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Old 2015-08-10, 05:09 PM   #16
Engineer on a Unicycle
Learning to say "on your left"
 
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Originally Posted by Jazamei View Post
There's someone here selling a 24" Torker DX for $225. Is that a good deal?
Nowhere near the bargain you got on your KH trials, but if in excellent condition it's not a terrible price if you precisely want a 24" unicycle with a big off-road tire. Otherwise it's not much below new price for something that may not be a better fit than what you have.

You could offer less. Worse they can do is angrily say no.

Where do you want to ride right now?

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I actually found that I don't like my feet sliding around... the damaged shins I can do without though!
You could keep the aggressive pedals but buy shin guards

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I only have a 30" inseam... but I'm going to double check. you should be actually sitting on the seat as opposed to hovering over it, right?
For efficient riding on flat surfaces (rather than tricks or lots of hopping) you want the seat to take your weight and allow your leg to be nearly straight when the pedal is down. You will probably be able to get there with the stock seatpost on most unicycles, unless you get one that someone already shortened or ordered with an extra-long seatpost (they can always be cut, or if necessary replaced).

Something I found was that just having the seat in the right position doesn't mean you will necessarily put weight on it - getting my weight onto the saddle and reducing the unnecessary effort in my legs has been a big challenge against which I'm slowly improving.
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Last edited by Engineer on a Unicycle; 2015-08-10 at 05:17 PM.
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Old 2015-08-10, 09:07 PM   #17
Engineer on a Unicycle
Learning to say "on your left"
 
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Originally Posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
With a 20", you're going to ride like a crazed banshee. You will ride smoother on a larger wheel. That doesn't make you a better rider on a larger wheel. Value process over product. The product of a big wheel may be a smoother-looking, less-jerky ride. Once you're up and riding, you'll look more competent on a larger wheel. But the credit for the smooth ride on a big wheel goes to the unicycle, not to you. The smaller wheel, every time it jerks to the left or right, that's an opportunity to learn how to steer. So, you may look like a fool on the 20", but you will be learning faster.
There's some surprising truth here. Just got back on my 20" after a weekend of feeling like I was building some real confidence on the 26", and amazed how, well, bad I am at being stable on the that squirrely little wheel.
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Last edited by Engineer on a Unicycle; 2015-08-10 at 09:09 PM.
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Old 2015-08-12, 11:55 PM   #18
unijav
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Good stuff posted here.
Newbie here too and I just picked up a 24" torker LX, I decided to go with a 24" because (well besides scoring it for $60) I figure this will likely ever be my only uni, and I've read a few folks say that once you get the hang of it, a 20 is not ideal unless your goal is tricks. i tried learning on a 20" cx years ago for a few days and i think i'm already further along in the couple hours of falling I've put on the 24 so far. I've heard people say a smaller wheel is easier to learn on but that hasn't been my experience so far, maybe because a smaller wheel can feel less 'stable' or more 'squirrely'?
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Old 2015-08-13, 01:40 AM   #19
Engineer on a Unicycle
Learning to say "on your left"
 
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Originally Posted by unijav View Post
I figure this will likely ever be my only uni
Ha! wanna buy a bridge... in Brooklyn?

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I've read a few folks say that once you get the hang of it, a 20 is not ideal unless your goal is tricks.
A 20" is definitely more suited to a focus on how you are riding or something you are doing while riding than it is to riding to somewhere.

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i tried learning on a 20" cx years ago for a few days and i think i'm already further along in the couple hours of falling I've put on the 24 so far. I've heard people say a smaller wheel is easier to learn on but that hasn't been my experience so far, maybe because a smaller wheel can feel less 'stable' or more 'squirrely'?
If a 24" is what you have, and you aren't feeling intimidated by it, then it's the perfect unicycle for you to be practicing on right now :-)

Really, it sounds like you got a lot of capability for a bargain price. Chances are if you stick with it you will buy others in the future, but right now you have something that's not too big to do interesting things, and not too small to cover short distances.
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Old 2015-08-13, 04:09 AM   #20
Jazamei
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Originally Posted by Engineer on a Unicycle View Post
Where do you want to ride right now?
Right now, I'm content to just ride in my driveway or in a school parking lot or playground. Eventually I'd like to see if I could do some off road Muni riding on trails but I think I need to develop better balance and control first. I'm still struggling to turn left or right but I hope that will come in time. Right now I can ride about 50' about 60-70% of the time. I figure, aside from turning, that I should learn to free mount and idle before attempting to go off road.

