Unicyclist Community

Go Back   Unicyclist Community > Unicycling Discussion > General Unicycling Discussions

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 2017-11-02, 04:21 PM   #31
Eric aus Chemnitz
Landesvertreter Sachsen im EVD
 
Eric aus Chemnitz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Chemnitz, Sachsen
Age: 31
Posts: 2,323
Quote:
Originally Posted by Up Rite View Post
I was looking into buying a previous generation new old stock, I think it might have that disc on it. Good on them for "disc"ontinuing it.
If you purchase one with the old saw-like rotor, you can swap out the rotor as they're not that expensive.
__________________
Einradfahren in Sachsen:
einradsachsen.com
f/EinradSachsen
28.05.2017: Europamarathon Görlitz
Eric aus Chemnitz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2017-11-02, 04:36 PM   #32
Up Rite
Unicyclist in training.
 
Up Rite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Wet Coast of the Great White North
Posts: 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric aus Chemnitz View Post
If you purchase one with the old saw-like rotor, you can swap out the rotor as they're not that expensive.
Good to know, thanks!
__________________
Unicycling is a Rite of Passage.
Up Rite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2017-11-02, 05:01 PM   #33
Up Rite
Unicyclist in training.
 
Up Rite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Wet Coast of the Great White North
Posts: 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric aus Chemnitz View Post
If you're searching for the evil, you will find it in everything.


Speaking of evil:


Just because I am searvching for the UN"hole"Y, does not mean I am searching for Evil, yet. Once I get good at this, then I will be looking for Evil Wicked, and Nasty places to ride off road. So bad, might have to send in the preacher to do an exorcism just to make it safe enough. I do live on the North Shore where God (Kris Holm) honed his unicycle skills and machinery after all.

__________________
Unicycling is a Rite of Passage.

Last edited by Up Rite; 2017-11-02 at 05:07 PM. Reason: added more
Up Rite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2017-11-02, 05:35 PM   #34
Up Rite
Unicyclist in training.
 
Up Rite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Wet Coast of the Great White North
Posts: 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by kunstrasen View Post
In our Muni group internal and external discs are used. All of the unis get flying around, same as the riders. I have not seen damaged discs or hurt ankles form the disc. Both versions work fine in practice. Choose what you like. As for the brake itself: A closed hydraulic system is almost maintenance free. Of course you will have to replace pads at a certain point, however that takes ages on a Muni.

For the rim I also do not like holes in them. There can be significant weight saving by making disc rims, as they do not need the thick sidewalls for the rim brake. This is what KH did on the new 2017 rims in 27,5 and 29 size (without holes). You can also check the MTB market for rims, however most of them are 32H (spoke holes) versions, while Munis typically have 36H.


Great to know about the KH 27.5 and 29! I missed that. Thanks!

My original plan was to get half decent at the 19" Trials and then the 24" size. I have read that some people got the hang of it on their 19" and 20"ers, and then they had a very hard time going to the 24" inch size. I see some posts where some folks had 22" units custom made to help them get used to the gap.

The plan was to after getting somewhat capable on the 24" then look into buying another at the 26, 27.5 or 29 size. After getting comfortable with that, then think about going for a 36" behemoth if I felt so inspired.

Most of what I have read indicates that 19/20" size is usually the best size to learn on. A minority seemed to disagree but thought that a 24" was the best sized learner. I have also read that those best at technical mountain riding are usually choose 24".

At the moment I don't care about speed, am more concerned with getting the skill. It's still faster than walking.

If I were to buy a 27.5" with a brake, it would more than likely be the KH going by all the feedback and comments and what I know so far.

I should ask Kris Holm if the 24" will be available with the upgraded unholy tubeless rim in the near future.
__________________
Unicycling is a Rite of Passage.
Up Rite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2017-11-02, 05:44 PM   #35
Up Rite
Unicyclist in training.
 
