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Old 2004-06-24, 01:43 PM   #151
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Side note: In no way a reflection on this young person, but I'm getting really tired of the adverb, wheely.

Lyndsey's latest balancing act

131 words
24 June 2004
Newsquest Media Group Newspapers
English
© Copyright 2004 Newsquest Digital Media.

Stratford_upon_avon

STRATFORD schoolgirl Lyndsey Coldicott has come up with a wheely great idea to raise money for charity.

Lyndsey, aged 11, from Sackville Close, will be riding on a unicycle collecting money for the charity Action Unlimited at a garden party in Billesley next month.

The soon-to-be Stratford High School pupil is something of a serial fundraiser. Last year she walked along the canal towpaths from Birmingham to Stratford with her friend, Amanda Keal, to raise money for the Welcombe Hills School.

And all her good work for charitable causes was recognised earlier this year when she received a Young Hero award in the Pride of Coventry and Warwickshire Community Awards.

To make a donation, contact Heather Coldicott on 01789 292290.
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Old 2004-06-24, 03:59 PM   #152
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Side note: In no way a reflection on this young person, but I'm getting really tired of the adverb, wheely.
Yes, but can you do one?
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Old 2004-06-25, 02:08 PM   #153
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Unicyclist wins Bicycle!

Jack rides off with bike prize.

136 words
24 June 2004
Coventry Evening Telegraph
7
English
(c) 2004 Coventry Newspapers Ltd

A NUNEATON boy has become the lucky winner of a Raleigh Chopper bike in a county competition.

Jack Challinor won the prize after visiting Warwickshire County Council's "Pedalling for Nuneaton" event in the Market Place earlier this month.

The nine-year-old had correctly answered six questions about the displays on show in the town centre.

Jack, who raised more than £450 by unicycling from Nuneaton to Bedworth with the former Mayor of Nuneaton Cllr Ian Lloyd, had his entry pulled out from more than 70 hopefuls.

Nicola Robinson, the TravelWise officer at Warwickshire County Council, said: "It seems his efforts for all his fundraising have been rewarded!"

Hanif Sheikh also won a bag of goodies for cycling the furthest in two minutes - 1.26km - on a static bike.
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Old 2004-06-26, 08:58 PM   #154
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Not strictly about unicycles, but scroll down to the bolded section and read a few paragraphs on.


The art of the wheel ; Different spokes for different folks is the theme of the Louisiana Bicycle Festival in Abita Springs, where vintage Schwinns mingle with Mardi Gras-beaded bikes and chrome-laden low-riders.

Chris Bynum Staff writer
1,690 words
26 June 2004
Times-Picayune
01
English
Copyright (c) 2004 Bell & Howell Information and Learning Company. All rights reserved.

Some days he's a Mardi Gras Indian chief. Other days he's just a guy who loves bikes. On Father's Day last Sunday, Wade Batiste was the latter, wearing a bandanna in lieu of his feather headdress, as he polished his freshly painted pearl-green bicycle in an open Abita Springs field while other bike fans gathered.

Batiste, you see, isn't alone in his passion for the two-wheeled roadster that marks a rite of passage few children outgrow once they become adults.

"It's a connection between generations," says Ernie Dopp, a local collector of bikes and one of the forces behind the blossoming Louisiana Bicycle Festival, held annually on Father's Day.

As the day unfolded, each passing hour marked a significant rise in temperature as the summer sun glistened off chrome, glitter, Mardi Gras beads and anything else that might make a bike stand out in a crowd.

But don't look for Lance Armstrong types at this fest. The event calls to those who put personality over performance when it comes to one, two or three sets of wheels. As bike fans from Texas, Alabama and other nearby states gathered for the fourth annual event, their common bond was clear. These folks like bikes.

"It's all about self-expression," says Dopp, the originator, with John Preble, of the event. It was a build-it-and-they-will-come concept, you might say -- except that basically, the festival requires little preparation. Registration and fees are not required. Participants bring their own stools, canopies and picnics, although there is a small concession stand on the grounds.

