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Old 2019-08-29, 05:56 AM   #31
johnfoss
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Originally Posted by Gockie View Post
Perhaps I'm a bit afraid. I'm a middle aged woman with a dodgy right knee who only started riding unicycles less than 2 years ago...
Fair enough. I do remember learning to do a rolling (or running) mount on a 6' Giraffe, but again this was at a much younger age. It's a much bigger step, requiring quite a bit more energy to launch you up there. It did take me a while to get confident with my commitment of that much force into a pedal.

So I broke it down into smaller components. For a 36", the obvious thing to start with is a smaller wheel, if you have one available. Even then, you can break it down a bit more. Just practice the step-on. Step on, but only with a bit of force, so you then step back off to the rear. You can build up the force as you go, always stopping before you reach "the top", and falling back.

After that, you can follow through, but not try to ride away. Step on, go up to top-dead-center and beyond, to step off the front. You don't even need to put your second foot on the pedal. This is not scary to do on a smaller wheel, especially if you've worked your way there in small increments.

Then repeat on the (or a) bigger wheel. Get comfortable with the dismounts to the rear, and then the front. Being used to making those dismounts will build confidence for the eventual ride-off. Dodgy knee? Try the other one. Clearly the foot that goes first is doing most of the work, so if you aren't too locked into that foot/leg, try the other one. Have I done this? Maybe, but it would have been a long time ago. I'm imagining doing it now, and it's a little intimidating. I might start on a smaller wheel myself!

The last scary part is when you start to focus on the ride-off. If you don't go, you will start to fall to the side. But that happens. Make sure to incorporate it into your practicing. Let the wheel go down, to each side, so you learn how to land that. Or, if you're comfortable with doing hops, try one or two before bailing. Many of my mounts on my 36", with heavy hub and long handlebar, include a little side hop just before I start to ride away. This cancels out a side lean, and gives you more time to ride off in your intended direction without course corrections or flailing.

So try it. Take it slow, concentrate on how to land. Soon it will be a lot less intimidating!
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Old 2019-08-29, 05:59 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by JimT View Post
I like your "Power Steering" idea. But unless you can switch hands, it's really only good for turning left. Like a race car.
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Old 2019-08-29, 05:59 AM   #33
Setonix
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Originally Posted by Gockie View Post
I think the benefit of the rolling mount is that it gives the person mounting momentum to get onto the unicycle. To statically get on (i.e. To mount without the momentum start) is a big ask, a huge step is required and it's not something many people can do with any ease.

Me... The only way I've found I can freemount a 36er is with a tire grab mount. But that's impossible to do with handlebars.

So I want to learn the rolling mount but I haven't been able to get it... Perhaps I'm a bit afraid. I'm a middle aged woman with a dodgy right knee who only started riding unicycles less than 2 years ago...
Doesn't middle-aged start at 50? I don't feel that old :P
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Old 2019-08-29, 06:07 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by johnfoss View Post
The last scary part is when you start to focus on the ride-off. If you don't go, you will start to fall to the side. But that happens. Make sure to incorporate it into your practicing. Let the wheel go down, to each side, so you learn how to land that. Or, if you're comfortable with doing hops, try one or two before bailing. Many of my mounts on my 36", with heavy hub and long handlebar, include a little side hop just before I start to ride away. This cancels out a side lean, and gives you more time to ride off in your intended direction without course corrections or flailing.
Yes the tumbling off side ways. I had that quite often with the 36 as I didn't jump up high enough. Last time I sat on the seat with both my feet dangling and slowly falling side-ways unable to get off. That wasn't pleasant as I hit the street. The most annoying thing with the 36 is that riding it feels so good. Many times I get frustrated with the mounting and just think about selling it, but when I'm actually on top and ride a few rounds, then it is very comfy.
Next time I will try to make a few hops, like Uni-geezer does with all his mounts.
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Old 2019-08-29, 08:18 AM   #35
Gockie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Setonix View Post
The most annoying thing with the 36 is that riding it feels so good. Many times I get frustrated with the mounting and just think about selling it, but when I'm actually on top and ride a few rounds, then it is very comfy.
Next time I will try to make a few hops, like Uni-geezer does with all his mounts.
Yep. Damn mounting! The 36er is so nice for distances. Just terrible for getting back on. I need a personal helper....
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Old 2019-08-29, 08:22 AM   #36
Gockie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnfoss View Post
Fair enough. I do remember learning to do a rolling (or running) mount on a 6' Giraffe, but again this was at a much younger age. It's a much bigger step, requiring quite a bit more energy to launch you up there. It did take me a while to get confident with my commitment of that much force into a pedal.

