Unicyclist Community

Go Back   Unicyclist Community > Unicycling Discussion > General Unicycling Discussions

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 2016-03-12, 01:07 AM   #31
Canapin
Unicyclist
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 35
Thing is, I've first rode my 29" for about 2 years without any problem! Puzzling…

Your link is interesting, I'm going to read it… Tomorrow.

Last edited by Canapin; 2016-03-12 at 01:08 AM.
Canapin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2016-03-14, 01:12 PM   #32
skilewis74
Stupidity gets you 2 of these:
 
skilewis74's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Greenfield, MA
Age: 43
Posts: 4,418
Send a message via Yahoo to skilewis74
Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrox View Post
I read your story, and it's amazing what you do on a uni, congrats!
Thanks Getting acknowledged occasionally keeps me motivated when I get frustrated about even some of the basic things I still can't do, like freemounting w/o a tree/ boulder/ shoulder for help.
__________________
Ride everywhere and never just ride anywhere. If you can ride where you are going within a hour, do it, and if you can do a trick 50-75% of the time do it along the way.- Bob Burnquist

What's next?
Learn2Ride&doTricks
TrialsClasses&Building
skilewis74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2016-03-14, 09:41 PM   #33
NotSoYoungOne
One wheelin' the Wasatch Front
 
NotSoYoungOne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Utah
Age: 53
Posts: 346
Dominant leg

Thanks for your ideas UPD, I will try them out!

I think the main reason for my twist is that my dominant leg is just pushing harder which twists the uni under me - to the left in this case. Another post above, don't remember which one, mentioned relaxing more and keeping weight on the saddle not the legs. This works pretty well, but I still need to strengthen my weaker leg and focus on not letting the dominant leg rule the ride.
__________________
If you always do what you always did you'll always get what you always got.
NotSoYoungOne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2016-03-15, 06:55 AM   #34
UPD
fail better.
 
UPD's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Age: 43
Posts: 784
Haha!! Im flattered. You're not taking my kooky ideas seriously are you??? Arms behind back and leaning foward, that's masochistic and asking for a faceplant!

Just kidding. And seriously, it works really well for me! Anytime I go with something unfamiliar such as a bigger wheel or shorter cranks. I definitely do the arms behind back thing. Even for long rides I do it. When my back aches I do it. When I want to go faster or face blasting winds I do it.

You mention you have a dominant leg. My right is for sure dominant, forever dominant. I could hardly do any strong kicks with my left. I believe when you start riding more, building up muscles again and get comfortable again, try the arms in front close to the stomach and hips, shoulders square is also the key. Often times a twist comes from a arm and a shoulder lurching forward, not just a dominate leg. Arms behind back isolates that, pay attention on keeping shoulders square. Isolation is the key. With practice you should then be able to swerve with the very slightest hip, knee and ankle movements. So when you're used to isolation of your upper body, it learns to stays still, and thus you're able to track much straighter. Afterwhile, it really get rid of the flailing arm movements entirely. And when you're tracking straight, that means you have gotten rid of your twists and your pedal strokes uses just the right amount of pressure.
At least for me, it applies true

Btw, I just drilled and tapped for 88s on my 36er. I can't wait to hit the trails with them!! With my arms behind back of course
UPD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2016-03-28, 09:19 PM   #35
pierrox
Unicyclist
 
pierrox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Between Paris, Grenoble, NY and NC
Age: 46
Posts: 991
Quote:
Originally Posted by UPD View Post
You mention you have a dominant leg.
Have been working on that lately. I took the 29" out last week and realised that I had the left sit bone planted in the saddle, but not the right. After a few miles, with a lot of concentration, I could sit properly. When I tense up, I feel that I rise it again. Probably because of years of BMX and other 2 wh**l sports that require you to stand to dampen the terrain...

But I carry on and the good old saying is true: time in the saddle is the answer. As long as it's done with concentration and analyzing what's happening.

The other thing that helps me a lot is to vary the unis I'm using on a same day. I took the 36" after an hour of 29" and that thing was so easy. I could clearly feel my right leg doing the work, but the inertia of that big wheel gives so much time to correct a mistake that I was surprisingly more relaxed - camber is hardly a problem with the 36"!

Now I need to fix the tube... the Foss tube failed at the valve, that can't be fixed. Wondering if I should just put a 29" tube in there, the weight saving must be close, and the $ saving is quite high... Anyone put a lightweight latex 29" tube in a 36"? Or would it not cope with the stretch?

Today I rode the 24" off road, and it currently has the Zero saddle. I actually had a lot of fun and realised that I spin way faster with it. Clearly the smaller speed and the prospect of falling in mud is less scary that face planting on tarmac!

Can't wait for the next session now...
pierrox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2016-03-29, 11:05 PM   #36
Bradford
Corporate Escapee
 
Bradford's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: North Texas
Posts: 455
I have the same problem, and it came out of nowhere. I never twisted before. I noticed it after I bought a new unicycle, and I thought it had something to do with it. In order to go straight, I have to bring my right shoulder way back. I've now got another new unicycle, and I'm still twisting just as bad. If I sit perfectly upright and level and let the unicycle go where it wants, it will turn in a circle to the left. That's fine when the road is curving to the left, otherwise, it really sucks.