Dopp brings a sampling of his personal collection of more than 75 vintage and custom-made bikes.

As Dopp puts it, bikes "are one of the few antiques you can ride." It was on one of his trips back from the Tammany Trace biking and walking trail in Abita Springs that he ran into Preble, who was in the midst of creating his eccentric UCM Museum in an old gas station at the trail head.

Dopp told Preble he could display a couple of his vintage bikes at the museum, and during their conversation, the idea for the Louisiana Bicycle Festival unfolded. Such gatherings had drawn crowds in other parts of the South (such as Houston and Atlanta), and both men were convinced that the Abita Springs site offered the potential for a growing event. And it did, Dopp says, expanding from about 100 people four years ago to more than 450 participants this year.

"We feel comfortable now saying that it is the largest bike festival in the South," says Preble.

"I have young guys talk to me, and their eyes get big because I know what they're talking about with road bikes and mountain bikes and Italian parts," Dopp said. "It's a good thing."

A festival of this sort, he says, allows everyone "to have his own style." Whether it's the guy with the 1961 Rollfast or the rider with the contemporary silver-studded motorcycle-inspired custom bike, the common denominator is an appreciation for the sentimental value of an old bike, the novelty of a hand-built bike, the creativity of an art bike and the individuality of a one-of-a-kind bike.

"I'd rather have a bike than a car," says Troy Warmington, 38, of Marrero. The bike he sports represents a trend in custom bikes: the chopper look with long lean lines and a low seat. The 26-inch stretch-frame bike has a quilted diamond-pattern seat in orange leather, the shiny chrome wheels have 144 spokes, and the low-to- the-ground look is complete with fake exhaust pipes.

Warmington, who has been designing bikes for six years, runs his hands over the 44-inch-high sissy bar. "Exercise?" he repeats the gist of the question. "This bike isn't about exercise. It's about joy."

It's the same for Shane Delacerda, 16, whose bike comes equipped with many of man's best accessories: a sound system run by a car battery on the back wheels and a television positioned in front of the handlebars. He and his grandfather, Gene Delacerda, built the custom bike, complete with running lights, in their Kenner garage in a matter of days.

"There are different things out there besides trouble," says the senior Delacerda, who thinks that bike projects not only close the gap between generations, but also teach children creativity and responsibility.

Wayne Spring of Albany is not discriminating when it comes to bikes. He will ride anything -- because he can -- from a contraption so small it appears to be a bike built for a circus Chihuahua to a 12-foot-high unicycle for the guy on stilts.

How Spring rotates a man-sized foot on a toy-sized pedal is amazing enough, but the towering unicycle is, as he puts it, "like the four-wheel drive of unicycles." It requires both strength and balance to operate because three wheels, one on top of the other, propel the vehicle forward. The first wheel turns the second wheel clockwise, which rotates the third wheel counter-clockwise.

There's a reason Spring collects such bikes. He is also known as Rocky the Clown, performing for private parties now and then. One of his unicycles uses the rubber soles of eight pairs of Converse sneakers for tire tread. Spring can't help but say "feet don't fail me now" when he begins to pedal.

But probably the most amazing bike in his collection is an old unicycle he found in a barn. The rusted contraption called to him. He knew it was a vintage piece from Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus, but he didn't have the money, so he offered the farmer $200 and his watch as collateral.

"It wasn't an expensive watch, but when I told the fellow it was sentimental because my mother had given it to me, he knew I would be good for the money," says Spring. What Spring later learned was just how far unicycles have come.

The original rectangular seat was far from ergonomic.

"That old seat creates a rash," says Spring, who has a new respect for the generation of performers who went before him.

Cody McLain, 12, thinks of bikes as showpieces, too. His parents had an art car, one of those cars that becomes a collage of found pieces and individual expression, coming together with some powerful glue and some free thinking.