So I broke it down into smaller components. For a 36", the obvious thing to start with is a smaller wheel, if you have one available. Even then, you can break it down a bit more. Just practice the step-on. Step on, but only with a bit of force, so you then step back off to the rear. You can build up the force as you go, always stopping before you reach "the top", and falling back.

After that, you can follow through, but not try to ride away. Step on, go up to top-dead-center and beyond, to step off the front. You don't even need to put your second foot on the pedal. This is not scary to do on a smaller wheel, especially if you've worked your way there in small increments.

Then repeat on the (or a) bigger wheel. Get comfortable with the dismounts to the rear, and then the front. Being used to making those dismounts will build confidence for the eventual ride-off. Dodgy knee? Try the other one. Clearly the foot that goes first is doing most of the work, so if you aren't too locked into that foot/leg, try the other one. Have I done this? Maybe, but it would have been a long time ago. I'm imagining doing it now, and it's a little intimidating. I might start on a smaller wheel myself!

The last scary part is when you start to focus on the ride-off. If you don't go, you will start to fall to the side. But that happens. Make sure to incorporate it into your practicing. Let the wheel go down, to each side, so you learn how to land that. Or, if you're comfortable with doing hops, try one or two before bailing. Many of my mounts on my 36", with heavy hub and long handlebar, include a little side hop just before I start to ride away. This cancels out a side lean, and gives you more time to ride off in your intended direction without course corrections or flailing.

So try it. Take it slow, concentrate on how to land. Soon it will be a lot less intimidating!
It's my right knee that's dodgy (i'd say due to years and years of volleyball). I always start with left foot first when mounting. Right foot first feels very weird.
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Old 2019-08-29, 08:25 AM   #37
Gockie
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Originally Posted by BruceC View Post
Come on Gockie, I'm sure you said that about static mounts before you started and learnt them just fine.

Seriously, I'm the same position (other than being a woman, and bit past the middle aged tag too) there is a primitive fear factor stopping me from jumping up once the rolling starts. Images of bloody shins and face plants and feet caught in spokes, but don't let me discourage you.
But at least you can freemount the 36er! I'm jealous.

Last edited by Gockie; 2019-08-29 at 08:28 AM.
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Old 2019-08-29, 08:26 AM   #38
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Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by Setonix View Post
Doesn't middle-aged start at 50? I don't feel that old :P
You can start it anytime you like. Or not at all

Last edited by Gockie; 2019-08-29 at 08:27 AM.
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Old 2019-08-29, 08:46 AM   #39
BruceC
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Originally Posted by Gockie View Post
But at least you can freemount the 36er! I'm jealous.
Not well enough to be jealous over! And then there's turning and hopping.... Anyhow, I'd happily swap my past middle age status for your for 36 freemount issues anytime. When you get to my age I am sure I'll see you doing full rolling mounts, with handlebars, backpack and everything else needed to ride all the way around a whole country, this time with hills.

If you are really stuck, time to cut the frame? Have you looked into this further since you first bought the 36"? Last I saw you could do with being slightly lower on the saddle, at least until skills improves.
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Old 2019-08-29, 08:56 AM   #40
Gockie
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Not well enough to be jealous over! And then there's turning and hopping.... Anyhow, I'd happily swap my past middle age status for your for 36 freemount issues anytime. When you get to my age I am sure I'll see you doing full rolling mounts, with handlebars, backpack and everything else needed to ride all the way around a whole country, this time with hills.

