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Old 2017-11-25, 09:08 PM   #16
Mikefule
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So in the meantime, let's enjoy and ride what we have!
I'll second that.
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Old 2017-11-25, 11:08 PM   #17
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Haven't given geared hubs much thought yet, as still in the beginner stage. Still having mixed feelings about the idea that disk brakes are now considered a necessity for serious riding. Something else to break and wear out that needs maintenance. Then I saw the cost of the schlumph hub is around that of 2 high end brake equipped unicycles not including wheel building, and read that some folks have worn out more than one.

I was attracted to unicycling for the space saving hardware simplicity and significantly lower cost than cycling and motorcycling among other reasons like improving balance and learning a new skill. So I think I would also rather buy a pair of new unicycles in different wheel sizes. Not sure the outcome of having an UPD on a geared 36 while going as fast as possible would be particularly enjoyable, but don't know all the details yet.

I have some background in moto trials, so I am not into speed, and used to enjoy the challenge of analyzing and conquering rough terrain. I anticipate getting into Muni and Trials as I progress. Others into speed might have a different perspective.
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Old 2017-11-25, 11:45 PM   #18
elpuebloUNIdo
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The geared build that I enjoyed the most and had the most fun on was a 2008 KH 24" with Schlumpf mountain geared hub and 150mm cranks. I'm not saying it was the fastest or best size for you or anyone else. Just the most fun to ride. If you (and everyone else) are not interested in fun don't ready any further.
My Schlumpf is currently installed in a 19" trials unicycle. My plan is to become comfortable using the G19 before installing the geared hub into a larger wheel. I have had some pretty fun rides on my G19. I've achieved greater speed on the G19 that I ever did on my 29" unicycle. I took it on a few muni rides, and it was not bad. I swapped out a seat with bar ends, and that helped me plow over obstacles without having the small wheel kicked out from under me.

My struggles with the Schlumpf are as follows: 1. It adds significant weight. 2. I have had continuing problems with the cranks/crank-bolts coming loose. 3. Sudden, unexpected shifting is really not fun. Concerning this last issue, I think the G19 is more susceptible to random shifting to the extent that the rider is more likely to turn the unicycle suddenly, causing the heel to inadvertently push a shift button. I tend to initiate sudden turns with my hands on the bar ends, rather than my feet, resulting in the unicycle turning and the feet shifting relative to the pedals. UPD-City. I spoke with LanceB about unintentional shifting. Lance has a G32, and he told me he never accidentally shifted. I couldn't believe it. Either something was wrong with my Schlumpf, or my feet are all over the place.

Anyhow, once I get more comfortable with the G19, I'm going to install the hub into a 24" unicycle. There is hill climbing in my neighborhood I can just barely do on my 26" muni, so I figure, with a 24" and the added weight of the hub, maybe I'd be able to ride the same hills on the G24 in low gear.

If I had to do it over again, I'm not sure I'd buy the Schlumpf. I don't exactly have buyer's remorse, but I recognize now that the geared hub adds a whole bunch of complexity to the setup. I wouldn't recommend it for a beginner.
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Old 2017-11-26, 02:17 AM   #19
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Still having mixed feelings about the idea that disk brakes are now considered a necessity for serious riding....

...I was attracted to unicycling for the space saving hardware simplicity
The simplicity is still there. No one else should define what you need for what you consider to be a serious ride for you.

This is an aspect of what we were discussing previously: one group of people encouraging another group to feel that their preferred level of complexity is necessary for other people when it isn't.

The seriousness of a ride is related to the sense of achievement at the end, which in turn arises in part from the difficulty, and is very personal. The overweight 50 year old may consider 5 miles of smooth road serious and the fit 24 year old may regard 10 miles of cross country as no more than a training ride.

If a brake makes a given ride significantly easier, it makes that ride less "serious". If it makes an otherwise impossible ride possible, it becomes a real benefit.

I am probably not in the top 50% in this forum in terms of technical ability or achievement., but I refuse to accept that my biggest achievements are somehow devalued because I might have done more or better if I'd had a brake, and certainly not because someone else considers a brake essential.

Apart from which, we should be cautious about using "serious" too often in connection with riding a one wheeled bike for fun.
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Old 2017-11-26, 04:41 AM   #20
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I think unicycling should start out as a low cost endeavour requiring basic but sturdy equipment, a high level of skill must be developed just to do the most basic fundamentals.

As far as I am concerned, being able to freemount, ride forward straight and turn properly, idle and go backwards without falling down on flat ground requires a high level of skill and physical fitness. This can only come from a significant investment of persitent time and effort.

