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Old 2017-11-26, 12:03 PM   #16
pierrox
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I'm also great in bed!
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"Let's have sex!" and found beside me every model or actress I decided.
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"let's have sex!" temptation, especially at first
Whoa what's happening to this forum, I came here to read about unicycling, not about your sex life!

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Old 2017-11-26, 01:46 PM   #17
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Yep. I'm usually really really good in my dreams, gliding almost as if freewheeling. Then I wake up.
same for me: unicycling dreams are great and I can perform lots of tricks I am unable to do in real life .... that's why I sleep a lot! (8-10 hours every night!)
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Old 2017-11-26, 04:28 PM   #18
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I frequently dream I'm unicycle riding. They are great dreams, because I'm always riding flawlessly and effortlessly. I've had freewheel uni dreams as well, which have made me want to try one. In general, I think they make me a better rider, because I want to go out afterwards and duplicate what I dreamed.
Yeah I think uni dreams come especially while trying to tackle a new trick. Then in the dream it just works. I love to be able to glide, which I dreamt about, but I don't even dare to take off 1 foot off the pedals.
It is the same with computer games where there is a mission that you try many many times and just doesn't work and then during the night I dream I made it, only to wake up realising it wasn't real.

As for slipping off the pedals, I have that right before falling asleep, giving some muscler spasms. I think that is totally normal, either tripping over your feet or slipping of the uni. Whatever your mind is full with.
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Old 2017-11-26, 05:35 PM   #19
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I am still just dreaming about how to ride these things properly.

Otherwise my sleeping dreams would make for original movies and video games.
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Old 2017-11-27, 02:41 PM   #20
elpuebloUNIdo
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but I don't even dare to take off 1 foot off the pedals
I suggest, for learning anything one-footed, that you first practice static mounts slowly, gradually increasing the interval of time between the placement of the first and second foot. Then, try to let the second foot hang in the air during the static mount, so you're doing a one-footed still-stand. Another thing you can try is, while idling, work on making the idles big, and at the point the dominant foot/pedal is back and pushing hard to change direction, slightly lift your non-dominant foot off the pedal, just for a moment. Both these exercises will get you accustomed to removing a foot from the pedal, and they help you find the correct position, in the 360 degree pedal stroke, to make the transition from two footed riding to one footed riding. Also, it may be easier to learn one-foot idling, with a foot on the crown, before learning one-foot riding. You might try static mounting into a one-foot idle.

Back to dreaming: I recall that the dreams can go in slow motion. I think this is so our brain can analyze a hard part of our technique. When I dreamed I was wheel walking, when I attempted to transition back to the pedals (this is my next big stumbling block), that part happened very slowly. I think I failed in the dream because I don't have any real concept how to transition back. Even in my dreams, there was some reality.
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Old 2017-11-27, 04:16 PM   #21
song
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When I dreamed I was wheel walking, when I attempted to transition back to the pedals (this is my next big stumbling block), that part happened very slowly. I think I failed in the dream because I don't have any real concept how to transition back. Even in my dreams, there was some reality.
Well, before you get lost in magic realism, try slowing down your wheel walk. Actually, you can wheel walk at any speed you like, but at the moment you return to the reality of the pedals, it helps to be approaching a standstill.