Here's a question, is there much of a difference between a 24" and a 26" uni? (Aside from the obvious 2" of course!). For those that have ridden both, which would you choose and why? Also, what type of riding do you do? Are these wheel sizes meant for different riding styles?

Last edited by Jazamei; 2015-08-13 at 04:10 AM. Reason: clarification
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Old 2015-08-13, 04:37 AM   #21
song
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It sounds like you are definitely at the point where you should sacrifice a little riding time so you can learn to freemount.

Idling is also good, but will come a bit later, especially if you ride a larger wheel. It was the first skill that I learned after riding and then mounting.

26 tires are much easier to find than 24. I always do most of my riding on a 20, and feel that if I'm gonna ride a larger wheel instead, the bigger the better...
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Old 2015-08-13, 01:12 PM   #22
elpuebloUNIdo
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Originally Posted by Jazamei View Post
I’ve been viewing the forums and the biggest tip that people say is Practice! Aside from that… does anyone have any other tips for someone that is just starting out?
  • Use protection; if you don't have them already, I think wrist guards are the most important bit of protective gear, followed by a helmet, then perhaps shin guards.
  • Find a curb which backs up to something you can hold onto with both arms outstretched; it may take some looking around to find this.
  • Learn what the proper techniques are for riding, mounting, etc., but don't be afraid to, in the short term, do what is working. You may need to ride with crappy technique before moving onto better technique.
  • Break down unicycling into many elements in your mind; this will help you measure your progress in many different ways and provide you with something to feel good about after each practice session.
  • Accept the fact that learning to unicycle is a never-ending process. The satisfaction of learning a particular skill, say riding forward, soon gives way to the realization that, for example, we still can't steer correctly.

Keep us posted on your progress!
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Old 2015-08-13, 02:18 PM   #23
OneTrackMind
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Originally Posted by Jazamei View Post
Here's a question, is there much of a difference between a 24" and a 26" uni? (Aside from the obvious 2" of course!). For those that have ridden both, which would you choose and why? Also, what type of riding do you do? Are these wheel sizes meant for different riding styles?
Depends how they are set up and where you are riding. I have both. (See my signature for details.) I have 125 cranks on both.

I set up my 24 with a narrow tyre making it very nimble but I have to be more careful with it on the rough. It doesn't do well on grass at all. My 26 has a wider rim and bigger volume tyre which is great for riding over rough stuff and grass.

However the 24 can go places I have not mastered with the 26 partly because of control on the steeper descents and partly because the narrower tyre on the 24 is less prone to autosteer on side slopes which really matters on the worst of the narrow steep winding footpaths (sidewalks) where I sometimes like to ride.

I mostly ride the 26 because I can go quite a lot faster and more places. If I was forced to choose I would choose the 26.

However a 24 with 125 cranks is a "standard unicycle" class for racing so it is good to have one set up with a light, narrow tyre if you want to compete. There are serious standard racing unis with tiny high pressure tyres built specially for racing but they are really unsuited to rough surfaces. My 24 is a good compromise for "standard" road riding.
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Old 2015-08-13, 05:08 PM   #24
markus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Engineer on a Unicycle View Post
Something I found was that just having the seat in the right position doesn't mean you will necessarily put weight on it - getting my weight onto the saddle and reducing the unnecessary effort in my legs has been a big challenge against which I'm slowly improving.
I just remembered how I worked on that problem. I used a mantra I think I learned from Alucard: BOS - Bum On Seat. Imagine your bum really, really heavy and sinking deep into that seat. I kept chanting that mantra while riding to force myself to focus on putting weight on the seat.

Now, a year later, I occasionally find having to do the opposite: When I approach a rough section with bumps and tree roots, I have to force myself to get off the seat and put more weight on the pedals so I can absorb the bumps and not lose contact with the pedals. Don't ask me how I found that out

You were also speculating about off roading. I'd say: Don't wait. Every little thing helps and giving a trail a go may help you with other things riding on pavement. Just don't pick something super technical or challenging. But a little dirt or gravel path through a park is a good thing to practice on.
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