Unicyclist Community

Go Back   Unicyclist Community > Unicycling Discussion > General Unicycling Discussions

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rating: Thread Rating: 447 votes, 4.98 average. Display Modes
Old 2003-08-11, 01:58 PM   #61
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
Quote:
Originally posted by GILD
or accurate!!!
I was actually referring to the very last sentence.

Raphael Lasar
Matawan, NJ
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2003-08-29, 12:45 PM   #62
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
Suicycle!

Performer fired up about juggling ** Wade Henry cashed in business career to tour world with his "suicycle.' ** Frass at the Fair

By Mike Frassinelli Of The Morning Call
629 words
27 August 2003
The Allentown Morning Call
FIRST
B1
English
Copyright 2003, Allentown Morning Call. All Rights Reserved.

MIKE FRASSINELLI, a reporter for The Morning Call, prepares to throw a series of flaming torches up to juggler Wade Henry, seated on a basketball hoop-high unicycle at the Allentown Fair.

Wade Henry -- yes, the Wade Henry way up there juggling burning torches while riding his 10-foot-tall unicycle -- planned for a sensible career.

He went to a sensible college in his native Canada.

He used his sensible business degree to land a sensible 9 to 5 office job in marketing.

So what was he doing wearing a floppy leather pilot hat and juggling fire while riding what he calls his "suicycle" in front of a crowd that assembled on the midway Tuesday night at the Allentown Fair?

He was continuing the career that turned out to make the most sense to him after all: the career of traveling around the world to make people laugh.

He left his office job nearly a decade ago to travel with a buddy, but returned to his college hobby of street performing when they ran out of cash in Australia.

Henry, 33, who now hails from Clearwater, Fla., is as good a street performer as you will see. Back by popular demand at the fair this year, he juggles chain saws, balls and the emotions of a crowd. He swallows fire and 4-foot-long balloons. He rides a unicycle that has a chair about the height of a professional basketball rim.

And, in his most amazing feat, the married father of one had enough trust to let me throw fire at him Tuesday night.

During the audience participation portion of the show, Henry called up Ron from Fogelsville ("Ron came all the way from Pennsylvania, wooooo"), me and a guy named Eric to help steady the unicycle while Henry climbed up it.

Henry sat first on my shoulders, acting surprised that he hadn't yet reached the top of the unicycle.

Following his advice, at the count of three we let go of the unicycle, turned in the other direction -- and ran like heck.

As Henry stabilized himself on the unicycle, he called out: "No steering. No brakes. No insurance."

He called me back again to help him with his torch juggling.

He wanted me to light three torches -- juggling pins with cloth wicks. He pulled a lighter out of his pocket and held it for me to grab -- but held it just above my reach, prompting me to jump like a child trying to retrieve a ball in a game of monkey in the middle.

A few more laughs were had at my expense when the lighter turned out to be a dud.

I finally got three torches lit. Now it was time to throw them one by one to Henry.

It was starting to get windy and I could feel the heat against my arm hair.

Henry emphasized: "Mike, one at a time Not like the last guy!"

Using the bent-elbow throwing motion Henry showed me earlier, at the count of three I gave him a nice chest-high toss that was easy -- for him -- to catch.

The other two throws were on target, too, although I could have sworn I smelled burning arm hair after the third toss.

Relieved that I didn't play Mrs. O'Leary's cow to the hay-filled barn that was the Allentown Fair midway, I thought my participation was over.

Henry spotted a cute child in the first row.

"Now, Mike," he said from way up on his unicycle. "Throw me the baby."
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2003-08-29, 12:47 PM   #63
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
Mean spirited!

Victor Lewis-Smith's column - Pointless Book Of Records.

By Victor Lewis-Smith.
555 words
23 August 2003
Mirror
6
English
(c) 2003 Mirror Group Ltd

THERE are people called physiognomists, who make a scientific study of the human face.

But I may well be the world's only gastro-physiognomist, specialising in celebrity boat races that are so unpleasant they turn my stomach.

There's Ruby Wax, who has a face like a bulldog licking p*** off a nettle, and who is so in my face when she's on TV that I feel like the nettle.

Then there's Antony Worrall Thompson, half-chipmunk and half-Munchkin (with the emphasis on munch, to judge from his expanding girth).