Up Rite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Wet Coast of the Great White North
Posts: 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric aus Chemnitz View Post

If you take and outboard disc, your Wheel will still be symmetrical and the only unsymmetrical part is a tab on the frame and 6 little knobs with threaded hole in your right crank, when you remove the brake system. And if not: every (E-V-E-R-Y-!) bicycle rear wheel is not symmetrical! Nothing wrong with this. Why shall a rim brake be more simple? Brake performance and rubbing with rim brakes is affected by wheel truing, wheel flax, frame flex, mud on the rim, ... Setting up a rim brake is not easier than to set up a disc brake. both are hydraulic brakes, nearly no maintenance, only changing pads. Couldn't be any easier, hum? And for the pic: You can also destroy pedals, cranks, rims, tires, spokes, tubes, frames, seatposts and seat when you crash hard. So I'd suggest: remove all those parts and go for a walk, if you want it really simple.
I was looking for a way to upgrade my walks and hikes into something more interesting. A unicycle wheel takes more stress than a bicycle wheel, and I think an "average cyclist" does not need all the gears, suspension, and gizmos that new bicycles come with. Some of it might be useful, but it is mostly unnecessary stuff that makes them far more expensive and complex. Those doodads primarily benefit bike manufacturers, shops, and thieves.
__________________
Unicycling is a Rite of Passage.
Up Rite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2017-11-02, 07:54 PM   #36
song
Unicyclist
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: New York City
Posts: 864
Quote:
Originally Posted by Up Rite View Post
I have read that some people got the hang of it on their 19" and 20"ers, and then they had a very hard time going to the 24" inch size. I see some posts where some folks had 22" units custom made to help them get used to the gap.
A 22" wheel?? That's crazy! Once you get your basic skills on a 20 (say, freemounting, idling, hopping, maybe riding backwards), you can ride any normal adult-sized wheel. Freemounting a larger wheel for the first few times can be tricky, but not enough to stop you from riding it, and sitting so high up can be a little scary at first, but if your skills are solid, you will adapt, probably within minutes. If you learn to properly ride your old KH20, your next uni can be a 29 if you want (mine was), or even a 36, or anything in between. Some of your skills may need to be re-learned on the larger wheel, others will transfer almost immediately, but just riding forward should not be any problem at all.
song is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2017-11-02, 08:27 PM   #37
finnspin
one wheeled cycling
 
finnspin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lüneburg,Germany
Posts: 463
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canoeheadted View Post
Less engineering and more riding.
^this.

I actually used to be super nerdy about unicycle parts, and theorize about what is best, what crank length would be ideal because I found 140mm too long and 125mm too short, but now I just ride.

Don't overthink. Get a mid tier uni, see what you like, and upgrade the parts you don't like later. If your goal is cross country riding, get yourself a 29", and if it takes a while to make the switch, so be it, but a 24" is really not much faster than a 20". Cross bridges once you get to them, the ones you are seeing might not even exist.

The struggles people have are blown out of proportion on this forum, I mean, who is going to start a new thread, the guy having an issue and looking for help, or the guy who just transfered from a 20" to a 29" without issues? The difficulties people have are overrepresented.
__________________
I do: Trials, Flat, Street, Downhill. Sometimes Freestyle.
finnspin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2017-11-02, 08:38 PM   #38
Up Rite
Unicyclist in training.
 
Up Rite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Wet Coast of the Great White North
Posts: 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by song View Post
A 22" wheel?? That's crazy! Once you get your basic skills on a 20 (say, freemounting, idling, hopping, maybe riding backwards), you can ride any normal adult-sized wheel. Freemounting a larger wheel for the first few times can be tricky, but not enough to stop you from riding it, and sitting so high up can be a little scary at first, but if your skills are solid, you will adapt, probably within minutes. If you learn to properly ride your old KH20, your next uni can be a 29 if you want (mine was), or even a 36, or anything in between. Some of your skills may need to be re-learned on the larger wheel, others will transfer almost immediately, but just riding forward should not be any problem at all.

http://www.unicyclist.com/forums/showthread.php?t=15954

http://www.unicyclist.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=120236

A big deal has been made in the cycling world about 27.5 wheels, hyped as an advantage over 26. Then next size up is 29, 32. On the smaller wheels, 16, 18, 19, and 20. These are all pretty close in size, and important to have with a larger 4" gap in the middle.

Why?
__________________
Unicycling is a Rite of Passage.
Up Rite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2017-11-02, 08:55 PM   #39
lightbulbjim
Unicyclist
 
lightbulbjim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: NSW, Australia
Age: 32
Posts: 344
Quote:
Originally Posted by Up Rite View Post
Why?
So that bike companies can sell more bikes

27.5/650B is not a new standard at all, it's just been "rediscovered" recently by bike companies as a good sales gimmick.
__________________
Unicycling is the fountain of youth.
lightbulbjim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2017-11-03, 12:09 AM   #40
Pinoclean
Unicyclist
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Up Rite View Post
http://www.unicyclist.com/forums/showthread.php?t=15954

http://www.unicyclist.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=120236

A big deal has been made in the cycling world about 27.5 wheels, hyped as an advantage over 26. Then next size up is 29, 32. On the smaller wheels, 16, 18, 19, and 20. These are all pretty close in size, and important to have with a larger 4" gap in the middle.

