TEXT: Someone would have to be insane to try to ride up this ten-meter slope. The sandstone is broken by a rough series of steps and ledges[degrees] the bottom ledge drops off into a sheer twenty-meter cliff with a patch of cactus and pine trees below. The riders mount their unicycles.

AUDIO: CUT 4 EVENT AMBI

OOOO!!! AHAAAAA!!! Crunch boink boink boink (unicycle falling down slope) Applause

TEXT: These unicycles are very different from those typically seen at a circus. They have extra-wide tires and reinforced frames that have been designed to take this kind of abuse, even if the riders cannot.

AUDIO: CUT 5 EVENT AMBI

CHINK -- OOOOO Aaaaa

TEXT: Only one contestant makes it up the first series of treacherous leaps, safely traverses back across the slope and then finally completes a careful set of hops and pedal strokes to reach the top of the Cliffs of Insanity.

AUDIO: CUT 6 EVENT AMBI

silence - hop hop hop. UGHHH - HURAHAA!! ALL-RIGHT! HUGE APPLAUSE

TEXT: This is Kris Holm, multi-time world champion, owner of his own line of specially outfitted mountain unicycles, and one of the pioneers of the sport known as Muni.

AUDIO: CUT 7 HOLM

Even though it's sloping and it's pretty smooth there's always irregularities in the rock and you really want to position your tire precisely in each of them and you can never be to greedy because if you're greedy you slip. You just incrementally work your way up the slope.

TEXT: The best Muni riders can jump off 3 meter ledges with ease, leap over a one and a half meter obstacle, and hop across a 3 meter gap. They can ride on virtually any terrain -- but they do so rather slowly... at about the pace of a rapid jog. Kris Holm says Mountain Unicycling is more like rock climbing than mountain biking, in that it takes intense concentration to stay on top of the wheel.

AUDIO: CUT 8 HOLM

Because of the precision involved it's a practice-oriented sport. You can have a great time on an easy trail or you can push yourself technically on the same hard terrain that mountain bikers use.

TEXT: The sport of Muni got rolling in 1996, when about 35 riders gathered in the foothills of California's Sierra Nevada Range for a weekend of unicycling through the back country. Since then, the sport has seen steady growth with the number of participants roughly doubling each year. California computer programmer John Foss organized that first Muni-Fest and is recognized as one of the sport's founding fathers. Foss says it's the challenge that draws many to off-road unicycling.

AUDIO: CUT 9 FOSS

Unicycling seems to attract people who like stuff that is hard. People who like to work at tough things. If you ask these people what they do for jobs or what they do in school, you'll find a lot of people who excel, or work with computers or who invent things and so it attracts an interesting crowd of people.

TEXT: Even though it's been around for less than a decade, many of the sport's biggest challenges have already been met -- including riding through parts of the tallest mountain range in the world. Mountain Unicycle enthusiast Nathan Hoover spent several weeks in 2002 crisscrossing the Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan with world Champion Kris Holm. They hiked up to remote monasteries in steep mountain passes and rode down the treacherous and ancient paths into secluded valleys. Hoover says the chance to travel by unicycle is part of what draws him to this sport.

AUDIO: CUT 10 HOOVER

I just like the way you can take your unicycle anywhere in the world, very easily. I like the way it's a little bit different. You get noticed. When you're traveling in foreign countries or anywhere it's instant passport to talk with people. And they come flocking up to you, and that's just a great thing.

TEXT: Hoover, who works for a California software company, says one reason unicycles are rarely seen is that not many people have learned to ride them. It takes an average of fifteen hours to master riding a unicycle just 10 meters without falling off.

AUDIO: CUT 11 HOOVER

You can get on a skateboard and do something right away, you can get on a bike and do something right away. Whereas a unicycle's gonna take, I don't know -- how good are you? Hours, weeks, months, to get going at all and then to do what people are doing here in the mountains. And then to do what people are doing in the mountains took me months to be able to go at all.

TEXT: While the learning curve for Mountain Unicycling is fairly steep, more and more people are taking the challenge. Retailers say the demand for off-road unicycles has grown dramatically in recent years and gatherings like the Moab Muni Fest are becoming more popular each year. World champion Kris Holm says it feels good to be at the top of an emerging sport.