McLain's art bike sported everything from a Noah's ark procession of plastic animals moving up the front fender over a trail of sequins and Mardi Gras beads to Ronald McDonald figurines and a yellow rubber "devil" duckie, complete with red horns.

How does it ride?

"Not sure," he says. But then again, form doesn't always have to follow function.

Otherwise, it would seem rather odd for an Electrolux vacuum cleaner carrier to sit on the back of a JC Higgins Sears bike, or for a bike to be equipped with leather-fringed saddle bags, accessorized with tucked velvet upholstery seats, accented with glass doorknobs on the handlebars or outfitted with a bowling trophy fender ornament -- all the brainchild of English Craig Jones, a tattoo artist from Kenner, whose riding entourage arrives outfitted as "riding cowboys."

In some strange way, this bike gathering is like the Westminster Dog Show, with one obvious exception. While prizes are given out, there are no winners or losers because there are no perimeters when it comes to these bikes. Each bike is appreciated for its lines, its color, its silhouette and its history.

And sometimes for its symbolism, from the nostalgia evoked by a 1935 Schwinn or a 1950s Western Flyer to the patriotic statement of a brand spanking new custom bike with chrome flame pedals, a Dalmatian kickstand and a silver-eagle fender ornament honoring the 343 firemen killed in the line of duty on Sept. 11, 2001.

That was one of the newest bikes in Dopp's collection, along with a bike styled after the Abita Springs Police Department cars.

But there were reminders that this wasn't just a festival for locals. John Youens had hauled his TexMex creation all the way from Magnolia, Texas, the family cat (named Guadeloupe) accompanying him and his wife.

Youens sat on the grass polishing the custom green paint job on the low-rider.

"It's Volkswagen CyberGreen with a Lamborghini gold overcoat. I wanted it to have more sparkle that the original Beetle color," says Youens, whose creation was conceived with the help of computer- aided graphics and his knack for bending tubing to fit the aerodynamic design.

About the time Youens finished polishing the frame, fest-goers began to line up for the bike parade through town, women dressed in pink to match pink bikes and men with hand-tooled cowboy boots to match fringed saddlebags on bike fenders. It was a short ride; the town has only so many city blocks winding around cafes, church steeples and the sheriff's office.

But they all return to the same place: a love for bikes.
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Old 2004-06-26, 09:02 PM   #155
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I think Cory Farley needs bit of an attitude adjustment.

Cory Farley - Opinion

Cory Farley
Staff
489 words
25 June 2004
Reno Gazette-Journal
1
English
(c) Copyright 2004, Reno Gazette-Journal. All Rights Reserved.

Could you pick a worse ride?

This Space never meant to become the Reno Gazette-Journal's Weird-Vehicle-Across-The-Country Reporter. Yet whenever anybody comes through town bound for Boston in a birchbark canoe, I wind up with the story.

Take Patrick Thomas, who stopped this week en route from San Francisco to New York. Thomas is traveling not on two wings, nor on four wheels, nor two.

He's on a unicycle. One wheel, and it's even less suited to the task than you're thinking:

o There are no brakes.

o There are no gears. One turn of the pedals equals one revolution of the wheel.

o There's no coasting. The foot bone's connected to the pedal bone, the pedal bone's connected to the wheel. If the unicycle is moving, so are Thomas' feet.

o The only luggage space is a backpack. Where would you attach a rack? He set out with four changes of clothing, but has mailed three home to save weight.

o Whatever water Thomas needs for the desert has to go in the backpack, too.

o It's slooooow. A reasonably fit bicyclist might average 15 miles per hour. Thomas can maintain "eight or nine" on a short ride, but on longer trips he shoots for six.

"It's just something I've always wanted to do," the San Francisco elementary school teacher said. "A unicycle is my main mode of transportation around the city."

You can't have an adventure without a cause these days, and Thomas has two: America's Second Harvest, a Chicago-based organization that feeds the needy, and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, in honor of his mother, who has survived two bouts with cancer and "is on her third life."

He isn't accepting donations personally. He intends to make it on his own, about 3,000 miles in 65 days. His Web site describes how to contribute to the two organizations.