This happens on all three of my unis. It has nothing to do with tires, camber of the road/trail, or even how the seat is positioned to the right or left of center. It's really starting to effect my ride, and the more I notice it, the worse it seems to get.

I've tried all kinds of things, and I've noticed that it's actually a little difficult for me to ride in a circle to my right. I have to almost stop or slow down and swing the unicycle around. It's totally weird!

The best I can tell is that I'm leaning the unicycle slightly to the left. I'm wondering if maybe my back or tailbone is crooked now, possibly from an injury or some sort of weird habit I've picked up. Putting my knees out and/or changing the position of my feet seem to give some relief, but oddly, sitting crooked on the saddle seems to provide the best relief. You'd think if that were true, then it's an issue with the alignment of the saddle, but I've tried all kinds of different alignments (straight, to the right, to the left, etc), and it does nothing. If I really concentrate on leaning the unicycle to the right, it does seem to help a little, so I think I may be on to something there.

Whatever the case is, I think I've got a lot of work to do to retrain myself how to ride. That's gonna be tough after almost 30 years! Thanks for all the comments and advice!
Bradford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2016-03-30, 10:56 AM   #37
UniDreamerFR
Unicyclist
 
UniDreamerFR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: France, near Paris
Age: 43
Posts: 447
The issue could be related not to the saddle but to what's just on it, especially when you are a man, you know what I mean.
What about putting several cyclist shorts at once ? :


I do wear 2 shorts at once, one exactly like this one and another cheaper.
Barely have unexplained auto steer issues (when there is no real camber) since I use those.

my 2c
__________________
- Geared kh36 + King George + Kh Tbar + HS33
- Qu-ax 36" + nightrider +Q-handle+ cable rim brake
- kh 29" + knard 29x3+ kh Tbar + HS33
- Qu-ax trial 19"
-24"&26" wheels and forks and spare stuffs.
UniDreamerFR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2016-03-30, 03:31 PM   #38
Bradford
Corporate Escapee
 
Bradford's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: North Texas
Posts: 455
Quote:
Originally Posted by UniDreamerFR View Post
The issue could be related not to the saddle but to what's just on it, especially when you are a man, you know what I mean.
What about putting several cyclist shorts at once ? :


I do wear 2 shorts at once, one exactly like this one and another cheaper.
Barely have unexplained auto steer issues (when there is no real camber) since I use those.

my 2c
That sounds very plausible. I was riding with two pairs of shorts, but one of them wasn't cycling shorts. After I got my new 24" muni yesterday (woohoo!) I was working on this, and I do seem to be leaning the unicycle to the left. This unicycle is taller than my old unis, and I have more to work with, if that makes any sense. When I try to lean the unicycle to the right, that seems to help. Of course, it could also be that I'm not really resolving the source of the problem but merely compensating for it. I did notice, however, that when I was riding off road, the issue became invisible. I was concentrating so hard on not falling that I didn't really care what it took to stay upright, heh, heh!
Bradford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2016-03-30, 04:27 PM   #39
UPD
fail better.
 
UPD's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Age: 43
Posts: 784
I think its a beginner's delema thats all!

Ultimately it's just more time on the saddle that will correct this twisted riding problem. This is what helps me, not too high on the psi, lowered saddle height with a good bend to the knees so when falling you wont reach out to the ground and hyper exend your legs, especially when freshly going to bigger wheel. Practice with plenty of deliberate falls. Practice slaloms and circles. Practice to make sharper turns. Try rougher terrain and hills. Keep shoulders square, arms close together and practice to rely on your hips for turning.
Try steering similar to remembering how when you first rode a bike without the use of the handlebars, using your hips, a slight shift of the weight, instead of the shoulders and arms. Then when you get better , then you can add arms and shoulders to really throw into it. But at first, you can flail all you want with arms and shoulders , but if your hips, knees and ankles wont respond well, you wont make effective turns. Very similar to turning in skiing or snowboarding, if you ever tried.

When your're comfortable and less concentrated on keeping upright your twisting will eventually go away. Simple as that
UPD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2016-03-30, 07:16 PM   #40
Bradford
Corporate Escapee
 
Bradford's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: North Texas
Posts: 455
Quote:
Originally Posted by UPD View Post
I think its a beginner's delema thats all!
That's probably true for most, but certainly not for me. After almost 30 years of riding, it just came out of the blue, around the same time I started getting more active again in all kinds of activities where I fall on concrete and other surfaces occasionally. That leads me to be more suspicious of injury, spinal, hip, etc. misalignment or something like that. Regardless of how much I ride, it stays the same.

Oddly enough, going off road (something new for me) makes me much LESS aware of the issue as I focus on trying to stay upright and while my legs are turning to jelly. :-) (I think the answer for me may be just to stay off level surfaces, heh, heh.)