Nor should we forget Norris McWhirter, whose face bears the permanently pained expression of a man sucking a lemon, and who is so starchy that, if he stood alongside dead brother Ross, he'd still be the straight man.

McWhirter's name will always be synonymous with the Guinness Book Of Records, that literary lemon he edited for some 40 years.

I've long regarded it as a stomach-turning exercise of mind-numbing futility, whose sole purpose is to give ill-deserved media attention to overgrown schoolboys, whose sole accomplishment in life involves sitting in a bath of custard or unicycling around the Isle Of Man.

So the 14 members of the Kabosh Theatre who crammed themselves into an Edinburgh telephone box this week must have been astonished when a spokeswoman for the Guinness Book said that, "We no longer recognise records for people in phone boxes", on the grounds that it is not a sufficiently serious enterprise.

Really? Well, if the editors start regarding seriousness of purpose as a criterion for entry, their next edition is going to be the thinnest volume since The Pop-Up Book Of Saddam's WMDs.

But what a pity they didn't announce that policy back in the early 60s, because I wouldn't then have had to endure a childhood blighted by attention-seeking idiots pushing peas with their noses from London to Norwich in a bid to get an entry.

Nor would we have to put up with tedious stuntmen like David Blaine, who is proposing to spend 44 days locked in a glass case suspended over the River Thames, and expects us to watch him just because it'll be a world record.

Even worse than the Guinness Book was its televisual spin-off, Record Breakers, on which people were actively encouraged to perform such pointless feats.

Indeed, I once saw the McWhirter brothers cramming 70 children into a Mini, in exactly the sort of imbecilic exploit that the publishers of the book now claim to eschew. At this point, I should confess that in my younger days I wrote numerous letters to Mr McWhirter in a bid to be included in his book.

But my attempts were always satirical, such as the time I asked to be included as "the first journalist to libel himself in print, then sue his newspaper for damages" after I'd used my column to call myself, "A fat, ugly, untalented hack with hair like a slashed sofa, diarrhoea of the mouth and constipation of the ideas".

Come to think of it, I've just done the same thing again, so the Mirror's lawyers can expect a writ on Monday.
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2003-08-29, 12:53 PM   #64
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
Profile of Unicycle.com

Don't see that anyone posted this article on Unicycle.com and John Drummond.

It's from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Raphael Lasar
Matawan, NJ
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2003-09-08, 03:25 PM   #65
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
More thieving bastages...

Thief steals clowns unicycle

300 words
5 September 2003
Newsquest Media Group Newspapers
English
© Copyright 2003 Newsquest Digital Media.

Bolton

ENTERTAINER Trumble is really down in the dumps . . . because his beloved unicycle has been stolen.

The popular performer, who has been making children laugh for the last 20 years, found that the bike had been taken after a show in Horwich last month.

Since his one-wheeled transport was stolen the Leigh-based clown's act has had to be a little more pedestrian than usual -- and he is appealing for its return.

He was hosting a children's circus skills workshop on August 15 when the chrome unicycle, worth several hundred pounds, was stolen from the fairground in Station Park.

Trumble, whose real name is Arnold Cheetham, went to load some of his kit after the show but when he returned to collect his unicycle he found that someone had ridden it away.

He said: "The bike is regularly used for entertaining and teaching circus skills to children, some with special needs.

"It will be quite difficult and expensive for me to replace it if it comes to that. It's being sorely missed by the kids because it's one of the main parts of my act when we do the workshops so I'm very keen to get it back.

"It's not something that would be much use to most people. I hope the people of Horwich will be able to help me find out where it is. I'm still hopeful that I'll be reunited with it.

"There were still a lot of people around when it was taken so somebody must have seen something."

Trumble, aged 50, is offering a cash reward for the return of the bike.

Anyone with information is asked to call Trumble on 07970 073821 or Greater Manchester Police on 0161 856 5757.
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2003-09-08, 03:29 PM   #66
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
NT's wonders on one wheel

By ANTHONY BARICH
361 words
2 September 2003
Sunday Territorian
1 -
40
English
(c) 2003

Four NT youths and their coach are off to become the slowest riders in Australia and win the national titles in Canberra in the process.

Unicycling Brothers Bjorn (BJ), 16, and Seamus Christie-Johnstone, 14, Michael Cavanagh, 11, and Phoebe Martin, 10, will compete against riders from Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong and the Philippines from October 4-6.