It also explains his route and tracks his progress, which so far has been disappointing to him, though impressive to the unicycle-challenged. As of Monday, he was four days, about 175 miles, behind. But he said he has no doubt he'll finish.

From Reno, Thomas was scheduled to head for Fallon, then spend the next six or seven days crossing Nevada. Salt Lake City should come two days later; he'll continue through Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and Pennsylvania, reaching New York in late August.

Along the way, he'll hit up the media for stories. His goal is to average $1 in donations from everyone who hears about his trip, feed some hungry children and ease the lives of some people with cancer. Learn more at pedalthewaves.org.

Cory Farley can be reached at (775) 788-6340 or cfarley@rgj.com.
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Old 2004-06-30, 12:48 PM   #156
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Quote:
Originally posted by JJuggle
Side note: In no way a reflection on this young person, but I'm getting really tired of the adverb, wheely.

Lyndsey's latest balancing act

131 words
24 June 2004
Newsquest Media Group Newspapers
English
© Copyright 2004 Newsquest Digital Media.

Stratford_upon_avon

STRATFORD schoolgirl Lyndsey Coldicott has come up with a wheely great idea to raise money for charity.

Lyndsey, aged 11, from Sackville Close, will be riding on a unicycle collecting money for the charity Action Unlimited at a garden party in Billesley next month.

The soon-to-be Stratford High School pupil is something of a serial fundraiser. Last year she walked along the canal towpaths from Birmingham to Stratford with her friend, Amanda Keal, to raise money for the Welcombe Hills School.

And all her good work for charitable causes was recognised earlier this year when she received a Young Hero award in the Pride of Coventry and Warwickshire Community Awards.

To make a donation, contact Heather Coldicott on 01789 292290.
More Lyndsey.

Lyndsey's feat adds dad's fiver to her balance!

221 words
29 June 2004
Coventry Evening Telegraph
10
English
(c) 2004 Coventry Newspapers Ltd

SCHOOLGIRL Lyndsey Coldicott is not a girl to duck a challenge.

So when her dad Allan bet her £5 that she couldn't learn to ride a unicycle in two weeks, Lyndsey just had to prove him wrong - and go one better by even mastering a bit of juggling and swinging a bucket while wobbling along on the bike!

"I can also climb hills", said 11-year-old Lyndsey, who over the past few years has raised £3,000 for a range of good causes, earning her the title of Young Hero in the Evening Telegraph's Pride of Coventry and Warwickshire Community Awards.

She immediately gave her £250 prize cheque to the Jennifer Trust which helps children and adults suffering from spinal muscular atrophy.

On Sunday Lyndsey's collecting bucket will be wielded at a garden party at Billesley, near Stratford, in aid of charity.

She spent last weekend perfecting her unicycling technique at Abbey Fields, in Kenilworth.

Mum Heather said: "Her dad has already given Lyndsey the fiver he owes for learning to ride the unicycle so quickly - she just loves a challenge.

"And we already have about £100 from friends and relatives who want to support next Sunday's exertions."
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Old 2004-07-01, 12:56 PM   #157
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This USA Today article suggests that ESPN will be covering "mountain unicycling" in Japan as part of its coverage of less usual sports during the Olympics. See penultimate paragraph.

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Old 2004-07-06, 04:12 PM   #158
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A mere mention and an imcomplete one at that.

LIFESTYLE - CRAZES Bizarre sports

By SAMELA HARRIS
877 words
3 July 2004
The Advertiser
1 - State
S02
English
Copyright 2004 News Ltd. All Rights Reserved

In an age of extreme sports, crazy is never crazy enough. Every day, outlandish new activities spring up, catering for all ages and abilities.

