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Old 2019-04-17, 07:18 AM   #106
finnspin
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The side you learned first will likely always be your stronger side. There is no natural "dominant" or "non dominant" side like there is with hands.

My take on symmetry is: it's generally better to learn one side properly first, rather than try to learn both at once. The things you learned on one side can be applied to the other side. For example, when freemounting, the motion of your upper body stays the same on either side. When you then try your worse foot, you can already apply what you learned about that.
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Old 2019-04-17, 07:40 AM   #107
Garp
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Originally Posted by finnspin View Post
The side you learned first will likely always be your stronger side. There is no natural "dominant" or "non dominant" side like there is with hands.

My take on symmetry is: it's generally better to learn one side properly first, rather than try to learn both at once. The things you learned on one side can be applied to the other side. For example, when freemounting, the motion of your upper body stays the same on either side. When you then try your worse foot, you can already apply what you learned about that.
There are things I learned as a kid or a teenager first fully on one side, like cartwheels, judo rolls, etc. After that, no amount of practice on the other side could catch up with the first. As you said in your first sentence, The side you learned first will likely always be your stronger side.

Conversely, I don't think there's any requirement with unicycling to be able to do things equally well on both sides, other than some intellectual satisfaction (and competitive freestyle, maybe?)
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Old 2019-04-17, 08:01 AM   #108
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Originally Posted by Garp View Post

Conversely, I don't think there's any requirement with unicycling to be able to do things equally well on both sides, other than some intellectual satisfaction (and competitive freestyle, maybe?)
An example where it would definitely help:
Being able to do a good (rolling) hop with either foot forward would be a great benefit in Muni or Trials
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Old 2019-04-17, 08:56 AM   #109
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An example where it would definitely help:
Being able to do a good (rolling) hop with either foot forward would be a great benefit in Muni or Trials
Most trials riders can do little hops with their wrong foot forward, but line up the hops to have their better one forward for big hops. It's generally pretty easy to do, just do a half rev, or hop forward on a rail instead of riding when you see it won't line up.

For Muni, it's nice. But no one is perfectly symmetrical. For example, I can hop over trees fallen over the trail that are up to ~30cm high with either foot. With my better foot forward, I can probably get up to 60cm. I much prefer that over being "perfectly symmetrical". Adding curves/hops to get your cranks to line up is very doable with some practice.

Being perfectly symmetrical is just a "spiritual" thing, that some believe to be very healthy if you do it with everything in life. It's definetely not required to be a good unicyclist.
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Old 2019-04-17, 01:46 PM   #110
elpuebloUNIdo
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Originally Posted by finnspin View Post
The side you learned first will likely always be your stronger side. There is no natural "dominant" or "non dominant" side like there is with hands.
I think riders on this forum use "strong/weak" and "dominant/non-dominant" interchangeably.

To suggest there is no practical reason to practice on both sides...begs the question why we are unicycling in the first place.
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Old 2019-04-17, 10:16 PM   #111
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I think riders on this forum use "strong/weak" and "dominant/non-dominant" interchangeably.
I know, but I'm saying that's not good terminology. Dominant suggests a similarity to left/right-handedness, which it's not. Someone who learned to write with their non dominant hand will be inherently less comfortable doing so then if they were using their dominant side. With mounting/hopping, it just that the side you started practicing on becomes better, at least in my experience.

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To suggest there is no practical reason to practice on both sides...begs the question why we are unicycling in the first place.
I didn't say there is no reason to practice both sides. I won't stop anyone from doing what they want. But for what most people's goals are, "perfect" symmetry is not required. That's all I said, and I gave some examples on why I think that's the case.

