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Old 2001-10-12, 03:15 PM   #1
Sarah Miller
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The oct 27th Uni Meet in Kidderminster (UK) will have a halloween theme.
So heres your chance to run up a unicycleable halloween costume and take
part in the fancy dress parade, a game of Quiditch and some halloween
games as well as the more normall uni meet activities of Hockey,Basketball
and workshops.

The timetable for the days events is ( roughly)

10am warm up, followed by workshops and practise space , Steve Grainger
will run a begnners workshop , so if you need help getting started come
to this one.

11-12 Basketball , try out some basketball skills and play a short game.

12.30 Fancy dress parade, with a small prize for the best Unicycling
Witch, Wizard, Ghost or Ghoul.

1pm Quiditch, the well know broom stick sport from the Harry Potter
books. Following the try out we gave this game in April the unicycle
quidditch rules have been refined and its time to take to the air on our
unicycles for some wizard fun. Chasing Quaffles, Bludgers and seeking the
Golden Snitch.

2-4 Unicycle Hockey in the sports hall, no need to have played before, we
muddle the players up to create even(ish) teams. 2-5 Trials, outside, hit
the jumps and bumps.Will has some ideas for uni trials levels to try out.

5-6 Workshops including basics of Uni barn dancing in preparation for the
December uni meet dance.

6pm Raffle draw, a chance to win some werid and wonderfull raffle prizes

6-7 Halloween Games , Apple bobbing, Shuntbumps, rattley chain tag , and
other uni games with a halloween twist.

7-8 free style practise, if you are working on something for Unicon next
year why not take this oppotunity to practise in public and get some feed
back from an audiance.

8pm Home time.

As usual the cost is 8ukp with the option of staying over and taking
part in the sunday circus club for a few quid more. All levels of rider
are welcome, from the seriously wobbly to the super speedy. The uni
meet is a great oppotunity to try out different unis and get tips from
other riders.

The Harry Cheshire High School Sports Hall is off Habberley Rd in
Kidderminster and a map can be found here http://www.streetmap.co.uk/stre-
etmap.dll?grid2map?x=381750&y=276750&zoom=1&
isp=200&ism=500&arrow=y?86,114

The December 1st Uni meet will be athe same venue, starting at 10am and
ending with a unicycle Chelidh ( Barn dance) with the dance band herbal
remedy and caller Dave Hunt. The December meet will cost 10ukp ( including
the dance) and dance only tickets will be avalible for non riders who want
to come and join in in the evening.

For more info on Kidderminster Uni Meets contact Steve Grainger on
Tel/Fax: 01432 890634 Mobile:07970 107845 Email:stevegrain@aol.com

sarah
--
Unicycle-Meets , Hockey, Basketball, games & workshops Saturday Oct 27th
and Dec 1st Harry Cheshire High School, Habberley rd, Kidderminster
e-mail stevegrain@aol.com for details
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Old 2001-10-13, 10:12 PM   #2
Arnold the Aardvark
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[color=blue]> 1pm Quiditch, the well know broom stick sport from the Harry Potter[/color]
[color=blue]> books. Following the try out we gave this game in April the unicycle[/color]
[color=blue]> quidditch rules have been refined and its time to take to the air on our[/color]
[color=blue]> unicycles for some wizard fun. Chasing Quaffles, Bludgers and seeking[/color]
[color=blue]> the Golden Snitch.[/color]

I know I must be the only person this side of the Small Magellanic
Cloud not to have read Harry Potter, but please have some sympathy when
I ask: Quaffles?

I hope the rules are simple enough for a hapless skill-challenged aardvark
to follow.

Arnold the Aardvark

British Unicycle Convention 9: Kidderminster, 19-21 April 2002
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Old 2001-10-13, 10:46 PM   #3
Steve
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Age: 35
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Halloween in the UK? I didn't think that you celebrated it over there. I guess that you learn something new every day.

Steve
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Old 2001-10-14, 11:30 AM   #4
Arnold the Aardvark
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http://atdpweb.soe.berkeley.edu/2030...en_origin.html
http://www.siliconglen.com/scotfaq/12_19.html

Americans! <eyes rolling>.