Extreme croquet is the biggest thing. Probably because it is such fun. Extreme croquet clubs are cropping up all over the world and popping up in parks, on beaches, even on city streets. They play on all surfaces, including snow and flood. The more difficult, the more fun. As developed by the Connecticut Extreme Croquet Society, there are a lot of rules - a lot. They are growing and changing all the time. A few drinks are not compulsory, but are recommended.

http://www.extremecroquet.org/

The Brits, or at least the Welsh, are into bog snorkelling. Charming sport though a tad muddy in the shallow drains along the fields. The boys seem to like it, even though they emerge, draped in weeds and other unmentionables, and looking like creatures from the bog lagoon. http://llanwrtyd-wells.powys.org.uk/bog.html

Underwater rugby is as serious a sport and as passionately followed as land rugby - by those who indulge in it. A really breath-taking sport, and in the most literal way. Underwater tackles and goals. http://home.comcast.net/~jtheriault/Photos.htm

Bare-handed rock-climbing. They call themselves "boulderers" and they tackle some very extreme landscape. This mob does not consider itself eccentric. It is a world-respected activity. But some of us still think they are mad. http://www.australianbouldering.com/

Extreme ironing has become perhaps the most famous of all the extreme sports. The urban vacuum cleaner racers may have achieved video presence on their website, but they are just not in the popularity race with the ironers. These ironers go to the farthest reaches of the world - mountain peaks, islands, caves, skydiving, even surfboards. Just as well they don't seem to depend on electricity, for that would really press the limits, so to speak. Extreme ironing is now so popular it is the stuff of coffee table books - and daredevils trying to think of yet more far-out locations. As they say: "Extreme ironing is the latest danger sport that combines the thrills of an extreme outdoor activity with the satisfaction of a well pressed shirt." http://www.extremeironing.com/ Aussies are into the extreme ironing thing, too - most particularly out on Yorke Peninsula where it's a matter of "have ute, will iron". Those blokes can iron anywhere. http://mousepotato03.tripod.com/extr...g/madness.html

Wheelbarrow freestyling sounds lyrical but is dangerous. The sport is only three years old, emerging from a Welsh building site and zooming off to an urban games competition in London where it turned out to be a real crowd-pleaser. http://www.wheelbarrowfreestyle.com/main.html

Urban housework is highly extreme. Apocalypse dishwashing alone is not for the frail or fearful. It is a team sport for the very fit and dexterous, since it must be done running at high speed with a bucket of soapy water behind a person who is running and also eating something from a plate at the same time. The eater passes the plate to the washer who washes and passes it back to the dryer who dries the utensil and then, for no known reason, destroys it - thus making superfluous the whole process of washing it. But I guess that's where the apocalypse comes in.

Suburban mop jousting, on the other hand, is deemed to be the sport of gentlemen. Fairly rough gentlemen. It is an outdoor sport and they say that frying pans make the best shields, considering the weapons. http://www.urbanhousework.com/

The racing barstool. No kidding. It's a sport. You can have really powerful bar stools, too. Da Bomb is a motorising barstool with big boom exhaust. But if you'd rather race offroad, you can take up skating. All-terrain offroad skates are the new toy - well, there are many on the Extremetoysforboys website: http://extremetoysforboys.com/index.php3/welcome.html

Swinging sounds a bit ordinary. We all loved to do it as kids. But the Estonians have taken it to a new extreme and re-named it Kiiking. They make huge swings, 6m to 7m high, and the swingers have to achieve the full 360 deg loop. It's taking on in other countries now, with 7.01m being the current world record.

http://www.kiiking.ee/

Mud racing is big in the English region of Maldon. Hundreds of people do it every year. It looks, well, muddy. http://www.maldonlions.co.uk/mudrace/

The extreme unicyclists come from Germany. They lug their unicycles to the rugged rocky tops of vertiginous mountains where, naturally enough, they can't ride them anyway. http://www.extremeunicycling.de/

Don't throw away that old lawnmower. It has sports potential. You could soup it up and race it. Lawnmower racing is a big thing in the US. Truly. Just have a look - time-keepers, flags, tracks, chicanes and all. http://www.letsmow.com/