The riders, coached by Debbie Hyder, will be the first Territorians to contest the UniNats after they were first held in ACT in 2001.

"Anyone can learn to ride a unicycle -- it just takes a lot of practice and self-motivation," Hyder said.

"They will also be tested for their International Unicycling Federation (IUF) levels, which are currently unavailable in the NT."

Hyder will also be contesting UniNats.

She is seeking endorsement as an IUF examiner, enabling Territory unicyclists to progress outside of competition.

Continued: Page 37

Junior sport: Page 34-35

One-wheel wonders

From Back Page

Competition at UniNats in Canberra involves track racing (fastest rider over 100m, 400m, 800m and relays), mountain unicycling, unicycle hockey and unicycle basketball, and novelty races like wheel walk (where the rider "walks" the wheel with their feet, rather than pedalling), backward racing, ride and juggle, obstacle course and slow race.

The winner in the slow race is the last rider to cross the finish line without falling off.

The riders will attend skills workshops, focusing on developing freestyle routines, trials and urban combat unicycling (negotiating obstacles like stairs, skateboard ramps, fences, park benches), and learning how to judge at unicycle events.

Michael specialises in shorter distances. Phoebe will compete in standard races of all distances.

As well as competing in the NT unicycle hockey team with her NT teammates, Phoebe hopes to join a unicycle basketball team. B.J. is becoming an accomplished muni rider (mountain unicyclist).

Debbie Hyder and Unicycling Association of the NT (UniANT) president Karen Martin-Stone aim to secure the 2005 UniNats for Darwin.

"We have all the top class facilities required for a competition of this calibre," Martin-Stone said.

The competitors need sponsorship to attend the nationals.
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2003-10-07, 05:14 PM   #67
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
On one wheel for sick kids

Fiona Byrne
191 words
5 October 2003
Sunday Herald Sun
1 - FIRST
111
English
(c) 2003 Herald and Weekly Times Limited

SAMUEL Johnson will fulfil a 12-year-old pledge when he rides a unicycle from Sydney to Melbourne later this month.

Johnson, the sometimes controversial star of The Secret Life of Us, tells the November issue of B. magazine, on sale tomorrow, he will make the unusual journey to raise funds for CanTeen, a support organisation for young people affected by cancer.

Johnson was 11 when his older sister, Constance, a disability support worker, was diagnosed with bone cancer.

She has made a full recovery, but the years she spent having treatment and battling the disease had a profound effect on Johnson.

"When I was 14, I told CanTeen I'd ride a unicycle from Sorrento to Melbourne -- that's about 60km," Johnson (pictured above with his sister in B) tells the magazine.

"I've modified the idea over the years. I thought if I unicycle from Sydney to Melbourne, people would be interested in the story."

Johnson will leave Sydney on October 24 and plans to arrive in Melbourne at Federation Square on November 25.

==============================================

Raphael Lasar
Matawan, NJ
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2003-10-07, 05:15 PM   #68
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
Troopers crack down on Fairbanks rollerskiers

659 words
4 October 2003
19:16
Associated Press Newswires
English
(c) 2003. The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

FAIRBANKS (AP) - Alaska State Troopers are cracking down on rollerskiing, a popular recreational activity in Fairbanks.

The enforcement began last weekend when troopers issued a ticket to a rollerskier for obstructing traffic. The very next day, troopers ordered the University of Alaska Fairbanks cross-country ski team to halt its workout.

"People are rollerskiing on roads all over the country and I've never heard of anything like this," said UAF ski coach Bill McDonnell, who came to Fairbanks from Vermont five years ago. "It's kind of disconcerting, especially when Fairbanks is such a skiing community."

It marked the first time anyone can remember a rollerskier getting a ticket.

"In the 19 years I've been rollerskiing in Fairbanks I've been passed numerous times by troopers or Fairbanks police and not once have I been stopped," said Ken Leary, a 45-year-old elementary school teacher who troopers ticketed on Saturday.

Troopers allege that Leary, who was rollerskiing along Chena Ridge Road with another man, swung his ski pole at a passing car. That car was being driven by Capt. Greg Tanner, detachment commander for Alaska State Troopers in Fairbanks, who was off duty at the time.

While Tanner claims he identified himself as a trooper and asked the two skiers to stop, the two skiers say they didn't hear Tanner do that and figured he was an angry motorist yelling at them.