I've noticed that when there's a significant amount of camber sloping to the left, the problem gets better, and I've just about made up my mind that my issues are caused from the unicycle leaning to the left. I just have to figure out how to compensate for that, but intentionally leaning the unicycle to the right has proven a bit difficult so far, but I'll keep at it. I'm sure I'll get there eventually. I know a few exercise that help with getting your spine and other stuff in line, and I may give those a shot too.
Bradford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2016-03-30, 09:00 PM   #41
UPD
fail better.
 
UPD's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Age: 43
Posts: 784
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradford View Post
That's probably true for most, but certainly not for me. After almost 30 years of riding, it just came out of the blue, around the same time I started getting more active again in all kinds of activities where I fall on concrete and other surfaces occasionally. That leads me to be more suspicious of injury, spinal, hip, etc. misalignment or something like that. Regardless of how much I ride, it stays the same.

Oddly enough, going off road (something new for me) makes me much LESS aware of the issue as I focus on trying to stay upright and while my legs are turning to jelly. :-) (I think the answer for me may be just to stay off level surfaces, heh, heh.)

I've noticed that when there's a significant amount of camber sloping to the left, the problem gets better, and I've just about made up my mind that my issues are caused from the unicycle leaning to the left. I just have to figure out how to compensate for that, but intentionally leaning the unicycle to the right has proven a bit difficult so far, but I'll keep at it. I'm sure I'll get there eventually. I know a few exercise that help with getting your spine and other stuff in line, and I may give those a shot too.

Wow, that's weird

I'd say just keep on riding the offroads for a few months since you're less conscientious of it, and get back to us... ( Im still willing to bet it'll self correct)
Ride on my friend, ride on!!
UPD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2016-03-31, 07:44 AM   #42
pierrox
Unicyclist
 
pierrox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Between Paris, Grenoble, NY and NC
Age: 46
Posts: 991
I think UPD is to right though. As the wheel size increases, it exacerbates the things we're not doing right. With all due respect, on a 20" you were probably going at a walking pace and had to be weary of all changes on the surface you were riding on. The 24 is taller, heavier, but also rolls over stuff better, so you end up going much faster than the increase in size would let you think.
All of UPD's recommendations are great. I'll also add the one he suggested ona previous page: once comfortable ride with your hands joined in front. Then with your hands in the back. That's great advice.
pierrox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2016-03-31, 08:12 AM   #43
UniDreamerFR
Unicyclist
 
UniDreamerFR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: France, near Paris
Age: 43
Posts: 447
Yeah UPD and Pierrox are right
I would add an exercice that greatly improved my ability to controle the unicycle without using my shoulders but instead my lower body: if you have a handlebar try to keep both hands on it as long as you can even in difficult situations.
You will be forced to use your crotch and legs to keep balance.
Your elbows will have to stay close to your body and from each other, not wide open.
Each time I feel that I am loosing my ability to handle real or imaginary cambers I return to this practice
I guess it also works with the seat handle if you have not handlebar.
__________________
- Geared kh36 + King George + Kh Tbar + HS33
- Qu-ax 36" + nightrider +Q-handle+ cable rim brake
- kh 29" + knard 29x3+ kh Tbar + HS33
- Qu-ax trial 19"
-24"&26" wheels and forks and spare stuffs.

Last edited by UniDreamerFR; 2016-03-31 at 08:14 AM.
UniDreamerFR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2016-03-31, 03:46 PM   #44
Bradford
Corporate Escapee
 
Bradford's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: North Texas
Posts: 455
Great suggestions. I'll give them a try and see what happens. I think one of the great things about riding a unicycle is that it's hard and challenging, and this is just one more challenge I'll feel good about overcoming!
Bradford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2016-11-21, 07:00 PM   #45
pierrox
Unicyclist
 
pierrox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Between Paris, Grenoble, NY and NC
Age: 46
Posts: 991
Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrox View Post
I think it boils down to a couple of factors:
- my pelvis is slightly twisted, my osteopath and physiotherapist often spend some time on that when I go see them.
I was looking for a place to ask for advice, instead of starting a new thread, and I came across something I had touched on earlier this year. It's linked for sure...

Been doing a lot of stretches to work on that, but there's still something I find myself doing when I get tired, or if it's not a great session, or I get into a stressful situation (traffic for instance): I don't sit even on the saddle. I can clearly feel that my right sitbone is fully seated, whereas my left one is not. It just doesn't feel fully in contact with the saddle. I'm trying to force it down, but it just doesn't want to. Any advice? Any exercices? On or off my uni?
pierrox is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bad, habit, riding, twisted


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Unlearning bad unicycling habit - help sweetalex52 General Unicycling Discussions 15 2014-05-06 12:54 AM
Weird habit developed - Riding 'sideways', twisted body Piece Maker General Unicycling Discussions 20 2013-08-18 03:09 PM
Bad riding day Mikefule General Unicycling Discussions 18 2012-12-07 03:56 PM
Do you ever feel bad when riding by physically handicapped people? Dane M General Unicycling Discussions 26 2011-02-07 08:12 AM
A bad habit? CircusPassion General Unicycling Discussions 3 2008-01-29 12:18 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 07:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2001-2016 Gilby
Page generated in 0.10286 seconds with 10 queries