And the Brits are at it, too - getting out and dirty on the lawnmower racetrack and not a blade of grass to be seen: http://www.racemower.co.uk/
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Old 2004-07-06, 04:18 PM   #159
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One on One: Unicyclists Put Extreme Spin on Their Sport - Sacrmento Bee, July 6, 2004
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Old 2004-07-06, 04:24 PM   #160
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This USA Today article suggests that ESPN will be covering "mountain unicycling" in Japan as part of its coverage of less usual sports during the Olympics. See penultimate paragraph.
Yes, this is for real. As always with TV coverage, you can't be sure it's going to happen until they set definite meeting times, but they have been in contact with me about the event. A producer contacted me the other day and asked me to explain about "the race." as I would to a six-year-old. I told him Unicon is not a race, but the frigging Olympics of unicycling! Not in those exact words... Waiting now to see if we'll hear more. If not, someone still may show up there.

Meanwhile, the Sacramento Bee just came out with the article you featured above. Jess Riegel (Jester 2000) and Zack Baldwin (Zack) are the features, as they practice on the North Shore course they built in Jess' yard. Interview quotes also from me and John Hooten.

http://tinyurl.com/2hufv
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Old 2004-07-06, 04:53 PM   #161
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hey JJuggle, do your fingers hurt?
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Old 2004-07-07, 11:24 AM   #162
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Unhappy OK, so it's not unicycling...

FEATURE: (OBITUARY) FRANCIS BRUNN Juggler with a mesmeric act that grew in simplicity as he grew in craft until it revolved around a single, gravity-defying ball Created: 06/07/2004 7:02 GMT FRANCIS BRUNN was one of the greatest jugglers of his day. Whereas many jugglers are judged by the number of balls they can keep in the air, and how long for, Brunn was acclaimed for the apparent simplicity of his act, which increasingly focused on an individual ball, which he would transfer from his toe upwards in apparent defiance of the forces of gravity until it came to rest on the highest part of his body. Using a headpiece and mouthpiece supplied with ball bearings by a cousin who worked for Mercedes-Benz in Germany, he would then balance the well-travelled ball high above his head as he tossed one hoop while spinning another on his leg. An innovator who experimented constantly with new tricks, he claimed that "with fewer objects there are more possible variations". He was glad of an audience that did not applaud every trick, but showed their appreciation by remaining silent until the end of a performance. Spectators could rarely control their enthusiasm that long, however. Born in 1922 in the town of Aschaffenburg, near Frankfurt, Francis Brunn mostly taught himself his trade, though the initial impetus to juggle came from his father. Brunn Sr had spent a spell in a French prisoner of war camp during the First World War, and through the barbed wire had watched a circus juggler warming up. Grabbing what was nearest to hand - three stones - he imitated what he had seen, and on his release taught his children how to juggle three oranges. Brunn's skills were honed at the Performing Arts School in Berlin, where he also studied wrestling and acrobatics. Yet despite his passion for juggling, he declared in an interview at the tender age of 19 that he thought he would give it all up by the age of 25. Instead he went on juggling for more than 50 years. In the 1940s, assisted by his sister Lottie, a proficient juggler in her own right, Brunn toured an act around Europe, conventional in its format, slick with tricks and tumbling, to the accompaniment of music by Chopin. His dexterity earned comparisons with the maestro Enrico Rastelli, the first person to bounce-juggle balls, whose films Brunn had studied for inspiration. Brunn played down suggestions that he was Rastelli's natural successor, though: juggling was primarily a matter of fascination for him rather than a vocation. Funded indirectly by the takings of the three restaurants his father owned, Brunn could afford to juggle for fun. He shunned competitions and never borrowed another juggler's tricks, regarding juggling almost as a sacrosanct art form. Over the years, he simplified his stage persona, appearing in the costume of a Spanish dancer, moving around the stage with balletic grace, accompanied by his son Raphael on acoustic guitar and aided by his partner, Nathalie Enterline. The juggling balls he used were made especially for him by a Mr Bowman in Lebanon, Pennsylvania, who contacted NBC after a performance by Brunn on the Johnny Carson show during which the juggler lamented how hard it was to find good rubber balance balls. After several years as a satisfied customer, Brunn noticed a slight difference in the feel of the balls and asked Bowman why. Amazed at the sensitivity of Brunn's touch, Bowman admitted that a new employee had been hired who was cutting the rubber in a minutely different way. Brunn's rarefied skills could not thrive beyond the glory days of the cabaret hall and variety theatre, however, and Brunn was realistic about the future of juggling. Whereas once it had been a form of mainstream entertainment, the popularity of television and the demise of the traditional three-ring circus meant that it was increasingly marginalised. Certainly, in Greenwich Village, where he spent the last years of his life, there was little call for jugglers. Like any performer, he suffered his share of accidents. Perhaps the biggest disappointment occurred in 1948 when John Ringling, of Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus, brought Brunn to America as the star attraction of the new show. As the juggler stepped out into the centre ring at Madison Square Garden to open the show, his foot fell into a gap where the stagehands had failed to fit the boards together properly. He twisted his foot badly and spent several months recuperating before finally opening with Ringling in Boston. A hip injury from 1970 troubled him for the rest of his career, and his fingers were as bruised and battered as those of the boxers he loved to watch in the ring. Over the years Brunn appeared on various American television shows, before royalty and politicians. His partner Nathalie Enterline survives him, along with a son and daughter. Francis Brunn, juggler, was born on November 15, 1922. He died on May 28, 2004, aged 81.x COPYRIGHT - THE TIMES, LONDON



