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Old 2018-03-09, 07:44 AM   #16
Mikefule
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I use Shimano BMX shoes. Fat grippy soles which can cope with pinned pedals and which are thick enough to protect my foot from the pressure. They have a Velcro flap that covers the laces to stop them dangling and tangling.

I don't think the brand is as important as the comfort and secure grip.
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Old 2018-03-09, 09:01 AM   #17
pierrox
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piece Maker View Post
5.10's are all well and good but they are very overbuilt if you're not a muni rider! I'd prefer something slim and lightweight if possible.
True for the big ones like the Sam Hill model or its sisters.

Not true for some of their other ones, they have a "dirt" series which are more human looking. I have a pair of Spitfire and they look like skateboard shoes. They're pretty sturdy as I still have them. They grip marginally less than the bulky MTB ones.

They even do a casual series for the fashion conscious BMX riders.
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Old 2018-03-09, 10:12 AM   #18
Moslki
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Originally Posted by Canoeheadted View Post
I'm with Jim on this one. I like heels as a safety for muni.
I have monkey feet so Keens are my hikers of choice for riding.

My routine is to buy a quality pair of hiking boots and use them for a year or two for hiking then switch them to your riding boots and use them for two years of muni while your new hikers are broken in for riding.
That is what I have been doing until now. I was quite happy using walking boots (with ankle coverage) but lately I have been trying more daring tricks/riding with my Unis and because of the really wet weather (and probably my lack of skills) I missed the pedal quite a few times. I've got the standard Nimbus plastic pedals with metal pins on them, but even so when it gets wet (and muddy if doing Muni) the sole of my walking boots doesn't quite grip enough.

Anyway, after reading so many good things about the 5.10s, I bought my self I pair of Impact High for Christmas (I always wear 'high' boots with ankle coverage). They are so grippy is actually a bit scary (it takes you a few rides to get used to it!). I am happy to confirm what everybody says in the forum: they are chunky and robust, excellent at absorbing the shock of drops,rough terrain etc.. The sole of my feet don't feel achy after riding with them. They are really comfortable once you get used to the tight fit (which I think is normal in cycling shoes and actually I can see the point now that I am using them). They are expensive shoes so I hope they last long enough.

I am quickly getting really used to them and now I find the walking shoes not as good for riding as I used to think they were.
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Old 2018-03-09, 10:27 AM   #19
kunstrasen
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As already mentioned before there is a difference between Muni and trick related needs. For tricks too much grip is not wanted.

Beside this the shoe is just one part of the story. The other part of the grip is coming from the pedal. Here you will also find a big difference in grip. In other words: You won´t be happy with a 5´10 shoe in Muni if you ride a freestyle pedal.

Just random examples of 2 different worlds:
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Old 2018-03-09, 01:38 PM   #20
Piece Maker
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Originally Posted by JimT View Post
My thinking right now it to find some shoes with heels and/or add a heel or heel extension to provide a near clipless pedal security. This could eliminate the need for wicked spiked pedals and shin-guards.

Jim
I had this problem a lot (sliding off forwards) when I switched to flat shoes. Like you I used to ride in boots that have a bit of a heel, but it does plant your foot a bit too far forward on the pedal. I would generally ride more towards my toes but then let the heel 'lock on' if I felt myself sliding forward.

As an alternative, give half toe clips a try. I ran them on my 36er for ages and really got along with them! Mounting with them is a bit tricky, but if you do a fairly forceful rollback the pedal will flip round as your second feet joins it. Otherwise it's easy enough to learn to flip them round while in motion. The only tricky part was learning to always dismount off the back, rather than the un-graceful off the front and grab saddle between your legs method

I know this forum is generally against any sort of foot retention, but half clips are easy to learn, at least easier than SPD's (for me at least) and allow you to shove your feet forward!
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Old 2018-03-09, 01:40 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrox View Post
True for the big ones like the Sam Hill model or its sisters.

Not true for some of their other ones, they have a "dirt" series which are more human looking. I have a pair of Spitfire and they look like skateboard shoes. They're pretty sturdy as I still have them. They grip marginally less than the bulky MTB ones.

They even do a casual series for the fashion conscious BMX riders.
Those Spitfires look alright! Are they still nice and stiff on the sole? The dirtbags aren't too bad either, I'd probably go for those over the Spitfires for the high top.
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Old 2018-03-09, 02:45 PM   #22
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As a beginner muni rider, I frequently kicked the ground hard with one of my feet during a dismount. I appreciated the stiff toe of the 5-10 shoes for that reason. My most recent pair of shoes are 5-10. They're called "Freerider", but they're a more flexible (older?) version. I can feel the pedals more with these shoes, which I like. However, on a few long muni rides, my feet got tired because of the flexibility of the shoes. I added extra insoles to the shoes, and that helped with the pain in my feet. I found a good compromise for a variety of riding.

