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Old 2017-05-19, 02:33 PM   #1
bristlecone
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uni everesting?

Has anyone ever everested (or attempted to everest) on a uni?

I don't mean riding near the actual Mount Everest, which would be far more interesting and enjoyable. I mean ascending a total of 8848 vertical metres on a unicycle on a single ride without sleep.
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Old 2017-05-19, 02:54 PM   #2
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I'll have a look at where I can possibly do that. Not much hills in my area, I might have to climb the same 88 times.
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Old 2017-05-19, 03:46 PM   #3
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A lot of the listed rides, especially the ones with short overall distance, have hundreds of laps listed to make up the total climb.

All but one of those climbs will have a descent - find a brake that won't overheat? Interesting question if learning to freewheel or spinning at near neutral power would be lower stress.

The math is brutal though - a near-minimum (for a bike) 88 km ride would need to have an average grade around 20%, since the descending half of the distance doesn't count.

Or a mile century of laps on a 10% grade.

Or one could try to do something steep - Fargo 188 times?

There are of course no viable non-lap courses on Earth. The Everest comparison is also a bit stretched since the starting point for climbing the mountain is not sea level, but the part that is climbed has much less available oxygen than the routes most of these cycling attempts are going to be made on.

Still, count me out.
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Old 2017-05-19, 09:34 PM   #4
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Interesting... The list includes a few 8x Alpe d'Huez's which came to mind for me pretty quickly; also a couple of 4x Col du Galibier's and a 5x Mont Ventoux, Stelvio, Mortirolo, etc. If I were to travel that far to do any of those legendary climbs, and if I had the legs for it, more than one rep might almost be sensible.
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Old 2017-05-20, 02:58 PM   #5
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A more realistic approach might be to imitate the days needed for climbing everest. They don't climb all those meters in one day after all, they make camps along the way.
Imitating that you could do a tour in the Andes/alps/pyrenees/local hilly area and plan the route to match the vertical meters of everest
To enhance the experience you could throw on a backpack, put in a light mountaineering tent and other mtn climber equipment
Also end the tour on highest peak there is.
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Old 2017-05-20, 05:10 PM   #6
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They make several acclimatization climbs which takes weeks of preparation, however, when it's time to summit most will do so in a span of 2 or 3 days from base camp depending on weather.
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Old 2017-05-21, 06:36 AM   #7
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I think Aspen Mike has done that much climbing in a morning - but, to be fair, he did have to delay his lunch.
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Old 2017-05-22, 02:57 AM   #8
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If you're doing it with multiple climbs, why do you have to ride down? Since we're not counting the down, and it's only a reset so you can continue going up, why not take a shuttle vehicle? Everest climbers also rest on the way up.

I know Aspenmike has ridden up Mauna Loa in Hawaii (~14,000') in a day, but it was a very long ride distance-wise, so not necessarily possible to repeat without sleep. For him it would probably be more of a case of going up one of his favorite local climbs (or a series of close together ones) closer to Aspen.
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Old 2017-05-23, 02:39 AM   #9
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Or you could just run up the damned thing:
Quote:
Forgoing oxygen aid and fixed ropes, Spanish ultramarathoner Kilian Jornet summited Mount Everest early Monday, around midnight. His roughly 12,400-foot ascent from Everest Base Camp (elevation 17,600 feet) took just 26 hours. Most hikers—supported with additional oxygen and ropes—take up to four days to cover the same distance.
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Old 2017-05-23, 03:41 AM   #10
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More impressive (to me) is the fact he didn't use fixed ropes.
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Old 2017-05-24, 12:18 AM   #11
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Surely everesting a unicycle would be not much harder than everesting a bike. In terms of speed most climbers would be going in low gear on a bike also. I think a shuttle on the way down would help out also, or you need to be able to use your brakes well.

The other thing that may useful to consider is whether or not you do a short steep accent or a long gradual one. A long gradual one would be easier to ride up but without a shuttle would take a lot of time do descent. A steep one should be a much shorter decent time (as long as you had a brake).
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Old 2017-05-24, 01:18 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinoclean View Post
I think a shuttle on the way down would help out also
The Cog Railroad on Mt. Washington in New Hampshire climbs about 1100 meters; it has been descended on a rail sled in an alleged 2 minutes and 45 seconds.

Alas the road with the annual bike race in which unicycles have participated is on the opposite side.

Also the rail sliders are long banned.

But find a hill with an alpine slide installation?
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Old 2017-05-24, 01:19 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinoclean View Post
Surely everesting a unicycle would be not much harder than everesting a bike. In terms of speed most climbers would be going in low gear on a bike also. I think a shuttle on the way down would help out also, or you need to be able to use your brakes well.
If you're not shuttling (which you wouldn't do on a bike, because there's no need) you'll be spending a lot longer on the descent than somebody on a bike - and unlike the person on the bike you'll be putting energy into balancing. Personally I also climb a lot faster on a bike - I appreciate there are some here who can climb a lot faster than I can on a unicycle, but they would probably also climb faster on a bike.
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Old 2017-05-24, 01:35 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by aracer View Post
Personally I also climb a lot faster on a bike - I appreciate there are some here who can climb a lot faster than I can on a unicycle, but they would probably also climb faster on a bike.
This presents an interesting theoretical question. Anecdotally, climbs are where a lot of moderately strong unicyclists finally get to show our capability compared to the most casual bicyclists who could on other terrain fly by with benefit of gears or freewheels.

But conceivably there's a hill grade where an optimally skilled unicyclist on an optimally chosen unicycle could have an efficiency gain over the same athlete hauling up a bike. Apparently there exists one were running on foot matches biking (at the point of climbing a ladder, this becomes obvious).

But while eliminating the second wheel, frame members, and transmission might not be the most effective 10 lbs of weight needing hauling up the hill to personally save, it is the most enticing.
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Old 2017-05-24, 04:05 AM   #15
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There is no hill grade at which a unicycle is more efficient than a bike. The unicycle efficiency deficit is greater or lesser at different grades, mostly depending on the effective gear ratio (which is selectable on a bike but not on a uni).

I wouldn't say Everesting on a unicycle is impossible. But it's probably harder than anything that's been done on a unicycle.

Mont Ventoux has been done four times, 6000m.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmRwtD20dFQ
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