When I was a child in Scotland there was no "trick or treat", children
would instead do something more akin to carol singing ("guising"),
actually earning their treat. Call me a grumpy old git, but I think that
was better than a bunch of smelly little squits attempting to extort money
from householders, which is what happens in England these days - yet
another unwelcome invasion of American "culture".

<vague-effort-to-stay-on-topic> Why don't we introduce "trick *and*
treat": we give them a treat if the sprogs perfom a trick. I have a
selection of unicycles they can use... </vague-effort-to-stay-on-topic>

Arnold the Aardvark

British Unicycle Convention 9: Kidderminster, 19-21 April 2002
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Old 2001-10-14, 11:35 AM   #5
Sarah Miller
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Arnold the Aardvark <aardvark@notthistubulidentata.demon.co.uk> wrote:

[color=blue]> I know I must be the only person this side of the Small Magellanic Cloud[/color]
[color=blue]> not to have read Harry Potter, but please have some sympathy when I ask:[/color]
[color=blue]> Quaffles?[/color]

[color=blue]> I hope the rules are simple enough for a hapless skill-challenged[/color]
[color=blue]> aardvark to follow.[/color]

I'll attempt to get the revised Unicycle Quidditch rules typed up this
evening, then post them somewhere usefull. Yesterday I finished making the
goal inserts.

But briefly Quidditch is played by two teams of 7, using 4 balls ( 1
quaffle ,2 Bludgers and a golden snitch). Points are gained by scoring
goals with the quaffle or catching the golden snitch. Bludgers are used to
try and prevent the other side scoring.

It should be playable by a compleate muggle, but Potter readers might
catch onto the terminology quicker!

sarah

--
Unicycle-Meets , Hockey, Basketball, games & workshops Saturday Oct 27th
and Dec 1st Harry Cheshire High School, Habberley rd, Kidderminster
e-mail stevegrain@aol.com for details
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Old 2001-10-14, 01:14 PM   #6
Sarah Miller
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Arnold the Aardvark <aardvark@notthistubulidentata.demon.co.uk> wrote:
[color=blue]> Americans! <eyes rolling>. When I was a child in Scotland there was no[/color]
[color=blue]> "trick or treat", children would instead do something more akin to carol[/color]
[color=blue]> singing ("guising"), actually earning their treat. Call me a grumpy old[/color]
[color=blue]> git, but I think that was better than a bunch of smelly little squits[/color]
[color=blue]> attempting to extort money from householders, which is what happens[/color]

My brother and I as children were not allowed to go out trick/treating,
BUT we were allowed to water bomb any other kids who came calling at our
or our neighbours door that night. Great fun expect for the cleaning up of
green paint the little gits smeared on the neighbours door one year in
retaliation.

sarah
--
Unicycle-Meets , Hockey, Basketball, games & workshops Saturday Oct 27th
and Dec 1st Harry Cheshire High School, Habberley rd, Kidderminster
e-mail stevegrain@aol.com for details
  Reply With Quote
Old 2001-10-14, 01:14 PM   #7
Sarah Miller
Newsgroup User
 
Posts: n/a
Arnold the Aardvark <aardvark@notthistubulidentata.demon.co.uk> wrote:
[color=blue]> Americans! <eyes rolling>. When I was a child in Scotland there was no[/color]
[color=blue]> "trick or treat", children would instead do something more akin to carol[/color]
[color=blue]> singing ("guising"), actually earning their treat. Call me a grumpy old[/color]
[color=blue]> git, but I think that was better than a bunch of smelly little squits[/color]
[color=blue]> attempting to extort money from householders, which is what happens[/color]

My brother and I as children were not allowed to go out trick/treating,
BUT we were allowed to water bomb any other kids who came calling at our
or our neighbours door that night. Great fun expect for the cleaning up of
green paint the little gits smeared on the neighbours door one year in
retaliation.

sarah
--
Unicycle-Meets , Hockey, Basketball, games & workshops Saturday Oct 27th
and Dec 1st Harry Cheshire High School, Habberley rd, Kidderminster
e-mail stevegrain@aol.com for details
  Reply With Quote
Old 2001-10-15, 05:56 PM   #8
Danny Colyer
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Posts: n/a
John Foss wrote:
[color=blue]> Don't feel bad. On most US maps, the rest of the world isn't even there,[/color]
[color=blue]> save for parts of Canada and Mexico! :-)[/color]

I saw a US world map the other day, where the Americas were in the centre,
instead of the Greenwich Meridian. It looked really weird.

