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Old 2017-11-08, 07:52 PM   #16
Kiwi Earl
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Originally Posted by jaco_flans View Post
This is all you'll ever need for unicycle maintenance.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JtjcJbScZ8g
Mate, that is GOLD! Only a Kiwi could demonstrate this important information so perfectly
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Old 2017-11-08, 08:03 PM   #17
ScaredOldKid
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Originally Posted by tholub View Post

The second thing is that the bearing holders need to be snug but not tight; most people over-tighten them until they know better. I hand-tighten them, and then add another quarter or half-turn of the wrench.
The tightening of the bearing holders is my biggest question. Can I do as this person says or is a torque wrench needed and if so what torque? Thanks
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Old 2017-11-08, 09:17 PM   #18
Chimeara
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Torque Isis cranks

I hope this is not a dumb question, but how do you tighten an isis crank arm that is secured with an alllen bolt using a torque wrench?
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Old 2017-11-08, 09:35 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by ScaredOldKid View Post
The tightening of the bearing holders is my biggest question. Can I do as this person says or is a torque wrench needed and if so what torque? Thanks
I would not think you would need a torque wrench for bearing caps. The key is not to get them so tight that the wheel does not turn free. It is easy to spin the wheel to see if it is free and when tightening the bearing caps if it starts to drag, just back them off a little.

I've read that the torque spec is 45 in-lbs for bearing cap bolts. That is very low and many automotive type torque wrenches will not accurately measure it anyway.

Jim

Last edited by JimT; 2017-11-08 at 09:36 PM.
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Old 2017-11-08, 09:41 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chimeara View Post
I hope this is not a dumb question, but how do you tighten an isis crank arm that is secured with an alllen bolt using a torque wrench?
You can get 3/8" Drive Allen Sockets. Do a google search to see photos.

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Old 2017-11-08, 10:55 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by JimT View Post
I disagree that a torque wrench is not a recommended tool for maintaining cotterless crank connections. This is especially true for novice mechanics.
You may be right. For all you novice mechanics out there, if you feel the urge to buy a torque wrench, by all means do so. If you think it's too much to spend for tightening cotterless/square taper cranks, you'll be okay by following tholub's advice. I'm sure I messed up the tightness on a wheel or two back in the day (when the only two choices were cotterless and cottered), mostly this was not the case. With a normal-sized ratchet wrench handle, just tighten it real good; even better if you have just a slight amount of grease on the tapers first. More important is to test for tightness after the first ride, and from time to time after that. With practice you'll learn to feel when a cotterless crank is not tight.

If you're using splined axles (ISIS and other types), the rules are different. I don't own enough of those to offer advice here.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tholub View Post
The correct torque for a cotterless crank arm is, "As tight as you can make it with a normal wrench when sitting on the wheel."
Sitting on the wheel? I usually just roll the unicycle up to a wall, tree or other vertical thing, and work the wrench in the direction of that thing. When new to doing this, ride for a few minutes after tightening, and then tighten again to see if it turns any more. Repeat as necessary.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimT View Post
I would not think you would need a torque wrench for bearing caps. The key is not to get them so tight that the wheel does not turn free. It is easy to spin the wheel to see if it is free and when tightening the bearing caps if it starts to drag, just back them off a little.
The rules vary depending on the type of bearing cap. On cheaper unicycles, you will very often see a pressed-steel cap. These are found on the UDC Club and many others. See image below. The key thing for these is that the two halves of the bearing holder don't connect when you tighten the bolts; there is always a gap. So the amount of torque is important. Tighten a little bit past finger-tight, then spin the wheel. If it spins freely, tighten a bit more, and repeat. If the wheel slows down immediately after you stop pushing it, that's too tight, so make it looser. Repeat until you feel just a little bit of friction as the wheel spins.

The other type are machined bearing holders, which are usually solid metal. Some are designed to close until both sides are touching, and some not. So basically the rules are the same, but if the sides do close all the way, you can usually go a little bit tighter as long as the wheel still spins freely. Nobody likes to lose their bearing nuts/bolts!

Pressed steel bearing cap. Note the two halves don't touch when it's tight, so it's squeezing on the bearing:
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Last edited by johnfoss; 2017-11-08 at 10:58 PM.
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Old 2017-11-09, 11:03 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimT View Post
I've read that the torque spec is 45 in-lbs for bearing cap bolts. That is very low and many automotive type torque wrenches will not accurately measure it anyway.
They make torque wrenches for bikes, preset to 4 or 5nm (it's metrics, no idea what it is in imperial). Worth having one in the tool box as they don't break the bank.