AUDIO: CUT 12 HOLM

It's a really rare opportunity to be at the beginning of a sport and to get a chance to develop some of the techniques that even now people are taking for granted basically. And that's an exciting time. It's always the coolest part of any sport, I think, when it's really grassroots. You know everybody that's involved and you see a sport that you believe in grow and get bigger and bigger.

TEXT: Kris Holm's next adventure is to ride his unicycle down several peaks in the Andes Mountains of South America. For Main Street, I'm Charles Michael Ray in Moab Utah
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2004-06-01, 12:40 PM   #140
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
This opinion piece has nothing to do with unicycling, but employs a curious and relevant rhetorical device. I never thought a columnist would so capture the essence of me.

Whatever it is, I blame those Jewish plotters;Comment;Opinion

Jonah Goldberg
807 words
29 May 2004
The Times
25
English
(c) 2004 Times Newspapers Limited. All rights reserved

HERE we go again. It is time to blame the Jews. That seems to be this month's explanation for the Iraq war. Obviously, this is hardly a new idea on either side of the Atlantic, particularly for readers of, say, The Guardian or Le Monde. But in America, the emphasis on the theory has reached almost French proportions.

Ear-lier this month the retiring senator for South Carolina, Fritz Hollings, insisted that President Bush went to war "to secure Israel" and "take the Jewish vote from the Democrats.".....

.....American liberals were divided and -surprise -so were American liberal Jews and American liberal unicyclists. Of course, little of this will sway those who believe in Jewish conspiracies precisely because the lack of evidence is always the best proof for the male-volent genius of Jewish conspiracies. After all, that's what makes the Jews "the Jews".
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2004-06-07, 10:51 AM   #141
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
One wheel, and a lot of faith; Olathe man will roll across Kansas on his unicycle for a cause

By NOEMI HERRERA The Kansas City Star
735 words
6 June 2004
The Kansas City Star
1
6
English
Copyright (c) 2004, The Kansas City Star. All rights reserved.

Using only one wheel and good old determination, 33-year-old Troy Calkins of Olathe plans to roll across Kansas in eight days.

If he succeeds, he will become the first person to unicycle across the state, he said.

"They think I'm nuts. They really think I'm crazy," Calkins said. "A lot think it's not possible. But it's very doable."

Calkins will make his 489-mile trip during the 30th Annual Biking Across Kansas, which began Saturday at the Colorado border near Sharon Springs, Kan., and ends June 12 at the Missouri River in Leavenworth.

His motivation comes from the desire to raise awareness for esophageal and breast cancer, and money for research efforts.

His late uncle, Rex Lewellyn, died in 1999 of esophageal cancer, but the ride is also in celebration of his mother-in-law, Judy Blackburn, who survived breast cancer after a successful surgery in 2002.

He said much of his family has been affected by cancer.

"My uncle had prostate cancer, my grandmother had lung and brain cancer. Everybody's been touched by it," he said.

From the doubtful minds of fellow bicyclists to the friendly jibing from his co-workers, Calkins is aware of the skepticism his one-wheeled feat has drawn, and he understands. "There's no gears, no coasting on a unicycle. I have to peddle every bit of the way," said Calkins, a software developer who learned to ride a unicycle in grade school. "Yeah, I'll be tired. But that's the neat part of it; people with cancer can't just quit. For me, the week after I'm done, the fatigue will go away."

Jeff Nace, Calkins' co-worker, is on the fence about whether Calkins will complete the course.

"We've been making bets as to whether he'll make it," Nace said. "I've worked with him for the past few years. He's a positive guy, and he's determined."

Talk around the office is that Calkins will give up Sunday or Monday. Sunday is the first 80-mile leg of the race, he said.

He said he started training, swimming and lifting weights every day six months ago in preparation for the trek. He even purchased a new 36-inch wheel for the journey, an upgrade from the more common 20-inch unicycle.

Long-distance unicycling is becoming a fad, he said. A couple of people have done it in other states, including Iowa.

While bicycles can go as fast as 20 miles per hour, Calkins said unicycles go about 10 miles per hour. Because of that, he expects to arrive about four to six hours behind the other cyclists as they go from town to town.

Adding to the skepticism is Calkins' inexperience.

"I've never done something like this before, not even on a bicycle," he said.

But, according to the Biking Across Kansas Web site, www.bak.org/index.php, many participants are first-time riders with varying levels of ability.

Most riders even make stops along the way to shop, tour a museum, enjoy the vistas or visit historical roadside markers.