I wear 5-10s with Nimbus pinned pedals for muni. The pins are not overly aggressive, making it easier to reposition my feet. One rider mentioned above that 5-10s would not be desirable with freestyle pedals. Maybe not for freestyle, maybe not for muni, but I think this combination might be all right for beginners. You won't slip off too easily, but you won't get caught on the pedals for too long, either.

And the comment about using Sambas for muni. I don't know any riders who do this. Maybe if a rider does a lot of freestyle, then they'll want to keep using the same shoes for muni.
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Old 2018-03-09, 03:07 PM   #23
finnspin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
And the comment about using Sambas for muni. I don't know any riders who do this. Maybe if a rider does a lot of freestyle, then they'll want to keep using the same shoes for muni.
I use them, since I don't see any reason at all to buy special shoes for different disciplines. In my experience, as long as it's a "sports" shoe with flat-ish soles, it doesn't matter at all what you are wearing. There are shoes that last longer than others (fivetens, and the mentioned Sambas), but when it comes to riding performance, I found 0 differences. Coming from a Flatland/Street/Freestyle perspective, what people want is mainly a shoe that lasts. Buying new shoes every few months gets expensive really fast.

The whole "grip" thing tends to be overrated in my eyes, since most times, when someone slips of the pedal, it's not the lack of grip that's an issue, it's a mistake in riding that causes it. I had an issue with my feet moving of the pedal on sidehops, and switched from plastic pedals to aluminum pedals with pins. The issue remained, the problem I was having was that I let my uni get too far away from me.

For beginners especially, I have taught hundreds of people how to unicycle, and as long as they were wearing shoes, I've never seen anyone have difficulties because of their shoes.
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Old 2018-03-09, 10:10 PM   #24
pierrox
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piece Maker View Post
Those Spitfires look alright! Are they still nice and stiff on the sole?
They're not as stiff as the MTB Fivetens, but they're stiffer than regular trainers. They're also comfy and you can spend the day walking around with them.


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as long as they were wearing shoes, I've never seen anyone have difficulties because of their shoes.
At the end of the day, that's what it boils down to!
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Old 2018-03-11, 10:43 AM   #25
mowcius
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I currently ride 5.10 Freerider elements (the mostly waterproof winter version of the Freerider).

In the summer I'll likely be riding Freerider Canvas or Spitfire.

Personally I like wide and flat skate/MTB shoes with nice flexible soles.

I've tried Airwalks (lasted about 2 months), DCs (lasted about 4 months) and now I'm on my second pair of 5.10s (the last pair lasted me about 10 months).

I always wear through the soles on my shoes before anything else but I do wear them almost all day every day.

Grip wise, the basic pinned plastic pedals have very little grip whatever shoes you ride with, but with what I ride - Nukeproof Electrons (or Electron Evo - not as recommended personally for build quality reasons), or Savage Components Slim Jims - I have no real issues with any shoes.
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Old 2018-03-11, 03:10 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrox View Post
They're not as stiff as the MTB Fivetens, but they're stiffer than regular trainers. They're also comfy and you can spend the day walking around with them.
I'd be more interested in a specific unicycle shoe, as if I'm walking around all day I tend to wear shoes made for that! I'd be well up for some sort of equivalent to a good, solid and lightweight road cycling shoe but with Stealth on the bottom. Hell I'd probably give up the clipless pedals on the road bike if that existed.
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Old 2018-03-11, 03:45 PM   #27
mowcius
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piece Maker View Post
I'd be more interested in a specific unicycle shoe, as if I'm walking around all day I tend to wear shoes made for that! I'd be well up for some sort of equivalent to a good, solid and lightweight road cycling shoe but with Stealth on the bottom. Hell I'd probably give up the clipless pedals on the road bike if that existed.
You might like the Freerider Pros then. They're more like a road cycling shoe than the standard Freeriders.

http://www.mbr.co.uk/reviews/shoes/f...-freerider-pro
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Old 2018-03-14, 12:00 AM   #28
Alice Arctan
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Has anyone tried the Pearl Izumi X-ALP Launch? It's a low-top MTB shoe in flat and SPD versions, the former with a dual compound sole (Vibram Megagrip on the pedals, harder stuff fore and aft for walking around on), claimed weight of 340g (I don't know what size), and price of $150. Reviews I've seen have been good.
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Old 2018-03-14, 04:50 AM   #29
elpuebloUNIdo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alice Arctan View Post
Has anyone tried the Pearl Izumi X-ALP Launch? It's a low-top MTB shoe in flat and SPD versions, the former with a dual compound sole (Vibram Megagrip on the pedals, harder stuff fore and aft for walking around on), claimed weight of 340g (I don't know what size), and price of $150. Reviews I've seen have been good.
The changing tread pattern is just too weird. A lot of my riding is done closer to the toe. The tread at the toe is not flat. The pedal pins could get lodged in the tread, and repositioning could be harder when riding close to the toe. What happens when some of the pedal is on the central part of the tread, and some of the pedal is on the toe or heel portion?
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Old 2018-03-14, 02:32 PM   #30
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