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Old 2002-06-12, 01:38 AM   #1
ChxWitBrix@aol.com
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saddle bags

Is there any real reason municyclers do not use the handy under the seat bags
moutain bikers use? I can see no reason a unicycle seat could not take one
of these, especialy if its one with the rail adapters. They come quite in
handy in the case of a pinch flat, or a seat knocked sideways, or whatever
happens. I cant imagine it would ever get in the way. is it just that
nobody has thought of this??

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Old 2002-06-12, 03:35 AM   #2
dustin
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Re: saddle bags

Quote:
Originally posted by ChxWitBrix@aol.com
Is there any real reason municyclers do not use the handy under the seat bags moutain bikers use? .... is it just that
nobody has thought of this??
Trevor andersen
Hey Trevor, it has been thought of...I use a Gary Fisher under seat bag on my road uni. It has a "Quick Cleat" attachment that makes it really simple to remove when I don't want it. This works great on the road, but I think it would shake around too much for my liking on a MUni.

I've considered getting another cleat to attach to my MUni, but I've found that I like to carry my gear and tools in my Blackburn Hydration pack. Lots of room in the pack for everything I've ever wanted on a ride and it reduces the weight of the uni making it easier to jump over logs and such. The back pouches on cycling jerseys are great for carrying stuff as well. I have a hunch most people go for these last two methods rather than the under seat bag.
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Old 2002-06-12, 04:14 PM   #3
Sofa
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Camelback wearer here. It blows away anything under the seat...one con...sweatty back. You can't go for a ride with a waterpack on, then run into say, a public shooping place, and not feel like a total loser.
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Old 2002-06-12, 09:26 PM   #4
billnye
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sweaty back?

gee, it must be nice to live in the sort of climate where "sweaty back" is an optional characteristic when one's been unicycling.

i swear, i'm not on the thing more than 45 seconds before i break a sweat, and it only gets worse from that point. i usually end my rides, however casual the terrain covered, looking as if i've been doused with a firehose [ask adam].

then again, if i minded being sweaty i'd be living somewhere else, right?

John M
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Old 2002-06-12, 10:03 PM   #5
Sarah Miller
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Re: saddle bags

ChxWitBrix@aol.com wrote:
> Is there any reason municyclers do not use the handy under the seat bags
> moutain bikers use? I can see no reason a unicycle seat could not take one


I used to use one, till it broke. With a standard miyata saddle with two
extra holes drilled in the rear bumper. I looped a cable tie through each
hole and used the loops to attach the bag straps to. It was a cheap bag
with straps not a rail clip type. It worked Ok, not much space but enough
for a punture kit and inhaler. Then on the South Downs way the stiching
gave out on the seat tube wrap and I nearly lost it.I havn't bothered with
one since.

That said. On the coker till recently I carried my lights large battery
in exatly the same way. Only the bag was better built with a much butcher
tube wrap. No problems. I only stopped coz I got a helmet mount for the
light and now the battery pack goes in my bag. I tried leaving it on the
uni but it was uncomfortable.

sarah

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Unicon 11 ~ Washington USA.~ July 25 - Aug 2 2002
The world unicycle convention and championships.
http://www.nwcue.org

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Old 2002-06-13, 01:18 AM   #6
ChxWitBrix@aol.com
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Re: saddle bags

In a message dated 6/12/02 4:05:26 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
dustin.648ha@timelimit.unicyclist.com writes:


> it has been thought of...I use a Gary Fisher under seat bag
> on my road uni. It has a "Quick Cleat" attachment that makes it really
> simple to remove when I don't want it. This works great on the road,
> but I think it would shake around too much for my liking on a MUni.
>
> I've considered getting another cleat to attach to my MUni, but I've
> found that I like to carry my gear and tools in my Blackburn Hydration
> pack. Lots of room in the pack for everything I've ever wanted on a
> ride and it reduces the weight of the uni making it easier to jump over
> logs and such. The back pouches on cycling jerseys are great for
> carrying stuff as well. I have a hunch most people go for these last
> two methods rather than the under seat bag.
>


Good, so its not just me. I did imagine it owuld shake a little to much, but
i figured, it does on a bike to, whats the difference? lots of bikers seem
to be going the camelbak route as well nowadays.
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Old 2002-06-13, 02:23 AM   #7
Joe
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Re: saddle bags

Here's a hurriedly-made QuickCam pic of how I mount a small undersaddle bag
(assuming AOL ever gets around to making it available)...

http://members.aol.com/ickyslug/seatbag.jpg

It's an Avenir bag that attaches to the saddle with a quick-release clip and to
the seatpost with a strap. The "male" part of the clip ordinarily is mounted
onto the rails of a bike saddle by screwing the two halves of its base together
with the rails clamped between them. Here I am using two of those little steel
doohunki, mending strips or whatever they're called, that are like
straightened-out angle-irons (hardware store vocabulary deficiency). The clip's
mounting clamp is assembled with the screws going through the holes in the
metal strips. The strips are bent into a relaxed "Z" shape, and the other ends
are held by the seat mounting nuts. You need to make the Z-bend so that the
bag's strap end is against the post, and there's grab-room between the saddle
and the bag. The bag can hold my wrench, multitool, little locking-cable, patch
kit, pressure gauge, a tiny air-pump and a few Band-Aids... My Sem's saddle has
another clip on it, so I can switch the bag from one to the other. I got the
bag a few years ago and I'm not sure whether they still make this type or not.
Other rail-mounted clips could probably be adapted in a similar way. It's easy,
solid and works pretty slick. I suppose you could mount another clip beneath
the front end too, and carry two bags.