Calkins' plan is to stop every 10 miles to give his body a rest.

"My butt will hurt, my legs will hurt," he said. "My legs might fall asleep and other things may fall asleep, but I can stop after an hour and get started again. ‘No' is negative. People will cheer us on and that's what will push me too. I will will it to happen."

To reach Noemi Herrera, Olathe education reporter, call

(816) 234-7729 or send e-mail

to nherrera@kcstar.com.

To donate

Visit www.unicyclekansas.com.

The donation button is set up so money will deposit directly to the Kansas City Stowers Institute for Medical Research.

People may also write a check or send money orders to the attention of Sherry Russell, administrative assistant at the Stowers Institute, 1000 E. 50th Street, Kansas City, MO 64110. Write Calkins' name or ‘Unicycle Kansas' on the memo line.

Troy Calkins of Olathe begins his ride across Kansas this weekend. He will ride his 36-inch unicycle in the Bike Across Kansas ride. CHRIS OCHSNER/The Kansas City Star
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2004-06-07, 10:54 AM   #142
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
No wobbles for mayor's big wheel.

225 words
5 June 2004
Coventry Evening Telegraph
3
English
(c) 2004 Coventry Newspapers Ltd

THE Mayor of Nuneaton and Bedworth is gearing up for tomorrow's one-wheeled cycle ride from Bedworth town centre to Nuneaton town centre.

Cllr Ian Lloyd - possibly the country's only unicycling and juggling mayor - has been in training for months at Cannons Health Club in preparation for his stunt.

He will be raising cash for his adopted charity Mencap, for which he hopes to raise £60,000 to install a lift at the Nuneaton HQ at Chetwynd House.

The ride will begin outside the Tesco store in Leicester Street, Bedworth at 10am, where Mencap members will be holding an all-day collection.

It will follow a nine-kilometre route to end at Asda in Newtown Road, Nuneaton, where Mencap members will be selling prize draw tickets.

The have-a-go mayor will be accompanied on his mission by young members of Nuneaton Juggling Club, who will be riding unicycles in relays.

Cllr Lloyd said: "The members of Mencap face and overcome big challenges in their everyday lives and so I decided to beat this challenge and at the same time raise money for this much-needed lift."

He hopes to bank £1,000 with his ride and he is inviting local people, businesses and organisations to sponsor him by phoning Trevor Walters on 024 7674 4154
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2004-06-07, 11:40 AM   #143
andrew_carter
Back into muni!
 
andrew_carter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Age: 32
Posts: 5,242
What a great mayor. Do you think the members of the juggling club are only doing the 9km ride in relays so the mayor isn't upstaged?

Andrew
andrew_carter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2004-06-08, 12:46 PM   #144
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
Unicyclists head North for annual conference

237 words
7 June 2004
Newsquest Media Group Newspapers
English
© Copyright 2004 Newsquest Digital Media.

the North East

UNICYCLISTS from across Britain came to the region yesterday for their annual conference.

The three-day event began last night with more than 250 unicyclists holding a unicycle celeidh dance.

Other events to be held at the convention at St Michael's RC Secondary School, in Billingham, will include the British Unicycle Hockey Championships.

The 11th annual convention has been organised by the Stockton Unicycle and Juggling Club and this is the first time it has come to the North-East.

Roger Davies, of Stockton, whose Internet-based unicycle supply business is the largest in Europe, is one of the organisers.

He said: "We've got people coming from the length and breadth of Britain but I'm disappointed we're not getting more. After all, it's only once a year.

"We've organised a few things and I'm looking forward to getting them to cycle over to Guisborough where we can do some mountain riding and have off-road trials on our unicycles.

"My favourite event, though, is the hockey and it's great just to meet up with people and have some laughs."

The convention ends tomorrow evening. Previously, it has been held in Birmingham, Leeds, Cardiff, Edinburgh, North Wales, Kidderminster and Exeter.

Anyone interested in joining the Stockton Unicycle and Juggling Club can call Mr Davies on his work number (01642) 361203.
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2004-06-10, 02:53 PM   #145
Borges
Unicyclist
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Ringsted, Denmark
Age: 41
Posts: 1,405
Improve your horseback riding by improving your balance

Article in the Swedish magazine "Häst Liv" (Horse Life)


... skipping to the unicycle part ...