If you are really stuck, time to cut the frame? Have you looked into this further since you first bought the 36"? Last I saw you could do with being slightly lower on the saddle, at least until skills improves.
I don't really want to cut the frame.... Now I've currently decided I won't ride it with any cranks longer than 137's.

If I improve and manage the rolling mount, that would be great. But freemounting issues stuck.

A weird thing, it seems I'm now having big issues freemounting my 26" uni, I put handlebars on it 2 days ago. So it's the handlebars that are the problem for me....
And its much better to ride a 36er with handlebars attached.

Last edited by Gockie; 2019-08-29 at 08:57 AM.
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Old 2019-08-29, 02:00 PM   #41
Setonix
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Originally Posted by Gockie View Post
A weird thing, it seems I'm now having big issues freemounting my 26" uni, I put handlebars on it 2 days ago. So it's the handlebars that are the problem for me....
And its much better to ride a 36er with handlebars attached.
Do you hold the handle bars when mounting? I always hold the seat, so with or without handle bars, it will always feel the same.
As for riding, the handle bars on a bigger wheel are nice because it stops the wheel from swaying so much and gives less of a zigzag track. On smaller wheel you have this less anyways. I have a KH26 and the seat is a bit longer than on the Nimbus so I just hold on to that. Did 16km on it last weekend.

Freemounting a smaller wheel always gives some problems at first after riding a bigger wheel for a while, but after riding a few 100 metres, you will get the hang of how it moves and freemounting is back at 99%. I wish it would work like that on the 36".
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Old 2019-08-30, 03:28 AM   #42
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Setonix, I use the rolling mount on my KH29 with handlebars.
I only have one 29" unicycle now but yes, I would use it for any size.
Although, I think the smaller the wheel the less rolling in the mount.

OK... another chance to spread the symmetrical word.

I like John's approach of learning how to fall.
I would add a couple of extra skills to work on.

Learning to mount from any hand or foot position will teach you how to fall from any position as well.

On a smaller wheel I suggest rotating through 4 different mounts. Working to bring up the success rate of each equally.
1-left hand/right foot
2-right hand/left foot
3-left hand/left foot
4-right hand/right foot

Once you get handlebars you can add two handed/left foot and two handed/ right foot.
Now I'll guarantee that when you take these mastered skills to a larger wheel you will just mount and ride away.

I just finished building a 36" wheel for a friend and he let me keep it for a couple of weeks. Between trail, road, or bike path I never had a failed mount in the 10 times or so I tried it. Very first time on a 36er.
I sure wish it had handlebars but it was still very cool to try.

Anyways, it's dorky but I do think it works to make you a better rider.
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Old 2019-08-30, 05:49 AM   #43
Gockie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canoeheadted View Post
On a smaller wheel I suggest rotating through 4 different mounts. Working to bring up the success rate of each equally.
1-left hand/right foot
2-right hand/left foot
3-left hand/left foot
4-right hand/right foot

Once you get handlebars you can add two handed/left foot and two handed/ right foot.
Now I'll guarantee that when you take these mastered skills to a larger wheel you will just mount and ride away.
Sounds good... The practical application is probably not easy though!
Quote:
I just finished building a 36" wheel for a friend and he let me keep it for a couple of weeks. Between trail, road, or bike path I never had a failed mount in the 10 times or so I tried it. Very first time on a 36er.
I am in awe...
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Old 2019-08-30, 09:44 AM   #44
Setonix
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it is good these 36" threads come a long every now and then. They give me an itch to riding it again. Now it is just collecting dust in the shed.
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Old 2019-08-31, 07:14 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gockie View Post
I'm a middle aged woman with a dodgy right knee
Make you mind up: are you middle aged, or are you merely 42?
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