There are plenty of skills to become proficient in long before the use of brakes, gears and other gizmos like electric boost add significant cost while taking away the simplicity of the hardware.

Brakes are affordable for most unicyclists. I am disspointed in the high cost of the Sclumpf hub, but it seems to be the only sensible option currently available for those that want more gears.
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Old 2017-11-26, 05:41 AM   #21
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My g36er does climbs beautifully and lite muni, even on 127mm on this ride, Im on low gear of course. Ive gotten so used it that it barely feels any different from my standard build. If I drop it to 150 or 165mm Im sure I can even take on the rock gardens. Its currently doing about 70% of the trails that I'd normally will take the 26", or 85% of the 29er. The 36er is alot more capable than most people give it a chance for.


Before getting my Schlumpf I contemplated between building a G29 or G36. Absolutely no regrets purchasing and jumping onto the g36. Though, when I find the budget, I will build another, either a g26 or g29. They are just simply awesome in versatility.

As far a brakes goes, (especially) disc brakes are the bomb. I didnt need them when learning, but then, the better I get, the more I realize I need them to get to the next level of riding.
I settled for a used older KH36, without the disc brake tabs but a magura. Its not bad, but disc brakes are super smooth, no undulations, more control and braking power.

I tend to differ with some others opinions.... My first wheel was the UDC chrome 20". Afterwards I knew I was hooked. I opted to go for the top line, and KH line with brakes does it for me. I dont like wasting time on selling and upgrading, for me its a waste of money and effort. (Particularly me, Im not good at selling and better at giving it away, whatever it is, I always end up losing money) Just go for the best you can afford and be settled with it. Good unis are, afterall, unbelievably durable , mind settling healthy, and nearly maintenance free.

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Old 2017-11-26, 06:20 AM   #22
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A bit off topic:
UPD have you tried grey pads instead of the black ones on your G36 (or on another of your unis) ?
I have two HS33 (on my G36 and my 29+) and I did this change since grey pads are harder than black ones thus they are more progressive, maybe not as smooth as disc brakes (I don't have any DB for now to make the comparison) but still smoother than the black rubber of the original HS33 pads.
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Old 2017-11-26, 06:34 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by UniDreamerFR View Post
A bit off topic:
UPD have you tried grey pads instead of the black ones on your G36 (or on another of your unis) ?
I have two HS33 (on my G36 and my 29+) and I did this change since grey pads are harder than black ones thus they are more progressive, maybe not as smooth as disc brakes (I don't have any DB for now to make the comparison) but still smoother than the black rubber of the original HS33 pads.
I didnt know they have grey, I might try. Thanks for the info.
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Old 2017-11-26, 07:46 AM   #24
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Im sure I can even take on the rock gardens. Its currently doing about 70% of the trails that I'd normally will take the 26", or 85% of the 29er. The 36er is alot more capable than most people give it a chance for...
You're right, in the right context. And 70% leaves 30%, of course.

I have ridden many miles off road on 36 inch. If you have space to manoeuvre and choose your line, it can be brilliant. Although you lose the torque to go up the very steepest stuff, you get in return the ability to rush obstacles and let momentum and the "rollover" of the big wheel carry you.

Where the bigger wheels fail is when your room for manoeuvre is seriously constrained. Tight single track footpaths with ruts and roots, 90 degree bends, and bushes closing in on each side and low branches that you have to duck under. Sooner or later, you reach a stage where all the little compensations of position and balance have been used up and you have nowhere left to go.

I suppose it depends on what your local riding opportunities are. Near my previous address, with river banks and the landscaped humps of the local country park, it was brilliant. Where I am now, the 24 or 29 can get me access that would either be impossible or exhausting on a 36.
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Old 2017-11-26, 05:17 PM   #25
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I tend to differ with some others opinions.... My first wheel was the UDC chrome 20". Afterwards I knew I was hooked. I opted to go for the top line, and KH line with brakes does it for me. I dont like wasting time on selling and upgrading, for me its a waste of money and effort. (Particularly me, Im not good at selling and better at giving it away, whatever it is, I always end up losing money) Just go for the best you can afford and be settled with it. Good unis are, afterall, unbelievably durable , mind settling healthy, and nearly maintenance free.
I agree with buying the best made longest lasting stuff you can afford.