<translation>
To ride a unicycle is an exercise out of the ordinary. But for those who dare, it's a great exercise. You're forced to keep your balance without holding on to anything, which is great practice for not, by reflex, to grab e.g. the bridle and thereby tug at the horses mouth. On a unicycle you even get a good understanding of the way you give the horse signals by shifting your weight. Even the slightest shifting of the weight from one sit bone to the other will make the unicycle react. The same is the case for the horse, tiny, tiny changes are enough to make your signals reach the horse.

</translation>

Cykla enhjuling är en övning lite utöver det vanliga. Men för den som vågar är det en bra övning. Du tvingas hålla balansen utan att hålla i något, vilket är bra träning för att inte reflexmässigt vilja ta tag i t.ex. tyglarna och rycka hästen i munnen. På en enhjuling får du även en bra förståelse för vikthjälpernas inverkan. Det minsta du lägger vikten på ena eller andra sittbenet så förflyttar sig cykeln. Detsamma gäller ju för hästen, det räcker med små, små hjälper för att dina signaler till hästen ska nå fram.
__________________
What happens on the internet stays on the internet.
Borges is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2004-06-16, 12:43 PM   #146
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
Unicyclist puts up good effort in trip across state

By NOEMI HERRERA The Kansas City Star
549 words
16 June 2004
The Kansas City Star
1
4
English
Copyright (c) 2004, The Kansas City Star. All rights reserved.

"It was one of the most physically challenging things I've ever done in my life."

Though 60 miles short of becoming the first unicyclist to roll across the width of Kansas, Troy Calkins said the experience was incredible and worth the sore muscles.

"It was very taxing on the body and a mind game in afternoon," said the 33-year-old Olathe resident who participated in the 30th Annual Biking Across Kansas last week.

From Sharon Springs, Kan., near the Colorado border, to Leavenworth, software developer Calkins gave it his all during the 489-mile, eight-day trip through Kansas in the name of cancer awareness.

He said it was Mother Nature who put a monkey wrench in his goal of pedaling through the state on one wheel.

"I made it every day except three," he recounted, describing the heat and winds as unbearable on some days. "We had 100 degree temperatures and 30- to 40-mile-per-hour winds on some days. They were the most grueling days we all had."

He wasn't the only one to "SAG out." SAG is a term used for the support vehicle that drives cyckusts to the next resting point if needed.

On one particular windy day, there was a large majority of bikers who did not finish the leg, he said.

Nevertheless, while he cannot say he completed the course on his own leg power, the experience was amazing.

He had a chance to speak about his cause for cancer awareness to all the cyclists during a gathering.

"Everybody was talking about it," Calkins said. "Every day, 700 people would pass me on route and say ‘good morning,' or say ‘keep up the good work.'

But when the faster cyclists passed him, the afternoons turned long and lonely, making the ride a test of his dedication.

He said, all along the way, it was the encouragement and stories of cancer he heard along the way that kept him going.

"Some were calling me a hero and that I am an inspiration to them," he said.

Other cyclists shared their stories with Calkins – some told him about their loved ones' fight with cancer and some said they themselves were living with it.

He said he must have heard about 20 or 30 cancer stories, including one man who approached Calkins with a story of his late wife who died of cancer. He also thanked Calkins for his effort.

"I was touched by how many people cancer has touched," he said. "It was more than I ever expected."

He said the journey was an accomplishment, despite the SAG outs.

"The whole experience was a success," he said. "I would most likely not do it again on a unicycle. It would be so much fun on a bicycle."

To donate

Visit www.unicyclekansas.com and click on the donation button. Money donated online will deposit directly to the Kansas City Stowers Institute for Medical Research. People may also write a check or send money orders to the attention of Sherry Russell, administrative assistant at the Stowers Institute, 1000 E. 50th Street, Kansas City, MO 64110. Write Calkins' name or ‘Unicycle Kansas' on the memo line.
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2004-06-21, 11:03 AM   #147
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
OY! Sorry, can't find the picture.

Caption only: COMMUTER VEHICLE

39 words
19 June 2004
Guelph Mercury
Final
C6
English
Copyright (c) 2004 Guelph Mercury.

CAPTION

Photo: TYLER BROWNBRIDGE, GUELPH MERCURY / Dean Graham, 36, owner of Trend Hair Design at the University of Guelph, gets around campus on a new unicycle. He calls the bike a "new toy".
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2004-06-21, 12:24 PM   #148
GILD
Waffle-Tosser, Time-bider and JCTK
 
GILD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: the bustling metropolis of Nelspruitia, south africa
Age: 50
Posts: 16,278
Quote:
Originally posted by JJuggle
He calls the bike a "new toy".
OY! indeed

is that like the worst sentence in the history of english or what?!?