Why?
Finnspin is correct. If you learn on a 20" and get reasonably good you can go straight up to anything.

I learnt and could ride a trials and 20". 4 months after learning I did my first muni on a borrowed 24 and it was fine. The next time I went I bought a 26" and rode that.

The biggest thing to get used to is that the 26 is further off the ground and therefore feels a little bit more scary (if you are the type who worries about injury) but there is no need to ride a 24 at all. No one really rides a 24 for muni now even if "technical".

22's are really annoying to build and expensive due to hardly any parts, there is no reason to ever need to go from a 20 -> 22 -> 24 ->26. The 22" barely even feels different from the 20. It will just waste your money. Only build a 22" if you want a middle performance for a type of riding that it may actually suit.

I built one for hockey and Jack Sebben rides one for street/flat.

I built it as it was a middle ground between 20's-24's in terms of speed:agility trade-off, Jack built it because it rolls easier than a 19 trials for landing down stairsets but the wheel doesnt have as much inertia negatively affecting his spins.

In terms of muni its not going to be useful.


Last edited by Pinoclean; 2017-11-03 at 12:10 AM.
Pinoclean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2017-11-03, 01:42 AM   #41
Up Rite
Unicyclist in training.
 
Up Rite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Wet Coast of the Great White North
Posts: 160
My original plan was to learn on a 19/20", then get a serious 24" and limit myself to that size just in case something larger was too much of a handfull. Then after a year on that, get something bigger, likely a 27.5". I was planning on buying a new unicycle once every year, going up in size until I have the 36". I do plan on making the purchase of a new unicycle something I do every year, depending on how things go.


In that thread that one fellow was having a difficult time with the transition from 20 to 24. I do not expect to have this problem.

I have no plans to ever acquire a 22". I will probably skip the 26" size as well as they are being phased out due to deliberately planned obsolescence so companies can sell more hardware and force upgrades. (I expect there to be future hyped up BS return to 26" or some other new size in the quest for more money.)
__________________
Unicycling is a Rite of Passage.
Up Rite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2017-11-03, 02:44 AM   #42
lightbulbjim
Unicyclist
 
lightbulbjim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: NSW, Australia
Age: 32
Posts: 344
Quote:
Originally Posted by Up Rite View Post
My original plan was to learn on a 19/20", then get a serious 24" and limit myself to that size just in case something larger was too much of a handfull. Then after a year on that, get something bigger, likely a 27.5". I was planning on buying a new unicycle once every year, going up in size until I have the 36". I do plan on making the purchase of a new unicycle something I do every year, depending on how things go.


In that thread that one fellow was having a difficult time with the transition from 20 to 24. I do not expect to have this problem.

I have no plans to ever acquire a 22". I will probably skip the 26" size as well as they are being phased out due to deliberately planned obsolescence so companies can sell more hardware and force upgrades. (I expect there to be future hyped up BS return to 26" or some other new size in the quest for more money.)
I think you're overthinking things. If somebody asked me for advice, this is what I'd tell them:

1. Buy a cheap 20" or 24" for your first wheel. Use it for your initial learning.

2. Once you can ride the length of a block and freemount, work out what sort of riding you want to do, obtain an appropriate unicycle, and start using it. Any further skills you'll pick up along the way.

My point is, the point of owning a unicycle is to ride it. So just pick something suitable for the discipline you're interested in and go for it. I really don't think you need to worry about progressing through wheel sizes or anything like that.

Your second uni might be a trials wheel. Or a muni. Or a 36er. Or a giraffe. Don't agonise over the perfect machine, just pick something you like and ride it . You won't really know what you do and don't like until you have a fair few miles under your belt anyway.
__________________
Unicycling is the fountain of youth.
lightbulbjim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2017-11-03, 04:37 AM   #43
Pinoclean
Unicyclist
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightbulbjim View Post
I think you're overthinking things. If somebody asked me for advice, this is what I'd tell them:

1. Buy a cheap 20" or 24" for your first wheel. Use it for your initial learning.

2. Once you can ride the length of a block and freemount, work out what sort of riding you want to do, obtain an appropriate unicycle, and start using it. Any further skills you'll pick up along the way.