Buy nice, or buy twice.
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Old 2017-11-26, 07:51 PM   #26
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15% - 30% is where my real fun is…

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My g36er does climbs beautifully and lite muni, even on 127mm on this ride, Im on low gear of course. Ive gotten so used it that it barely feels any different from my standard build. If I drop it to 150 or 165mm Im sure I can even take on the rock gardens. Its currently doing about 70% of the trails that I'd normally will take the 26", or 85% of the 29er. The 36er is alot more capable than most people give it a chance for.
We had a very experienced unicyclist bring a 36 to Bellingham Unicycle Weekend on year. He insisted on riding it one of the days. So he went on the bunny trails with a few others as the main group went out to only ride the 15% to 30% you walk. Which group do you think got to ride with Kris Holm that day?

Some of us only put up with the 70% to 85% to get to the challenging conditions others walk. Some come with very cocky attitudes to ride our trails and walk most or almost all day. We are still glad to have them come and enjoy helping them. Some return and ride more each time, learning and building confidence. No one has returned with a 36 to ride muni with us. Some of them and us own 36 guni but save them for the road and cycle paths. If we lived somewhere else maybe they would see more trail time.

But what works for you and puts a smile from ear-to-ear on your face is what should motivate you, not what puts a smile from ear-to-ear on me.

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Old 2017-11-26, 08:43 PM   #27
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Hey guys, not trying to impose on anybody's egos. I did say 'lite' muni. The park that I ride is not super tough. It is narrow single tracks that Im riding on. Afterall, I did ride the same trails over 50xs on the 26 and 29, after a while it just feels more fun on the flowy 36er. I can do some rock gardens that Ive memorized, with the 36 /150mm, tough and challenging, but not impossible. Now as for unfamiliar terrain, of course I will want to first practice with the 29 or 26.
...all Im trying to say is, break the stigma, the the 36er is a lot more capable offroads than most people give it credit for, that's all. Im having a blast...I guess that's all it matters though..😄
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Old 2017-11-27, 04:27 AM   #28
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Bungeejoe, so sorry to hear about your Lanaboos. And of course she is your Lois Lane.
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However, in the hypothetical world where I won the lottery despite not buying a ticket...
But I used to get email about that ALL THE TIME!! Many were even from the UK! Sorry you never won for realz...
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Then I saw the cost of the schlumph hub is around that of 2 high end brake equipped unicycles not including wheel building, and read that some folks have worn out more than one.
Yep, they're expensive because they are basically handmade, and in Switzerland/Germany, where labor is pricey. Because they are made in very small numbers, there's no economy of scale to bring costs down. Years ago, there was an effort to find a low-cost (China, Taiwan) manufacturer for Harper's geared design, but they never produced any prototypes of decent quality.

That said, I've never worn one out, though my first one did break on me and have to get warranty repair (which took more than half a year, because it was basically a wait for the next batch to be completed). Bungeejoe rides A LOT, but I haven't heard about many other people wearing them out yet.
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Not sure the outcome of having an UPD on a geared 36 while going as fast as possible would be particularly enjoyable, but don't know all the details yet.
I think it would be in the ballpark of a relatively low speed motorcycle crash, on whatever your riding surface, adding 2-3 feet in height of the motorcycle's seat. Though it could be a lot worse, such as blowing out your hip bone as happened at NAUCC this year. Upping speed is upping kinetic energy; I still believe that anything faster than one's top running speed is inherently dangerous on a unicycle.
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Afterall, I did ride the same trails over 50xs on the 26 and 29, after a while it just feels more fun on the flowy 36er.
There's definitely something to be said for riding the same terrain on different sized wheels. The 36" can be super-fun on fast singletrack, where you can really take advantage of that big wheel, that's where it shines the best. While it can be amazing the kind of terriain you can ride one on, it's a lot of weight and size to drag around as well. I like it better for fast trails.

For Klaas (and anyone who remember the original topic), I would boil down all the advice in here to the question of 26" vs. 27.5". Is 26" really going away? Really? Hard to tell, I guess. If 27.5 does start to become the new 26" (or if it already has), 26" tires will be around for many more years, but when they do start to dry up, it may seem to happen suddenly. There is a simple solution to that: Find the tire you like the most, and then buy 3 or 4 of them, and store them away from sunlight. I highly recommend the Surly Knard 26 x 3.0 that came with my KH 26" last year. I think it's magic, once you get the pressure dialed to match the terrain. And it's so much lighter than the tires I've had on my old 24" Wilder!

Or just go with the 27.5", since the difference, I'm told, is minimal. I don't have a mental picture of what trails would be like in your area, but my understanding of Holland is flat-ish, so a tiny size-up is probably fine.
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