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Old 2009-01-26, 12:02 AM   #16
psbagumba
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My Coker arrived just 4 days ago and I think I'm getting the hang of it.
One thing that has helped me is the pins in the pedals. Normally I don't use pinned pedals on my 26 or my 20 - I feel like the risks are bigger than the benefit. But on a 36, it seems like the pedals never get close to your shins so I feel OK about using them. After I put them in my success rate at mounting has gone up.
My preferred method on my 26, and now on my 36, is the static mount. On the 36 I have to have a good amount of momentum with my body so I can get all the way up. So I get my pedals situated the way I want, then walk the wheel and when the right pedal is at 7 o'clock I place my foot and give a good tug on the seat handle while I jump using my left foot. That tug was something I figured out today and it seems to make all the difference in the world. It forces the wheel to stop (making it a static mount I guess) and it immediately puts my full weight on the frame so it doesn't flop over on its side.
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Old 2009-01-26, 01:53 AM   #17
johnfoss
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Quote:
Originally Posted by minkuni View Post
What I think John Foss meant was that you should start further back from the unicycle so that you have to take an extra step BEFORE you put a foot on the rear pedal.
That is correct. I should have done a better re-read of that post...

I have to do something similar when trying to mount my 9' giraffe. It has an articulated step on the back. So the sequence is to step on tire, step, down pedal, seat, then other pedal. But with the addition of the step, I have to start the process with my opposite foot...
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Old 2009-01-26, 04:05 AM   #18
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I would second john's comment of starting with a bit of momentum. The coker's so big and heavy that until you're used to its weight and getting it started, starting from a dead standstill is hard.

When I was learning I found that about a half revolution of walking beforehand was perfect for helping me get started. So if I were you, I'd start the uni with the cranks backward of how you'd normally get on, walk it a half revolution, then step on the back pedal when it gets about horizontal and let the momentum help carry you up and forward. Once you've got that down, then I'd try walking less and less till you can just hop on and ride. (since I'm short, I use a little jump mount to get on from standstill. I think it works pretty well lol)

Good luck with it!
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Old 2009-01-26, 06:17 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maestro8 View Post
Just curious, Jeremy, how long have you been riding 36ers? I don't know any people who hop / jump when they mount... sounds kinda sketch.
catinabag1 hops on his coker when he mounts. If I don't have enough momentum I hope on my 36'er when I mount... It's really sketch. I might make a video of me mounting my 36'er tomorrow, on my way to/from school.

As far as missing freemounts everyone misses them every once in a while.
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Old 2009-01-26, 09:32 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psbagumba View Post
My Coker arrived just 4 days ago and I think I'm getting the hang of it.
One thing that has helped me is the pins in the pedals. Normally I don't use pinned pedals on my 26 or my 20 - I feel like the risks are bigger than the benefit. But on a 36, it seems like the pedals never get close to your shins so I feel OK about using them. After I put them in my success rate at mounting has gone up.
My preferred method on my 26, and now on my 36, is the static mount. On the 36 I have to have a good amount of momentum with my body so I can get all the way up. So I get my pedals situated the way I want, then walk the wheel and when the right pedal is at 7 o'clock I place my foot and give a good tug on the seat handle while I jump using my left foot. That tug was something I figured out today and it seems to make all the difference in the world. It forces the wheel to stop (making it a static mount I guess) and it immediately puts my full weight on the frame so it doesn't flop over on its side.
Hmmm...interesting point about pinned pedals. I got a pair with the machine but put plastic standard ones on so as not to damage the magnesium pinned ones. However, I had come to the conclusion that I needed to get the good pedals on - so for my initial learning period I am going to get some pedal protectors from UDC. Will try the TT (tug-technique) today thanks for that
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Old 2009-01-27, 02:43 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ducttape View Post
As far as missing freemounts everyone misses them every once in a while.
...especially if they don't even have a 36er to mount. *Looks at Jeremy*

Seriously, though, despite the hundreds of miles that I've put on my 36er, I still flub mounts on a regular basis. Especially at stop lights and street corners, where more people are watching. It never seems to get any easier.

As much as pinned pedals help, they can also be a detriment, when your foot hits the pedal in the wrong place (say, at the heel). It's hard to correct a bad foot placement when you've got really grippy pedals.

You shouldn't be relying on the pins to get you going, however. After a good mount, you've got the majority of your weight in the saddle and not on the pedals, so your feet shouldn't be slipping off. I like to think of the mount as a hop into the saddle.