After the confrontation, Tanner followed the two skiers for more than 20 minutes until an on-duty trooper, whom Tanner had called, showed up on Cripple Creek Road to issue Leary a ticket.

On Sunday, three troopers ordered 11 members of the Nanooks ski team to remove their rollerskis during a workout on Cripple Creek Road. Troopers said they had received complaints from local residents. Seven of the skiers were given rides back to a school van and four others were told to walk back to the vehicle.

Cripple Creek Road is about 5 miles south of Fairbanks and has become a hot spot for rollerskiers because it is freshly paved.

Troopers said Sunday's incident was prompted by calls from concerned residents in the area, not any kind of confrontation from the previous day.

"When somebody calls and says somebody is going to get killed, we respond to that," said trooper Gary Tellep, one of the three troopers who showed up Sunday.

Troopers are enforcing a law they said has been on the books for years but has been ignored.

The law is Alaska Administrative Code AAC 02.395 (e), which says, "No person may operate a unicycle, coaster, roller skates or a similar device on the roadway." A rollerski falls into the "similar device" category, Tanner said.

That's news to skiing folks like John Estle, the former UAF and U.S. Ski Team coach who has lived and coached in Fairbanks for three decades.

"This is a brand new interpretation (of the law)," Estle said. "People have been rollerskiing in Fairbanks for more than 20 years without a problem."

The problem, as Tanner saw it on Saturday, was a safety issue.

"I wouldn't have stopped at all on Saturday if I didn't think they were creating a hazard," the trooper said. "My action was based on the fact that I saw two men side-by-side in the travel portion of the roadway in a no-passing zone and there was a curve."

While troopers won't necessarily be on the lookout for rollerskiers, they will respond if they receive complaints or see rollerskiers in the road, Tanner said.

"We don't have a specific agenda to hunt out rollerskiers on the highway ... but if troopers come across that or if citizens call, we will follow up and take appropriate action," Tanner said.

Tanner had some advice for rollerskiers.

"I would suggest they use bike paths or get the statute changed."
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2003-10-07, 05:17 PM   #69
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
Going off road, on one wheel ; A mountain unicycling club

ABIGAIL LEICHMAN, STAFF WRITER
1,101 words
2 October 2003
The Record
All Editions.=.Two Star B. Two Star P. One Star B
U03
English
Copyright (c) 2003 Bell & Howell Information and Learning Company. All rights reserved.

Scott Bridgman's unicycle obsession began with a wheelchair.

A fellow mountain-biker who'd injured his ankle demonstrated a wheelchair wheelie to Bridgman and invited him to try. But he couldn't manage even one.

So disturbed was Bridgman at his lack of athletic prowess that, at age 44, he got himself a unicycle and determined to learn how to ride it. His girlfriend, Jennie Bruno, also went one-wheeled.

Now, the two Morristown residents are part of a group that regularly takes their unicycles off road in the off-beat sport of mountain unicycling -- MUni for short.

"It's kind of an unusual sport," Bridgman concedes. But he insists it's not extreme. Mountain unicyclists go only 1 or 2 mph and are suited up with safety in mind.

"MUni is the act of riding over rough or uneven terrain on a unicycle specially designed for the task," he explains on his Web site, muniac.com.

"The challenge is to maintain balance and control while moving through terrain that may include ... single track, sand, dirt, mud, streams, logs, log buildups, roots, rocks, bridges, drops, snow, ice, grass, uphills, and downhills."

Bruno says they bought their unicyles hoping that improved balance would come in handy in skiing season. "We spent all of the summer of 1999 trying to beat this skill into our heads," she recalls. "After a lot of bruises and scrapes, we figured it out."

And they were right about the balance factor: "For those out there that are looking for an off-season balance sport to keep you in shape, MUni is perfect," Bridgman contends.

But it was not easy to master. The trick was installing a bar along a 20-foot wall of their basement, which allowed them to slide along as they practiced. They also picked up tips in Jack Wiley's "The Unicycle Book."

Bridgman recalls that by July, a month after starting, they were ready to venture beyond the basement. "After a dozen attempts with an assisted start on smooth, level pavement, I managed to ride a very wobbly 50 feet before dumping off. That first ride gave me the confidence to know I could do it. Unicycling is so addictive once you get past that first ride."

