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Old 2019-09-20, 12:51 AM   #1
nyflaz
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Lessons

Anyone from Phoenix willing to provide paid lessons?
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Old 2019-09-20, 07:56 AM   #2
Gockie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nyflaz View Post
Anyone from Phoenix willing to provide paid lessons?
Are you just learning to ride? If so, start with a fence/railing you can slide your hand on top. Have the seat on your uni fairly high, only have a small knee bend at the cranks lowest point. Small unis (like 20") with longish cranks tend to be the easiest for a learner to use.
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Old 2019-09-20, 03:22 PM   #3
JimT
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There likely is no real need for a paid instructor. Spend a little time online by doing a Google search for "How to learn to ride unicycle". There is a ton of support videos and other forms of useful support information.

Here is one site with images, https://www.wikihow.com/Ride-and-Mount-a-Unicycle

There is no real short cut, beginning riders have to be committed and put the time in.
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Old 2019-09-21, 12:26 AM   #4
elpuebloUNIdo
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Originally Posted by JimT View Post
There is no real short cut, beginning riders have to be committed and put the time in.
You have to be committed physically, mentally and emotionally. Physically because learning is going to force you to get in better shape and keep riding when you are sweaty and out of breath. Mentally because unicycling is about problem solving and identifying what worked and what didn't. Emotionally because you have to manage the fear of falling down hard and not get psyched out after a bad fall.

As far as lessons go, tell us about yourself, what you're riding and what your riding conditions are like. We'll give you plenty of advice. Keep in touch!
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Old 2019-09-21, 01:47 AM   #5
OneTrackMind
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Originally Posted by JimT View Post
Not much that would help there. Basically it says to start by sitting on it then try to ride.
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Old 2019-09-22, 03:26 AM   #6
Toofer
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The usual advice is to keep jumping on and falling off until you stop falling off, but I do think at least an informal in-person lesson or two could be very helpful. I'm sure it would have helped me oh-so-many years ago when I learned on my own.
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Old 2019-09-23, 04:09 AM   #7
lowerstackmac
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Originally Posted by Toofer View Post
The usual advice is to keep jumping on and falling off until you stop falling off, but I do think at least an informal in-person lesson or two could be very helpful. I'm sure it would have helped me oh-so-many years ago when I learned on my own.
I agree that having someone that knows how to ride, giving you some on site advice would also be very beneficial.
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Old 2019-09-23, 01:50 PM   #8
nyflaz
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Originally Posted by Gockie View Post
Are you just learning to ride? If so, start with a fence/railing you can slide your hand on top. Have the seat on your uni fairly high, only have a small knee bend at the cranks lowest point. Small unis (like 20") with longish cranks tend to be the easiest for a learner to use.
Thank you for the good advise. I am doing exactly what you offered. I know it takes time but it is great to have a "coach" to critique.
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Old 2019-09-23, 01:51 PM   #9
nyflaz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimT View Post
There likely is no real need for a paid instructor. Spend a little time online by doing a Google search for "How to learn to ride unicycle". There is a ton of support videos and other forms of useful support information.

Here is one site with images, https://www.wikihow.com/Ride-and-Mount-a-Unicycle

There is no real short cut, beginning riders have to be committed and put the time in.
Well stated. I will continue to "get it done".
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Old 2019-09-23, 01:57 PM   #10
nyflaz
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Originally Posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
You have to be committed physically, mentally and emotionally. Physically because learning is going to force you to get in better shape and keep riding when you are sweaty and out of breath. Mentally because unicycling is about problem solving and identifying what worked and what didn't. Emotionally because you have to manage the fear of falling down hard and not get psyched out after a bad fall.

As far as lessons go, tell us about yourself, what you're riding and what your riding conditions are like. We'll give you plenty of advice. Keep in touch!
I know I need to put in my hours to learn. A "critique" from an experienced rider would help so I don't learn "bad habits".
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Old 2019-09-23, 01:58 PM   #11
nyflaz
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Originally Posted by lowerstackmac View Post
I agree that having someone that knows how to ride, giving you some on site advice would also be very beneficial.
I don't mind the failing part but want to learn correctly to "fall off less".
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Old 2019-09-23, 07:04 PM   #12
AzTinbender
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I'm in Chandler and always willing to ride with most anyone. What part of Phoenix are you in?
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Old 2019-09-23, 10:32 PM   #13
elpuebloUNIdo
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Originally Posted by nyflaz View Post
I don't mind the failing part but want to learn correctly to "fall off less".
It's not about falling off less. It's about landing on your feet more.
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Old 2019-09-24, 03:50 AM   #14
slamdance
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Big decision $$ or $$$

So, I think the fact that you found unicycle.com and asking for help is great. Most people don't even do this, but here's the real decision.

Should I spend $50 for an amazon cheapie 20" unicycle, or $125 for a decent solid unicycle. (I'm guessing you've done the research, and there's only one size to start...no debate 20").

Here's my experience:
1.) Bought a 24" amazon cheapier for $50. Tried, tried and failed miserably for 50 hrs. Every time it fell the seat would twist and the "single" seatpost clamp was crap. later, the cranks started coming off and I could not find a good nut/washer replacement. The nut was non-standard and required a special socket wrench, so I just somehow managed with needle nose pliers.

2.) At the same time, I was researching a lot on the internet and the light bulb went off in my head. I needed a smaller unicycle and since my amazon crappie was falling apart. I learned of more "sturdier" training unicycles like the Torker brand, which are built like a tank with seat post clamp that used 2 x 5MM soc hds and also had "standard" bmx type pedals. Got this and within 20 hrs I started to ride!!! Ofcourse, it wasn't instant and a lot of "falls later"...but I didn't have to keep checking the pedals or adjusting the seat after each fall.

The moral of the story is don't go cheap. Keep on.

Last edited by slamdance; 2019-09-24 at 03:51 AM.
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Old 2019-09-24, 10:24 AM   #15
Setonix
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I don't mind giving you paid lessons. I charge 10 EUR or dollars what you like per hour. It took me 3 weeks of training 2 hours a day to learn to go my first 100 or more metres. So 3 * 7 * 2 = 42 hours * 10 EUR. That earns me enough money to buy a new unicycle...... but it is you who needs a new uni

A Nimbus Freestyle 20" fits nicely in that amount of money. So better spend it on the uni and learn with help from youtube. I'm sure you can do it.
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