Good luck!
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Old 2009-01-27, 02:45 AM   #22
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Ok, I don't have a coker (yet.). Big deal. When My pants are uncomfortable on my muni, I stop, hop, and fix. If his pants are getting stuck, thats how he should fix them.
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Old 2009-01-27, 03:40 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maestro8 View Post
...especially if they don't even have a 36er to mount. *Looks at Jeremy*

Seriously, though, despite the hundreds of miles that I've put on my 36er, I still flub mounts on a regular basis. Especially at stop lights and street corners, where more people are watching. It never seems to get any easier.

As much as pinned pedals help, they can also be a detriment, when your foot hits the pedal in the wrong place (say, at the heel). It's hard to correct a bad foot placement when you've got really grippy pedals.

You shouldn't be relying on the pins to get you going, however. After a good mount, you've got the majority of your weight in the saddle and not on the pedals, so your feet shouldn't be slipping off. I like to think of the mount as a hop into the saddle.

Good luck!
I flub mounts daily... I flubbed about 3 today while filming(although these were due to my camera being in my way when mounting but still) I filmed a little bit today and put together a short video, I tried to put audio commentary to it but my mic wasn't working so I put in readable commentary I'll link to it when it's done exporting/uploading, I like to think of mounting my 36'er like leaping over the top of it.
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Old 2009-01-27, 03:41 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremy R View Post
Ok, I don't have a coker (yet.). Big deal. When My pants are uncomfortable on my muni, I stop, hop, and fix. If his pants are getting stuck, thats how he should fix them.
Except that it's a lot harder to hop SIF or keep control of a hop on a 36'er ESPECIALLY for a new rider lol
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Old 2009-01-27, 06:48 AM   #25
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Old 2009-01-27, 07:09 AM   #26
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Hi Monocyclism, many posts from the experts here have recommended a rolling start. I am new to the Coker and unicycling but here is a video of me doing a rolling mount that might help. I'm sure it is not very technically correct but it's working for me right now. And BTW, anyone notice this guy's age? You rock man! I'm sure you'll be at it into your nineties. Hoping the same myself. Cheers.
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Old 2009-01-27, 11:28 AM   #27
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I learnt to 36 freemount static by pulling up on the wheel (spokes when muddy) and was amazed when I got it first time
It's also what I use when I'm tired or out of practise as I'm less likely to flub.
(Jason, how can you use use the word flub to put a serious point across? that's risible!)
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Old 2009-01-27, 02:33 PM   #28
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I find the easiest way to mount my 36er is a normal static mount, the same as I use for other wheels. It just takes a bit more spring off the back foot. The only time this doesn't work is if I have to mount on a significant climb. If I fall off on a climb I'll either run to the top or mount sideways across the road and turn upwards. A rolling mount would be better in that situation, but I find them really hard.

It probably helps that I'm quite tall and favour longish (145mm) cranks. With shorter cranks it's much harder to get away from a standing start.

I think a rolling mount looks really cool, and I keep meaning to get better at it just for that reason (and it apparently uses less energy than a static mount when you're proficient at it), but I find a static mount so easy that I haven't had much incentive to practise alternatives

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Old 2009-01-27, 03:13 PM   #29
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As I do mainly off-road riding on my 36er I forced myself to get the static mounts down as that is often the only practical way to mount out on the trails. I really just treat mounting the 36er just like any other static mount on a smaller unicycle. The only modification I make is that I typically have the crank/pedal closest to me a bit lower than it would say for my 24" muni. By that for mounting my 24" my cranks are usually at say 10 o'clock and 4 o'clock, for the 36er I seem to be most successful with the cranks more like 11 o'clock and 5 o'clock (maybe not quite that much but close). I'm not tall so I think this "static" mount I do does have a slight roll since when I do this and am on top the cranks are level and some times I'll do a slight correction hop to get squared up and then ride off. All this is with 150mm cranks... For road riding, when I've got 115mm or 125mm cranks on there I've been more successful with more of a rolling mount to help get that forward momentum going.
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Old 2009-01-27, 06:19 PM   #30
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I started with a rolling mount, something like shown in Ducttape's video. Now, after a bit over a year of riding I take one step and then go up.

There's video of me about half way through my first 100 mile ride where I didn't want to put any mental energy into it at all and basically just ran with it until the pedels were in the right place and I was ready to go. About 1:30 in the following video:


You can just see my riding partner using the curb to assist in a static mount there too.

Ducttape, that video cracked me up. You missed the taint-angle perspective. And that guy at the end, nobody but 10 year olds seriously ask me if they can ride my 36r! Hilarious!

Last edited by boisei; 2009-01-27 at 06:21 PM.
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