For me, that means going from riding to taking six steps on the tire, then back to riding. By that sixth step, I have slowed way down, and my left pedal is (hopefully) approaching the forward horizontal position. I step on it, quite forcefully if necessary, and bring the other pedal smacking into the sole of my right foot. Then I become an axolotl and ride off into the Pampas.
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Old 2017-11-28, 12:56 AM   #22
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Thanks, song, for the wheel walking advice. I might try to glance down at my pedals to see if they're in position after six foot-pushes. The idea of doing it without looking...is a bit freaky. I remember, in my dream, I put my feet down, I couldn't see, and I was struggling to feel the pedals. I'll keep you posted on my progress.
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Old 2017-11-29, 08:04 PM   #23
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My unicycle dreams a rare, cool, and a tiny bit frustrating as what I'm doing in the dream is something I wish I could do (gliding, freewheeling, one foot riding), but is beyond my current abilities. They do, however, inspire me to learn!
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Old 2017-11-30, 05:25 AM   #24
elpuebloUNIdo
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After dreaming about wheel walking 50 feet, I was disappointed to return to reality based practice, yesterday, when I was lucky to ww 10 feet. I read somewhere, maybe on the forum, that the "think" method only works when there's an adequate amount of related knowledge. For example, you're an accomplished musician and have to learn a different instrument. You might make some progress thinking about playing the new instrument. I thought a lot about unicycling when I was a beginner, but that didn't stop me from regressing from the end of one session to the beginning of the next. When I was not quite a beginner any more, on one day I would practice a mount 50 times, only landing it on the 50th try...then, on the next day, I would land the mount on the first try. This suggests, to me, that some learning occurred while thinking about unicycling. But, for that to happen, I needed enough knowledge about unicycling to construct an adequate model of whatever technique I was learning. And the only way I could get that knowledge was to accidentally, randomly do the right thing by landing the mount on the 50th try. There are some beginners on the forum who have been politely accused of over thinking unicycling. I think the implication is that, for beginners, there are too many "unknown unknowns" to expect that over-thinking unicycling is going to help. You just have to experience it. As a beginner, when I randomly did something right, allowing me to ride a bit farther, I would think about how it "felt" when I had a good run. It was hard for me to "know" what I did right. I made assumptions, but many of my assumptions were later proved wrong. So, long story short, to answer my own question, whether or not dreaming about unicycling helps in learning, I suppose it depends. Maybe for emerging techniques, dreaming helps. If I dreamed about gliding, however, which is something I'm not even close to being able to do, I'm not sure that dreaming about it would help me learn any faster. Before ever trying it, I dreamed that I put my feet back on the pedals while wheel walking. Yesterday, I attempted putting my feet back in real life, and I fell on my ass. I suppose that not knowing much about wheel walking means that thinking about it, dreaming about it, may not improve my technique. Nevertheless, dreams can be motivating.
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Old 2017-11-30, 08:44 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
After dreaming about wheel walking 50 feet, I was disappointed to return to reality based practice, yesterday, when I was lucky to ww 10 feet. I read somewhere, maybe on the forum, that the "think" method only works when there's an adequate amount of related knowledge. For example, you're an accomplished musician and have to learn a different instrument. You might make some progress thinking about playing the new instrument. I thought a lot about unicycling when I was a beginner, but that didn't stop me from regressing from the end of one session to the beginning of the next. When I was not quite a beginner any more, on one day I would practice a mount 50 times, only landing it on the 50th try...then, on the next day, I would land the mount on the first try. This suggests, to me, that some learning occurred while thinking about unicycling. But, for that to happen, I needed enough knowledge about unicycling to construct an adequate model of whatever technique I was learning. And the only way I could get that knowledge was to accidentally, randomly do the right thing by landing the mount on the 50th try. There are some beginners on the forum who have been politely accused of over thinking unicycling. I think the implication is that, for beginners, there are too many "unknown unknowns" to expect that over-thinking unicycling is going to help. You just have to experience it. As a beginner, when I randomly did something right, allowing me to ride a bit farther, I would think about how it "felt" when I had a good run. It was hard for me to "know" what I did right. I made assumptions, but many of my assumptions were later proved wrong. So, long story short, to answer my own question, whether or not dreaming about unicycling helps in learning, I suppose it depends. Maybe for emerging techniques, dreaming helps. If I dreamed about gliding, however, which is something I'm not even close to being able to do, I'm not sure that dreaming about it would help me learn any faster. Before ever trying it, I dreamed that I put my feet back on the pedals while wheel walking. Yesterday, I attempted putting my feet back in real life, and I fell on my ass. I suppose that not knowing much about wheel walking means that thinking about it, dreaming about it, may not improve my technique. Nevertheless, dreams can be motivating.
I come back with the Lucid Dreaming subject cause it's used by some sportsmen to enhance their trainings and their results.

See this article. From the German Psychologist Paul Tholey.

I resume his thesis there:
Thesis 1: Sensory-motor skills which have already been mastered in their rough outlines can be refined by using lucid dreaming.

Thesis 2: New sensory-motor skills can be learned using lucid dreaming.

Thesis 3: Sensory-motor actions can be perfected by test runs carried out in a lucid dream state.

Thesis 4: The flexibility of an athlete’s reactions can be substantially improved by varying body movements in lucid dreams.

Thesis 5: Lucid dreaming can also be used for practicing mental movements which make sensory-motor learning easier.

Thesis 6: Lucid dreaming can be used for improving the organization of the phe-nomenal field with respect to the execution of sports movements.

Thesis 7
: By changing the personality structure, lucid dreaming can lead to im-proved performance and a higher level of creativity in sports.


I remind that "Lucid Dreaming" means: dreaming while knowing that your are dreaming.
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Old 2017-12-01, 02:38 AM   #26
song
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Before ever trying it, I dreamed that I put my feet back on the pedals while wheel walking. Yesterday, I attempted putting my feet back in real life, and I fell on my ass.
As I said, when the first pedal you're going to step on arrives at the right position, you've got to be going really, really slowly- so slowly that if you stayed at that speed for more than a second or two, you would lose your balance.