"Francis Brunn, juggler, was born on..."

now THAT's an epitaph
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Old 2004-07-08, 07:31 PM   #163
johnfoss
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Francis Brunn was awesome. I saw him the first time I went to the Big Apple Circus, in 1983. He was worth the entier ticket price.

Okay, way more than the ticket price. That show was only $10.00! Times have changed.

I took a picture of him at the end of his act where he looked straight into my lens. Somehow this picture ended up in the current issue of JUGGLE Magazine, which has an aritlce about his life. I'll have to ask author Alan Howard how he ended up with that picture...
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Old 2004-07-09, 02:50 PM   #164
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If, as I've heard it said, "rugby players eat their dead", what do unicycle rugby players do with them?

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=============================================
YOUNGSTERS PUT THEIR CIRCUS SKILLS TO THE TEST

208 words
9 July 2004
The Northern Echo
06
English
(c) 2004 North of England Newspapers.

FIRE juggling and rugby on unicycles are not activities usually associated with schools, but one group of North Yorkshire youngsters are preparing to put on a show combining all manner of circus skills.

Thirty pupils at Richmond School are taking part in a circus performance next week.

Gymnasts and members of the school's circus club have been rehearsing every week since the start of the year.

Among the performances will be a display of unicycle riding, including unicycle rugby and hockey, as well as knife, fire and diabolo juggling.

Maths teacher Andrew Mollitt, who is also the circus club leader, said:

"We have been working on it all year so it will be the culmination of a lot of hard work.

"We have done little performances before in assemblies and village fetes, but this is the first time we have tried to put on a big circus show.

"We went to watch the circus in York early in the school year and we fancied trying it ourselves."

Performances take place at the school on July 14, 15 and 16.

Tickets cost £3.50 for adults and £2 for children and are available from the school or on the door.
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Old 2004-07-10, 12:39 PM   #165
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"Bike Magazine June 2004 v11 i3 p82(1)


Here's one for the MUNI Militia. Head to Spearfish Canyon in South Dakota on June 26-27 for the Black Hills Mountain Unicycle Weekend. Organizer David Maxfield is promising some "very technical singletrack downhill [with] 10- to 15-mile courses." Shuttles will be provided. World Wide Web it to www.blackhills.unicyclist.com, or contact Maxfield at maxfieldd@aol.com for all the answers to your one wheeled questions. Keep sending the dirt to: hurl@carsrcoffins.com."
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