By November of that year, the pair had learned about MUni on the Internet and wanted to try it. "We decided to get a Web site going, figuring that maybe somebody else might be crazy like us," Bridgman says. "Lo and behold, we started to get some interest. Now we have 12 people in the group."

The group, which rides about once a week unless the ground is too wet or snowy, includes two men from Manhattan, one from Caldwell, one from Cresskill, one from South Jersey, and two from Livingston.

Bruno remains the only female, and the ages range from early 20s to late 40s. But they all have one thing in common aside from their unicycles: Every one of them has a technical job.

"We seem to enjoy the challenges and technicalities of what's required to ride off road," says Bridgman. "You have to be able to do movements rapidly and correct your balance constantly on a surface area the size of a half dollar."

Bridgman is an electrical engineer who makes specialty design and fabrication work with plastics and metals, a skill he has parlayed into custom unicycle accessories he sells on his Web site.

Jeff Prosa, 24, of Cresskill, is a computer programmer. He says he once spotted a guy unicycling across the Queensboro Bridge and decided to buy one. "My friend and I became obsessed with it because it's so difficult to ride," he says. "Even just trying to sit on it is difficult because your legs have to adjust to the pedals."

It's also a tiring workout. "I've done a lot of bicycle riding, and I thought I was in pretty good shape," says Prosa. "But after one loop on the unicycle, I was burned out."

Now, he says, his bike is sitting in the garage with flat tire. "The unicycle is much more of a challenge, and I prefer riding in the woods."

Bridgman calls MUni a "grabber sport," and Bruno explains that riders are always curious to see what they can accomplish next.

"The thrill is getting the hang of that bend, or getting over that root that you couldn't do before," says the information systems analyst. "It's also a social thing. I would love to have another woman in our group."

****

(SIDEBAR, PAGE 003)

WHERE TO MUni

The North Jersey MUni Invitational II, scheduled for Friday through Saturday, will include riders from as far away as California, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania. Each day's ride will last four to six hours. Registration is required, writes Scott Bridgman on his Web site (muniac.com), "but it's painless both to the wallet and body."

Bridgman's site also includes a list of state parks where he has tried this sport, with commentary (muniac.com/trails.htm).

For instance, he writes that Ramapo Mountain State Forest has "six good one-way runs" while Norvin Green State Park has "difficult terrain with huge, slick rock formations."

Those who register with the site also get information on upcoming rides.

****

(SIDEBAR, PAGE 003)

MUni equipment

Expect to pay between $85 and $140 for a new 20-inch model. You can check out bike stores or unicycle.com. Used equipment and custom accessories are available on muniac.com.

Safety gear is a must, says Scott Bridgman. You'll need a good bike helmet, good knee and shin pads, arm and elbow pads, and a back pad to protect the tailbone. Padded cycling shorts and eye protection against flying twigs and dirt also are recommended.

The slow speed helps keep down injuries, and unicyclists usually land on their feet. But falls come with the territory.

"If you dump - I should say when you dump - you may have to tuck your arms into your body and roll," says Bridgman. "Arm protection allows you to roll out of a bad fall."

Bridgman's own worst "dump" to date resulted in a bloody knee rather than a shattered kneecap, thanks to his pads. "Generally, the idea is to confine injuries to bruises, bumps, and sprains."

Caption: ++++; PHOTO - A boulder is no obstacle for MUni enthusiast Scott Bridgman. "The challenge is to maintain balance and control," he says.
==============================================

Raphael Lasar
Matawan, NJ
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2003-10-07, 05:19 PM   #70
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
One-wheeled wonders; Group to present Unicycle Tour de Leola

Carole Deck, Correspondent
681 words
1 October 2003
Lancaster New Era/Intelligencer Journal/Sunday News
English
Copyright (c) 2003 Bell & Howell Information and Learning Company. All rights reserved.

It's the first time for young unicyclists to present the Unicycle Tour de Leola. But members of The C.L.U.B. (The County of Lancaster Unicycle Balancers) are sure it won't be the last one.

The free event will take place Oct. 19 at Leola Elementary School, 11 School Drive, Leola.

More than 90 unicyclists from four elementary schools, one middle and one high school are scheduled to take a 3-mile ride around Leola.

Twelve members of The C.L.U.B. from Conestoga Valley Middle School and high school are participating in the event. Trainers for the midle school and high school are David Ramos and Sam Gruss.