My point is, the point of owning a unicycle is to ride it. So just pick something suitable for the discipline you're interested in and go for it. I really don't think you need to worry about progressing through wheel sizes or anything like that.

Your second uni might be a trials wheel. Or a muni. Or a 36er. Or a giraffe. Don't agonise over the perfect machine, just pick something you like and ride it . You won't really know what you do and don't like until you have a fair few miles under your belt anyway.
I agree, you are overthinking things. Learn to ride, after you feel comfortable buy the wheel size best for what you want. More downhill muni? probably a 27.5, More cross country non technical muni a 29. More road riding? a 36.

You dont need to progress one size a year. If you waited an entire year after using a 26 to ride a 29 you would go to ride the 29 and think "I am an idiot this is barely different to my 26.. I could have done this 11 months ago"
Pinoclean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2017-11-03, 06:32 AM   #44
Up Rite
Unicyclist in training.
 
Up Rite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Wet Coast of the Great White North
Posts: 160
You guys seem to have missed a few of my posts.

I started off with an old trials Uni. Selected that because they were supposed to be very strong etc. I used to to be into heavy weightlifting and weighed way over 300 lb when I started.

I completely flattened the tire at its maximum psi and it was unuseable. So I overinflated the tires and it blew off the rim. No high psi tire was available for the 19" rim, so I ended up finding a 20" wheel set and put in a bmx tire that I could inflate to 100 psi. Then I could start practicing and my bodyweight went down.

I still cannot use a skinny low psi tire on a unicycle. I have dropped enough weight that a Trials 19" unicycle is now rideable. Several unicycles later, I have a used KH trials uni, which is immensely better than all the pre isis ones I had.

I also have a steel framed 24" that I had to replace the 1.75 x 24 65psi with a 2.10 x 24 110 psi tire or I could not ride it. Also upgraded the seat. I am concerned with breaking this one as it is older with cotterless cranks and the guy at the bike shop said that the rim was cheap and weak compared to current off road rims, and the whole wheel was probably not as durable as current parts. It feels vastly inferior to the KH trials when I ride it.

I have to go with a beefy uni with a big fat tire until I lose more weight, which will come as I progress with practice.

One of the reasons I was planning to buy one more uni every year is I expect there to be wear and tear on them as they age, and that newer better parts will be available in the future. Eventually I expect to have one Trials uni plus a at least a couple of other sizes in the stable. Good to have a back ups in case one breaks or gets stolen. Small wheeled Unis are supposed to be stronger than large wheels, after a couple of years of unicycling I expect to be much leaner and lighter, which will be easier on a 36", and I suspect it will be easier to mount with a lighter body.

By then, I should have enough experience, endurance, and knowledge so I am more likely to be able to do something epic like riding across the country or Europe on a touring uni or go ride down a mountain like a maniac.
__________________
Unicycling is a Rite of Passage.
Up Rite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2017-11-03, 12:49 PM   #45
rogeratunicycledotcom
Mostly OKish Unicyclist
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Stockon, UK
Posts: 1,626
Quote:
Originally Posted by Up Rite View Post
... I completely flattened the tire at its maximum psi and it was unuseable. So I overinflated the tires and it blew off the rim. No high psi tire was available for the 19" rim, so I ended up finding a 20" wheel set and put in a bmx tire that I could inflate to 100 psi. Then I could start practicing and my bodyweight went down.
This is exactly why we direct the heavier riders to bigger tyres. It is not unusual for us to suggest that the Club trials or Club Muni for learning on. We do point out that this is NOT for jumping (but what learner unicycle is!) and that it is just for learning to ride on. It works great.

Roger
__________________
++++++++++++++++++
Roger Davies
Unicycle.com in the UK
The UK's Unicycle Source
www.unicycle.uk.com
+++++++++++++++++++
rogeratunicycledotcom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
drilled, questions, rims


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
drilled or undrilled rims unicyclingizlife89 General Unicycling Discussions 4 2009-05-06 06:07 AM
Drilled Rims suck?! vanpaun General Unicycling Discussions 83 2008-07-12 10:16 AM
Drilled rims and eyeletting sp4rky-m4rky General Unicycling Discussions 10 2008-06-05 04:08 AM
Drilled airfoil rims mscalisi General Unicycling Discussions 9 2007-11-11 02:00 AM
Drilled rims? dunawan Just Conversation & Introduce Yourself 6 2007-02-19 10:25 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 09:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2001-2016 Gilby
Page generated in 0.11174 seconds with 11 queries