This is what worked for me when I first learned to return to the pedals, and it is what works for me now, though it could change- it already has slightly. At first, if that front pedal wasn't at a point just above 3 o'clock, all was lost. Now, if it's anywhere between 1 o'clock and 5 o'clock, I can usually get it, though I have to adapt slightly. If the pedal is close to 5 o'clock, I have to just barely touch it and shift my weight backwards to catch the other pedal, but if it's at around 2 or 3 o'clock, I sometimes have to give it a good stomp. The other pedal then joins my other foot with an audible smack, and the wheel is then back under me, restoring my balance. Reaching for that first pedal was never too much of an issue, it was reaching for the second one that really felt like a leap of faith until I had done it a few times.

If I take a longer walk than the standard 6 steps, I have to plan my return to the pedals several steps in advance. I have to know where the pedals are, and slow my walk down so that I'll be grinding to a halt just as they come into position.

I have never had a dream about unicycling -lucid or otherwise- that I can recall, but it definitely does help to think about some of this stuff, visualize it, explain it to others and so on.
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Old 2017-12-01, 05:44 AM   #27
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As I said, when the first pedal you're going to step on arrives at the right position, you've got to be going really, really slowly- so slowly that if you stayed at that speed for more than a second or two, you would lose your balance.
I don't think it needs to be quite that sketchy, but you are accurately describing the general situation on returning to pedals.
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At first, if that front pedal wasn't at a point just above 3 o'clock, all was lost. Now, if it's anywhere between 1 o'clock and 5 o'clock, I can usually get it, though I have to adapt slightly.
If you keep working at it, it will continue to get easier and will matter less and less where the pedals are.
[/quote]If I take a longer walk than the standard 6 steps, I have to plan my return to the pedals several steps in advance. I have to know where the pedals are, and slow my walk down so that I'll be grinding to a halt just as they come into position.[/QUOTE]Back when I did tons of Freestyle riding, mostly in gyms (which have a nice, predictable riding surface), I got to where I didn't even need to look down; I could feel where the pedals were. While I never really perfected that technique, it was always great when it worked. Mostly I would just do a little glance down. Once you see where the pedal is, you can calculate (with practice) the movements to get your feet onto them. Kind of like in juggling; if you can see where the ball peaks, your brain can fill in the rest of the arc and tell your hand where to meet it, even if you've closed your eyes.

Unicycling dreams:
I've definitely had some. I remember some where I did stuff that I'd never seen done in reality, but were tricks or techniques that should be learnable. Like going from the seat to a sideways wheel walk, to walking the wheel behind the seat (seat in front) to sideways walking on the other side of the uni, and back to the seat for a complete 360. I'm sure there are a bunch of people out there who can do that now if they want to practice it.

In recent years, unicycle-related dreams seem to have been more about arriving at Unicon and not being ready to compete, not having trained, showing up last-minute with no time to put the unicycles toghether, losing track of all my stuff, etc. More typical of dreams in which people worry. But now that I'm less competitive at the conventions, those have faded as well. Less pressure and more fun!
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Old 2017-12-02, 04:32 PM   #28
elpuebloUNIdo
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Thank you, johnfoss and song for further explaining wheel walking. I will practice slowing to a virtual halt...before attempting to put my feet on the pedals. Just like beginner riders, my tendency is to speed up throughout the course of the wheel walk. The frustrating thing about the transition back to the pedals is that failed attempts are going to land me on my ass. Reminds me of the sketchy falls I had as a beginner. This is not true of most failed attempts at other techniques, where a UPD lands me on my feet.

I am pretty good at a variety of jump mounts, but all of them are landed with the seat in front (or behind), in my hand(s), rather than under my bottom. If a jump mount fails, seat out, I land on my feet. If a seat-in mount fails, I land on my ass. I have a similar feeling about the transition back to the feet during the wheel walk. Sketchy as hell...

I have a pair of tail bone protection shorts. I will put them on next time I practice wheel walking.
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Old 2017-12-04, 06:53 AM   #29
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Hmm, well, I still have never really had a bad fall from wheel walking in dry weather, though I'm sure John Foss is right that I would if I tried to wheel walk backwards. I don't have any scars from wheel walking, but I do have a little one from jump mounting without shin guards! I also don't have any of the jump mount-related skills that you have.

But yeah, learn to bring your wheel walk to a standstill when the cranks are approaching where you want them, and you should then find reaching for the pedals a lot less intimidating. You are right to compare this process to learning to ride all over again, but it takes a lot longer, or at least it did for me. It is definitely worth it, though.
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Old 2018-02-16, 07:00 PM   #30
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Dreamt last night I had a uni with a wheel about 30“ in diameter an about 8“ wide, like a large car tire. Tried to ride it on a dam with a grass track. Pedaling was very hard and there was no way to pick up speed to keep rolling.
But when I stopped, I didn‘t fall down. The wheel was wide enough to stay on top without waving my arms.
It would be interesting to know how such a wheel behaves in reality.
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