--
Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny )
Recumbent bikes page: http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "Make
it idiot-proof and someone will build a better idiot."
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Old 2001-10-15, 09:48 PM   #9
Danny Colyer
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Nathan Hoover wrote:
[color=blue]> The ones with southern hemisphere countries such as New Zealand in the[/color]
[color=blue]> middle also look strange to us, but think about it - if you're making a[/color]
map
[color=blue]> for your country, why would you put it off to the side somewhere? If[/color]
Fijian
[color=blue]> maps were centered on something arbitrary like the Greenwich Meridian,[/color]
[color=blue]> the country be split in half.[/color]

The ones that look strangest are the really old ones. Before compasses
were readily available (i.e. about 1000 years ago), British maps
conventionally had East at the top (presumably because that's where the
sun rises). A map of the British isles with East at the top looks
distinctly odd to someone used to seeing North at the top.

Of course, world maps in those days didn't include New Zealand or
the Americas!

--
Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny )
Recumbent bikes page: http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "Make
it idiot-proof and someone will build a better idiot."
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Old 2001-10-15, 09:48 PM   #10
Danny Colyer
Newsgroup User
 
Posts: n/a
Nathan Hoover wrote:
[color=blue]> The ones with southern hemisphere countries such as New Zealand in the[/color]
[color=blue]> middle also look strange to us, but think about it - if you're making a[/color]
map
[color=blue]> for your country, why would you put it off to the side somewhere? If[/color]
Fijian
[color=blue]> maps were centered on something arbitrary like the Greenwich Meridian,[/color]
[color=blue]> the country be split in half.[/color]

The ones that look strangest are the really old ones. Before compasses
were readily available (i.e. about 1000 years ago), British maps
conventionally had East at the top (presumably because that's where the
sun rises). A map of the British isles with East at the top looks
distinctly odd to someone used to seeing North at the top.

Of course, world maps in those days didn't include New Zealand or
the Americas!

--
Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny )
Recumbent bikes page: http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "Make
it idiot-proof and someone will build a better idiot."
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Old 2001-10-16, 08:08 PM   #11
Nathan Hoover
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Posts: n/a
Last year on Halloween, when my son rode up to a house and said, "Trick or
Treat", he was asked to do a trick. So he rode off the porch (several
large high stairs) to the amazment of the people at the door. He scored
quite a bit of candy at that house! He performed like that several times
during the evening.

This was in America. Why are the kids particularly smelly in England? When
we sent out our Halloween culture to take over the world, I thought we
specified that the kids were supposed to be clean. Wasn't that right?

---Nathan

"Arnold the Aardvark" <aardvark@NOTTHIStubulidentata.demon.co.uk> wrote in
message news:1003059105.16487.0.nnrp-01.c1ed...ws.demon.co.uk...
[color=blue]> http://atdpweb.soe.berkeley.edu/2030...en_origin.html[/color]
[color=blue]> http://www.siliconglen.com/scotfaq/12_19.html[/color]
[color=blue]>[/color]
[color=blue]> Americans! <eyes rolling>.[/color]
[color=blue]>[/color]
[color=blue]> When I was a child in Scotland there was no "trick or treat", children[/color]
would
[color=blue]> instead do something more akin to carol singing ("guising"), actually[/color]
[color=blue]> earning their treat. Call me a grumpy old git, but I think that was[/color]
[color=blue]> better than a bunch of[/color]
smelly
[color=blue]> little squits attempting to extort money from householders, which is[/color]
[color=blue]> what happens in England these days - yet another unwelcome invasion of[/color]
[color=blue]> American "culture".[/color]
[color=blue]>[/color]
[color=blue]> <vague-effort-to-stay-on-topic> Why don't we introduce "trick *and*[/color]
[color=blue]> treat": we give them a treat if the sprogs perfom a trick. I have a[/color]
[color=blue]> selection of unicycles they can use... [/color]
[color=blue]> </vague-effort-to-stay-on-topic>[/color]
[color=blue]>[/color]
[color=blue]>[/color]
[color=blue]> Arnold the Aardvark[/color]
[color=blue]>[/color]
[color=blue]> British Unicycle Convention 9: Kidderminster, 19-21 April 2002[/color]
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Old 2001-10-16, 08:08 PM   #12
Nathan Hoover
Newsgroup User
 