- Joe



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Old 2002-06-13, 04:48 PM   #8
John Foss
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RE: saddle bags

> gee, it must be nice to live in the sort of climate where
> "sweaty back" is an optional characteristic when one's
> been unicycling.


I am fortunate to now live in California. But we still sweat here, though I
grant you it's probably less than in your undisclosed location. I think
humidity is a much bigger factor than heat in generating sweat. The
Sacramento area gets pretty hot, but our humidity stays fairly low.

> then again, if i minded being sweaty i'd be living somewhere else,
> right?


Moving out here was worth it for me, I love it here!

For MUni rides I use the Camelbak because it holds not only water, but a
bunch of the other stuff I need. And I know I'm going to be sweaty anyway.
But when I ride my bike to work (hey, it's 8 miles and I don't have all
day), I go for the water bottle. That way I have one less sweaty area when I
get here...

Stay on top,
John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone
jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com



IF IT DAMAGES PUBLIC AND PRIVATE PROPERTY,

SKATEBOARDING

AND UNICYCLING

IS A CRIME

(Mind where you grind)

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Old 2002-06-13, 05:03 PM   #9
Tom Holub
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Re: saddle bags

In article <mailman.1023985829.6883.rsu@unicycling.org>,
John Foss <john_foss@asinet.com> wrote:
)> gee, it must be nice to live in the sort of climate where
)> "sweaty back" is an optional characteristic when one's
)> been unicycling.
)
)I am fortunate to now live in California. But we still sweat here, though I
)grant you it's probably less than in your undisclosed location. I think
)humidity is a much bigger factor than heat in generating sweat. The
)Sacramento area gets pretty hot, but our humidity stays fairly low.

To be accurate, humidity is a factor in whether the sweat you produce
evaporates or not. You'll produce plenty of sweat riding through a
desert but you'll get wetter riding in a swamp.
-Tom
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Old 2002-06-13, 10:23 PM   #10
John Foss
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RE: saddle bags

> To be accurate, humidity is a factor in whether the sweat you produce
> evaporates or not. You'll produce plenty of sweat riding through a
> desert but you'll get wetter riding in a swamp.


Especially a deep swamp! :-)

I'm not sure about this, but I think humidity also makes you sweat more. We
sure sweated a lot in China, for instance. I don't think I come close to
sweating that much in drier air. Even though it's evaporating, I think I'd
notice that much fluid loss.

JF
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Old 2002-06-13, 11:43 PM   #11
unicus
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John Foss writes
Quote:
I'm not sure about this, but I think humidity also makes you sweat more. We
sure sweated a lot in China, for instance. I don't think I come close to
sweating that much in drier air. Even though it's evaporating, I think I'd
notice that much fluid loss.
As far as I was aware you sweat to cool down by the action of evaporation so if the humidity is high your sweat won’t evaporate very well so you just get hotter and sweat more, not good. Personally I look like it’s been raining regardless of the weather conditions

Gary

BTW John, if they are giving out prizes for the most words posted to Rec.Sport.Unicycling I think you may win, how do you do it?
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Old 2002-06-14, 07:51 AM   #12
billnye
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posting from an undisclosed location

merely a sin of omission, john, and a bit of mental unicyclist.com-centricity, since that's where i usually read all this. my location on unicyclist.com is listed as "sunny florida", and that comes up in the info next to all my posts. [Bradenton: west coast, between Sarasota and Tampa for the curious]

so yes, the discussion that followed regarding bogs and swamps is apropriate for our humidity levels, hehe.

i am both a fairly ready sweat-er, as moderate temperatures and/or any level of exertion are enough to get me started [and goodness knows unicycling down here has enough of both of those].

towelling off,
John M
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Old 2002-06-14, 02:28 PM   #13
Carl
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Re: saddle bags

in article mailman.1024005868.10033.rsu@unicycling.org, John Foss at
john_foss@asinet.com wrote on 6/13/02 5:23 PM:

> I'm not sure about this, but I think humidity also makes you sweat more. We
> sure sweated a lot in China, for instance. I don't think I come close to
> sweating that much in drier air. Even though it's evaporating, I think I'd
> notice that much fluid loss.


You are correct.

When the sweat is evaporating rapidly it's doing its job - that is cooling
the body. In more humid conditions sweat doesn't evaporate as fast, so it
doesn't cool the body as well. Since the body still needs to cool, it
produces more sweat.

If you'd care for any more humidity we've got plenty to spare (Chicago). We
went out for a bike ride last night, and the fog was rolling in before we
got back. Not only is sweat not effective in fog, but it's like breathing
soup.

-Carl

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Old 2002-06-14, 05:43 PM   #14
John Foss
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RE: saddle bags

> If you'd care for any more humidity we've got plenty to spare
> (Chicago).


No thanks, I grew up in Michigan... :-)

JF
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Old 2002-06-15, 05:52 AM   #15
scot
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If you and your uni can handle it, you can attach all kinds of stuff. On longer rides of 20 plus miles, I prefer to not have weight on my back. Hence the unibago was born. See the pic on the EUT website at:
http://www.outtech.com/Unicycle/EUT/...20Andy%27s.htm
Plenty of room for a cold beer and some Clif bars.

Stick with what works....
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