Other participants include Leola Elementary School -- Paul Hosler, trainer; John R. Bonfield Elementary School, Lititz -- Jerry McDonald, trainer; Paradise Elementary and Leacock Elementary -- Melissa Fritts, trainer; Doe Run Elementary -- Steve Fink, trainer; and Highland Elementary, Ephrata -- Cindi Hess, trainer.

"Our goal for the event is to have people recognize the growing sport of unicycling," said Marti Beiler, who helped organize the event sponsored by The C.L.U.B.

Registration starts at 2 p.m. at Leola Elementary School.

The tour route starts at Leola Elementary and travels through the Maple Development (Sunset Avenue, Rose Avenue, Maple Avenue, Aspen Drive, Magnolia Drive, Conestoga Avenue, Blaine Avenue) and ends back at the school.

Paul Hosler will be grand marshal and will lead the riders. Hosler, a Leola Elementary gym teacher, was instrumental in introducing unicycling to students in Conestoga Valley School District.

Beiler emphasized that the tour isn't a race, and riders will ride at their own pace. C.L.U.B. parents will bicycle along with the unicyclists to provide assistance if needed.

Their will be a free performance at 5 p.m. in the Leola Elementary School gym.

Hot dogs, chips, ice cream and beverages will be available from 3 to 5 p.m.

For Zach Wilson, 13, of Leola, riding a unicycle is more challenging than riding a bicycle.

"You can do some really neat tricks... like side mounts, free mounts and my favorite riding with one foot," Wilson said.

Most of the C.L.U.B. members began riding in fourth grade.

Marti Beiler's son, Jason, 15, leads the group routines and is a national gold medallist. His aspiration is to compete in the International unicycle competition held in Japan this summer.

The unicyclists ride on 20-inch and 24-inch wheels as they perform a variety of routines to demonstrate their skills. The students think doing the "Macarena" is more fun done on a unicycle.

Melissa Gates, 13, of Leola, believes balance and confidence are necessary to succeed in the sport.

"It takes persistence and practice.... You fall a lot while learning," Gates said.

"Ride through life... on one wheel" is The C.L.U.B. motto.

Krystle Chocker, 13, of Leola, is credited with the catchy motto that's featured on their T-shirts.

"I hope lots of people come to our performance. It's entertainment and sports combined," Chocker said.

For some students, learning to ride a unicycle made a difference in how they viewed sports.

Christina Tabraham, 14, admitted it was a sport she could do and really liked.

"I'm not into competitive sports. I unicycle because I enjoy it," Tabraham said.

According to Marti Beiler, C.L.U.B. members benefit from their trainers, Ramos and Gruss. Both are international and national multi- gold competitors.

Other C.L.U.B. members are Abbey Barton, Ian Anderson, Ryan Masser, Katie Jones, Jeremiah Martin, Jonathan Martin and Sarah Dommel.

For more information about the unicycle tour, call Marti Beiler at 656-9264. Rain date is Oct. 26.

PHOTOS; Caption: Carole Deck; (1)Members of The County of Lancaster Unicycle Balancers practice for an upcoming tour and performance. (2)Conestoga Valley Middle School students Zach Wilson, left, and Melissa Gates practice some moves on their unicycles. They are members of The County of Lancaster Unicycle Balancers.

==============================================

Raphael Lasar
Matawan, NJ
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2003-10-20, 03:15 PM   #71
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
Actor's secret passion

CLARE MASTERS
MATP
203 words
19 October 2003
Sunday Telegraph
1 - State
20
English
(c) 2003 Nationwide News Proprietary Ltd

TEN months ago, embarking on a unicycle odyssey between Sydney and Melbourne was just a drunken New Year's Eve resolution for rising young star Samuel Johnson.

Now that the notion has become a reality, he's getting nervous about the prospect.

"I'd had the idea earlier, but I decided somewhat hazily that I had to do it this year," he says.

The rubber-faced actor, known for his role as Evan Wylde in television's The Secret Life of Us, is serious about the cause he's riding for: -- cancer charity CanTeen.

"My sister had cancer when she was 12 and I was 11, and that led to a long-lasting relationship with CanTeen," he says.

"Finding out that my sister had cancer shocked me to my very core. It completely changed my life."

During the 1000km Seek LifeCycle for CanTeen, which he hopes will raise more than $600,000, Johnson will ride an average of 37km a day before crossing the finish line in Melbourne on November 25.