GILD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2004-06-23, 12:42 PM   #149
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
Note: Admittedly marginal, but read down. - R

Man mounts a pedal protest; When gas went up, he quit driving to work

BY MARSHA LOW
FREE PRESS STAFF WRITER
613 words
22 June 2004
Detroit Free Press
0
English
(c) Copyright 2004, Detroit Free Press. All Rights Reserved.

MASON

He rolled his black touring bike from the back of Darrell's Market & Hardware, through the fluorescent glow of the frozen food aisle and into the parking lot.

With his helmet snapped in place, Dennis Berger leaned over to slip two rubber bands over his Wrangler jeans to keep the grease from the chain at bay.

He hopped on, scanned for traffic and began to pedal quickly down a two-lane country road toward home.

On June 1, regular gasoline in Mason jumped to $2.10 a gallon. That's when Berger parked his Chevy Silverado and began biking to work.

It's his small way of protesting high fuel prices, and the state's failure to establish mass transit or safe biking paths, Berger said.

"This is not a money issue because it's only a mile to work, so I'm not saving that much on gas," said Berger, 50. He is director of the grocery store. "This is about saying no. This is about rebellion."

Berger is not alone.

Lucinda Means, executive director of the League of Michigan Bicyclists in Lansing, has noticed an increase in the number of people pedaling to work, to play and to run errands as the price of gasoline began its upward climb in May.

"The price of gas, at least anecdotally, is affecting people's behavior," Means said. "Essentially, people are saying with gas prices the way they are, biking could be a fun alternative. People have to burn energy to get to work, and it's healthier for them to burn their own energy."

Within the last week, gasoline prices have dropped to around $1.87 a gallon for regular. But economists are predicting that prices will rise again after attacks to a major oil pipeline in Iraq halted exports last week.

The uncertainty is only working to strengthen Berger's resolve to continue biking into the fall.

On a recent Wednesday afternoon, thunderstorms loomed in the distance as Berger explained his history with the bicycle.

Before moving to Mason from St. Clair Shores a decade ago, Berger made it a habit to drive to the nearest bike path, where he would take long rides after work. Nearly four years ago, he paid $1,200 for his Trek touring bike and began statewide trips that had him rolling 80 miles a day.

For Berger, a 5-minute ride to work is an afterthought.

Still, the trip down Aurelius Road does have pitfalls: cars to contend with, potholes that threaten, weather that turns ugly.

And on occasion, a mocking coworker.

"Everybody thinks it's funny," said Jessie Schlehuber, 21, a cashier at the grocery store. "With gas prices the way they are, I don't blame him for riding his bike. But we still all joke about it."

All but Alan Bungart, 38, the store's meat manager -- who rides his unicycle to work.

If coworkers have anything to say about Berger's protest, he hasn't noticed.

What he has noticed is what people in town have dubbed "Cheap Tuesday."

Along Cedar Street, gas stations drop their prices every Tuesday as much as 15 cents, Berger said.

"It makes no sense," said Berger, who says it now costs $50 to fill his tank. "Why don't they keep prices like that all the time then?"

Instead, Berger will limit errands to once a week and continue riding his bike to work.

Except when it rains. Then he drives.
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2004-06-23, 04:55 PM   #150
johnfoss
North Shore ridin'
 
johnfoss's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: El Dorado Hills, CA
Age: 56
Posts: 16,746
That's Michigan for ya. A guy rides a bike one mile to work and his co-workers think he's a crackpot. Another guy rides his unicycle and seems to get less attention. ??

Notice how reporters seem to keep inventing the word "municycle?" Are we feeding them this word? I never see it used here. Only the press uses it. I think they may assume it because we say "muni" and we say "unicycle" and they must just stick them together. I'll try to remember, in the future, to remind reporters that "municycle" is not a word. Of course MUni is...
__________________
John Foss
www.unicycling.com

"The miracle is this: the more we share, the more we have." -- Leonard Nimoy
johnfoss is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
articles, unicycle, wait


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 07:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2001-2016 Gilby
You Rated this Thread:
Page generated in 0.26292 seconds with 9 queries