Last edited by pierrox; 2017-11-09 at 11:04 AM. Reason: typoooooos
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Old 2017-11-09, 01:26 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnfoss View Post

The other type are machined bearing holders, which are usually solid metal. Some are designed to close until both sides are touching, and some not. So basically the rules are the same, but if the sides do close all the way, you can usually go a little bit tighter as long as the wheel still spins freely. Nobody likes to lose their bearing nuts/bolts!
Which maker is doing such cups? We had a discussion in the German forum about putting washers in between the cups in order to close the gap and being able to tighten bolts properly without squeezing the bearing itself. KH, Nimbus and Quax have a gap in their machined bearing holders.
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Old 2017-11-10, 04:03 AM   #24
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Thanks all. This is very helpful for me.

I don't think I saw bike stand mentioned.

Eventually I want to be able to use the unicycle for transportation, and some mounttain unicycling. What to take along for short, long rides?
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Old 2017-11-10, 04:42 AM   #25
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This has been covered before but the main things are a 5mm allen key for saddle height and bearing cap adjustment, a pump, tyre levers and patches.

In my pack I also carry a 4mm allen key for adjusting my handlebars and a spoke key. I also carry a spare tube if I'm going far on my 36, as it uses a Foss tube which can fail in strange and unpatchable ways.

I don't bother carrying a pedal wrench or crank tools because they're heavy and bulky and I rarely ride more than an hour or two from home. If I had a serious mechanical failure then I'd just call my wife to come and collect me .

One other thing I carry is some basic first aid supplies to treat road rash. It's let me ride home in an injured state without having to walk or call for a lift.

Obviously if I was doing something like a long, multiday, unsupported ride then I'd pack more comprehensively.
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Old 2017-11-10, 07:05 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by Up Rite View Post
Thanks all. This is very helpful for me.

I don't think I saw bike stand mentioned.

Eventually I want to be able to use the unicycle for transportation, and some mounttain unicycling. What to take along for short, long rides?
A multi-tool (the Alien is my favorite) is the basic thing.
Tire levers if your multi-tool doesn't include them (or if it can't really get your tire off).
A patch kit.
A pump (Lezyne is by far the best)

That's really all I have on a day ride. Maybe, maybe a spare tube if I'm doing MUni, but MUni tubes are really heavy. I often have a spoke wrench but that's just because they're light, you can get by on the trail without one.
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Old 2017-11-10, 10:40 AM   #27
pierrox
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For my usual town rides, I take:
- allen wrenches, 4mm and 5 mm (saddle and handle bars)
- some change, preferably banknote (lighter than coins)
- credit card (in case I need to buy something more substantial)
- City Bike card (in case of a flat tire so I can ride home on a bike with the uni in the panier!)
- water and chocolate bars, but those are not uni tools.

For a longer ride, especially out of the city, I'll add a pump, tire patches (glueless), and tire levers.
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Old 2017-11-10, 02:11 PM   #28
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Do people really use a torque wrench for (non-schlumpf) ISIS cranks? I just get a massive wrench and push down until it stops turning I also put a bit of grease on the spline so I can remove it with just as much ease in future.
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Old 2017-11-10, 02:20 PM   #29
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when playing around with my 29er I bring nothing, the bottle is attached to the uni and I'm never extremely far away from home.

When taking my G36 it's another story. on my camelback I have:
2 L water bag.
hex keys (2 for schlumpf button and its other special tool,4,5,6 for schlumpf cranck bolt)
digital manometer
mini pump
emergency pump in case of flat.
FOSS spare 36er tube (29er tube is in the tire)
tire levers
15mm key for the pedals
my phone, some energy stuffs to eat

I will take the same stuffs if I plan to go far away with my 29er, except the tools I need for the schlumpf hub and the 36er tube.
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Old 2017-11-10, 03:27 PM   #30
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Do people really use a torque wrench for (non-schlumpf) ISIS cranks? I just get a massive wrench and push down until it stops turning I also put a bit of grease on the spline so I can remove it with just as much ease in future.
Yes, I'd bet that some do use a torque wrench on ISIS cranks. Engineers and manufactures do recommend torquing the fastener to a specific torque for the best performance, but what do they know?

Here is a blurb on why they recommend a specific torque:
(from http://www.isisdrive.com/isisdrive/faq.htm )

What are the consequences of using too much or too little pre-load?

If a crankarm has too much pre-load it will not bottom out against the crank stop on the spindle when initially installed. This will lead to the crank arm “walking” up the taper during some initial rides and a consequent loosening of the crank bolt. If the bolt is not constantly tightened until the crank finally contacts the stop, the result could be the crank falling off while riding or damage to the interface.

If the crankarm has too little pre-load it will bottom out on the crank stop prior to attaining a press-fit with the spindle. Depending on the magnitude of the press-fit, this may result in anything from a slight reduction in the load carrying capability of the interface to a “sloppy” fit between the crank and bottom bracket. This may also lead to creaking of the interface due to the slightly “sloppy” fit between crank and spindle.


With all that said my gut feeling is that the ISIS connection has enough reserve strength and has proven to be quite reliable that if the torque is not exactly as specified, you would likely be just fine.

Jim
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