Posts: n/a
Last year on Halloween, when my son rode up to a house and said, "Trick or
Treat", he was asked to do a trick. So he rode off the porch (several
large high stairs) to the amazment of the people at the door. He scored
quite a bit of candy at that house! He performed like that several times
during the evening.

This was in America. Why are the kids particularly smelly in England? When
we sent out our Halloween culture to take over the world, I thought we
specified that the kids were supposed to be clean. Wasn't that right?

---Nathan

"Arnold the Aardvark" <aardvark@NOTTHIStubulidentata.demon.co.uk> wrote in
message news:1003059105.16487.0.nnrp-01.c1ed...ws.demon.co.uk...
[color=blue]> http://atdpweb.soe.berkeley.edu/2030...en_origin.html[/color]
[color=blue]> http://www.siliconglen.com/scotfaq/12_19.html[/color]
[color=blue]>[/color]
[color=blue]> Americans! <eyes rolling>.[/color]
[color=blue]>[/color]
[color=blue]> When I was a child in Scotland there was no "trick or treat", children[/color]
would
[color=blue]> instead do something more akin to carol singing ("guising"), actually[/color]
[color=blue]> earning their treat. Call me a grumpy old git, but I think that was[/color]
[color=blue]> better than a bunch of[/color]
smelly
[color=blue]> little squits attempting to extort money from householders, which is[/color]
[color=blue]> what happens in England these days - yet another unwelcome invasion of[/color]
[color=blue]> American "culture".[/color]
[color=blue]>[/color]
[color=blue]> <vague-effort-to-stay-on-topic> Why don't we introduce "trick *and*[/color]
[color=blue]> treat": we give them a treat if the sprogs perfom a trick. I have a[/color]
[color=blue]> selection of unicycles they can use... [/color]
[color=blue]> </vague-effort-to-stay-on-topic>[/color]
[color=blue]>[/color]
[color=blue]>[/color]
[color=blue]> Arnold the Aardvark[/color]
[color=blue]>[/color]
[color=blue]> British Unicycle Convention 9: Kidderminster, 19-21 April 2002[/color]
  Reply With Quote
Old 2001-10-17, 01:01 AM   #13
Klaas Bil
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On Tue, 16 Oct 2001 13:08:37 -0700, "Nathan Hoover"
<nathan@movaris.com> wrote:

[color=blue]>This was in America. Why are the kids particularly smelly in England?[/color]
[color=blue]>When we sent out our Halloween culture to take over the world, I thought[/color]
[color=blue]>we specified that the kids were supposed to be clean. Wasn't that right?[/color]

I'm afraid I don't get this at all. Smelly? How literally should I take
that? And then again, I've always thought that Halloween is a derivative
of the Dutch St. Maarten festive day, so WE sort of sent something out to
take over the world. Oh well, this may be a severe case of Dutchentrism...
[color=blue]:-) On Dutch maps, we are at the centre of the world...[/color]

Klaas Bil
--
"To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:" "espionage, Branch Davidian, Cuba"
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Old 2001-10-17, 03:36 AM   #14
harper
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Old 2001-10-17, 04:24 PM   #15
John Foss
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[color=blue]> something out to take over the world. Oh well, this may be a severe case[/color]
[color=blue]> of Dutchentrism... :-) On Dutch maps, we are at the centre of the[/color]
[color=blue]> world...[/color]

Don't feel bad. On most US maps, the rest of the world isn't even there,
save for parts of Canada and Mexico! :-)

JF
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