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Old 2014-08-27, 08:31 PM   #31
unibokk
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Hello UM. I notice in the video when you're mounting the 36er that your left pedal is very high as you step up. Just be careful that you don't tear your calf muscle. I would recommend having the left pedal much lower i.e., at four o clock as you step on . The higher the step the more pressure is put on the calf muscle.

Last edited by unibokk; 2014-08-27 at 08:39 PM.
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Old 2014-08-27, 11:33 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by unibokk View Post
Hello UM. I notice in the video when you're mounting the 36er that your left pedal is very high as you step up. Just be careful that you don't tear your calf muscle. I would recommend having the left pedal much lower i.e., at four o clock as you step on . The higher the step the more pressure is put on the calf muscle.
I hurt my calf muscle two weeks ago while doing an assisted mount! My first foot must have been too high? I had been riding for an hour in class then went to the local meet up. Just as I mounted I felt a really sharp pain in my calf. I barely made it back to my car and couldn't walk the next day without severe pain. Took just over a week to walk without a limp. Tennis players call it Tennis calf and runners call it a calf heart attack.
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Old 2014-08-28, 01:33 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unibokk View Post
Hello UM. I notice in the video when you're mounting the 36er that your left pedal is very high as you step up. Just be careful that you don't tear your calf muscle. I would recommend having the left pedal much lower i.e., at four o clock as you step on . The higher the step the more pressure is put on the calf muscle.
Do you mean my right calf? The one i kick off on. I don't think there is very much pressure on my left calf.

The higher my left pedal is, the more force I can put on that and less on my right calf.

I've never had any problems with this and I have done this type of mount a lot over the last 3-4 years.

But of course, when you mount a 36'er anything can happen including hitting a fence or a curious boy who is standing too close (the boy is fine).
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Last edited by UniMyra; 2014-08-28 at 01:34 PM.
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Old 2014-08-28, 03:59 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by Vertigo View Post
I hurt my calf muscle two weeks ago while doing an assisted mount! My first foot must have been too high? I had been riding for an hour in class then went to the local meet up. Just as I mounted I felt a really sharp pain in my calf. I barely made it back to my car and couldn't walk the next day without severe pain. Took just over a week to walk without a limp. Tennis players call it Tennis calf and runners call it a calf heart attack.
Hello Vertigo, I hope your calf heals up ok. When stepping up, I would suggest that you place the centre of your foot on the pedal and not the ball of your foot. Pressing down on the ball of your foot puts more pressure on the calf muscle. You would have noticed this as you tried to walk after hurting your calf.

In the video UniMyra's foot position looks to be very well positioned which means that his calf muscle is more relaxed and not so tight as he mounts.

It's just the height of the left pedal as he mounts the 36er, is very high.
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Old 2014-08-28, 04:20 PM   #35
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I've had my 36er for a couple of years now and after watching the video I decided to give that technique a try. Up until now I would mount the uni in a somewhat similar fashion, except that my "starting" pedal would be in a much lower position than what you see in the video. I also never thought of putting pressure on the pedal and seat the way that is described there.

After trying that out, I must confess that it is definitely superior to what I was doing, which resulted in more successful and easier mounts for me.

Thank you for posting.

Last edited by gathan; 2014-08-28 at 04:21 PM.
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Old 2014-08-28, 04:43 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by UniMyra View Post
Do you mean my right calf? The one i kick off on. I don't think there is very much pressure on my left calf.

The higher my left pedal is, the more force I can put on that and less on my right calf.

I've never had any problems with this and I have done this type of mount a lot over the last 3-4 years.

But of course, when you mount a 36'er anything can happen including hitting a fence or a curious boy who is standing too close (the boy is fine).

Hello UniMmyra, firstly let me say that I really enjoyed the video, it's very well made. Yes it was the left calf I was concerned about, but after watching your video a few more times I noticed that your left calf muscle looks quite relaxed.

Your left foot position on the pedal looks to be very accurate so that that there isn't too much pull on your calf. I think your height [about 186.69cm?] helps. It means that you can more easily get your whole foot over the pedal.

With the 36er pedal so high a smaller person might only be able to get the ball part of their foot onto the pedal causing the calf muscle to pull as the they step up. Also because the step up is higher for a smaller person they will find it more difficult to get the required trust from the right leg adding pressure to the left calf as the left leg tries to compensate for the lack of thrust generated by the right leg.

Having said all that, I know that you cant always cover every possible scenario that may arise when doing a tutorial. Ultimately it's up to each individual to decide what works best for themselves.

The roll into the fence added a nice bit of humour. lol!

Last edited by unibokk; 2014-08-28 at 04:45 PM.
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Old 2014-08-29, 06:22 PM   #37
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Thanks unibokk and gathan. I see your point about height unibokk. I have to admit that I didn't think about that.
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