Unicyclists tend to be a little "special", but in the end, most of us aren't that different from people in other sports. With Golf for example, 99,9% of people try and do the same course with as few shots as possible, and do not care if they are able to do it with either side. Similar with unicycling. If you learn how to do a glide, that's a pretty cool feeling. After that, most people would set their sights on a new challenge, maybe coasting, and not try with the other foot. To get my point complete: there are occasions, where some symmetry is necessary. For example, when coasting, I have my right foot on the frame, left foot extended as balance. That makes it hard to turn right, so I'm practicing having my right foot extended and left foot on the frame, so I can turn either way. Rolling hop in Muni is another example where symmetry is good for most peoples goal of hopping over stuff on the trail.
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Old 2019-04-18, 12:50 AM   #112
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...begs the question why we are unicycling in the first place.
Probably for the same reason we climb mountains: it's idiotic, useless and potentially dangerous. So of course some of us have to do it.
Mankind, the smart species
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Old 2019-04-18, 06:06 AM   #113
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...begs the question why we are unicycling in the first place.
Because it is possible. And so much fun.
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Old 2019-04-18, 02:39 PM   #114
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Thanks, Pierrox, elpuebloUNIdo and everyone else for your responses. Lots to digest and so much to learn about unis in general. Mostly lots of practice coming up. Iíll let you know how it goes. Cheers all
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Old 2019-05-20, 12:24 AM   #115
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Smile

Iím still at it. I did buy an Impact Athmos 19Ē a few weeks ago. Iím glad I did, I wish I had started on a small one. It certainly is easier to ride than the 26Ē Nimbus. It felt weird riding it and took a bit to get used to it though. My free mounts on it are up to about 80% Iíd guess. Riding it on my gravel driveway and road still sucks of course. I go back and forth practicing on the two unis and I find that my free mounting success on the 26Ē has also gone way up. I think my riding has also benefited.

Unfortunately I think I might have broken a bone on the top of my right foot a few days ago. I didnít notice when it happened, it just got progressively more swollen and hurt more over a few days. I think once it gets better líll start practicing in town in a parking lot or somewhere flat for a while. These small injuries are certainly frustrating, as Iím sure most of you know. Anyhow, Iím still keen to get good at this before I run out of birthdays. Cheers all.
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Old 2019-05-20, 03:59 AM   #116
elpuebloUNIdo
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Riding it on my gravel driveway and road still sucks of course.
Focus on getting one hand pulling on the seat handle while riding your 19" on gravel. With some practice, you'll compensate, using "plough-through" technique for what you are missing in "roll over" ability.

Sorry about your foot. My worst unicycle injury was a broken big toe.
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Old 2019-05-20, 06:34 AM   #117
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elpuebloUNIdo, yes I have been riding with one hand on my seat for quite a while now. I have not been using a Ďpulling upí technique though, just holding on. Do you pull up continuously, or only as you come to ruts, irregularities, stones etc.? Iíll focus on that once Iím back in the saddle.

The injury seems to involve my big toe as well. Hopefully lím like you, in that thatís the worst I encounter in my uni career.
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Old 2019-05-20, 07:26 AM   #118
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Thanks for the update, and sorry about the accident! Certainly frustrating to have to stop because of an injury!
Glad the 19" was a good solution in the end!
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Old 2019-05-20, 01:23 PM   #119
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Originally Posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post

My worst unicycle injury was a broken big toe.
I can one up that. 2 big broken toes, one on each foot, but not at the same time. I've found that except in the first week, If you shift your foot forward a bit, you can still do just about everything you can do without a broken toe.

Last edited by mrfixit; 2019-05-20 at 01:45 PM.
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Old 2019-05-21, 05:05 AM   #120
elpuebloUNIdo
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Originally Posted by lowerstackmac View Post
Do you pull up continuously, or only as you come to ruts, irregularities, stones etc.?
I sit on the raised back portion of the saddle and place both hands on the bar ends or grab handle. I can push or pull, but mostly, I'm putting weight down on the bar ends.

It took me a while to develop into this technique. At first, I stood on the pedals, took my weight off the seat and pulled up hard to run over obstacles. But that technique wasn't effective at keeping the unicycle from being kicked out from under me.

For discrete obstacles, an unweighting technique can be used. But, if you're riding on a continuous resistant or bumpy surface, you cannot continuously unweight.

The secret for me is stability. My technique relies on "four points" of contact (2 sit bones, 2 hands) almost 100% of the time.
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