You can make a donation to CanTeen by visiting www.seek.com.au and clicking on CanTeen or by phoning 1300 789 769.
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2003-10-20, 03:22 PM   #72
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
Good times roll ; Young Collins unicyclers find fun, fitness, self-respect

DAVID WICKERT
The News Tribune
499 words
15 October 2003
The News Tribune
South Sound
B03
English
Copyright (c) 2003 Bell & Howell Information and Learning Company. All rights reserved.

Blair McFarland's office at Collins Elementary School is filled with footballs, basketballs, jump ropes and other accessories you'd expect to find in a gym teacher's possession.

And then there are the unicycles.

About 50 of them hang from McFarland's office ceiling - except for an hour each afternoon when students in the school's Coyote One- Wheelers Unicycle Club practice. At those times, the ceiling empties and the gym fills with grade-schoolers peddling the one-wheeled bikes in circles and figure eights.

It's a spectacle that has become increasingly popular among McFarland's students in the Summit-area school in the Franklin Pierce School District.

"They just come out of their shell," he said. "They've found something they can do and others can't."

Six years ago, McFarland got the idea for the club from the success colleagues at other schools had teaching various "circus arts" like juggling, tumbling and unicycling. McFarland decided to focus on unicycling.

He had to encourage many of the original 20 club members to participate. But when kids saw their friends cycling, he said, "it just snowballed."

Today, the club has 75 active riders and another 75 on a waiting list. Participants range in age from Collins first-graders to middle- schoolers who come back just for the cycling.

They are divided into two beginning groups, one intermediate group and an advanced group. McFarland also coaches a performing group that masters choreographed routines and rides at football and basketball games and parades.

Last Wednesday, about two dozen intermediate and advanced youngsters defied gravity at the Collins gym as McFarland put them through a series of increasingly complex maneuvers. They zigged left and right around cones, zagged around each other, practiced various mounts and rocked in place. Most rode standard unicycles, though a few mounted "giraffe" bikes that in some cases were taller than themselves.

McFarland said unicycling helps develop good balance, strength, body control and coordination. Several club members agreed.

"It makes me work hard at something," said 12-year-old Kaelin Kerr. "It's something to focus on."

"It's challenging," added 9-year-old Taylor Griffin.

But kids also have more kid-like reasons for enjoying unicycling.

"I think it's cool to show off to people," said 9-year-old Rachel Sandoral. "People stare at you."

"It's fun. It's interesting," said 11-year-old Justin Osborn. "Not many of my friends do that."
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2003-10-27, 03:11 PM   #73
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
I know Ramos and Lowell, two of our many Davids rode this event. And look, Nikkifrog got a quote! Way to go all.

The search at LancasterOnline does not currently retrieve this article, but may in the coming days. Who knows, there may be a picture.

==============================================
Unicyclists have a wheel good time on local tour

Madelyn Pennino
524 words
20 October 2003
Lancaster New Era/Intelligencer Journal/Sunday News
English
Copyright (c) 2003 Bell & Howell Information and Learning Company. All rights reserved.

Whizzing around the parking lot of Leola Elementary School on Sunday, unicyclists practiced their free mounts, jump mounts and zig- zags - skills required of any seasoned unicyclist.

About 80 unicyclists from several local school districts and their parents participated in a three-mile tour through Maple Development, a neighborhood within walking distance of the school.

The tour was organized through the County of Lancaster Unicycle Balancers, or CLUB. Marti Beiler, a member of CLUB and parent of a unicyclist, spearheaded the event. "I think people are shying away from unicycling as a sport," Beiler said. "There are a lot of people who know how to ride, but don't continue to develop their skills."

Not true for Beiler's son, Jason, who has captured the title of 2003 World Champion Gold Medalist in the obstacle course category. Jason, a freshman at Conestoga Valley High School, said riding a unicycle didn't come naturally in the beginning.

"I wasn't very good at first," Beiler said. "Not until I started feeling myself get used to the bike." Beiler, who will continue to compete nationally and internationally, rode a six-inch wheel unicycle on Sunday's tour.

Short or tall, big wheels or small wheels, there were as many different kinds of unicycles as there were unicylists.

Jenna Miller, 12, of Ephrata Middle School, started riding her unicycle a year ago as part of a unit in her elementary school gym class. Though she is relatively new to the sport, she said the tour didn't wear her out. "I wasn't tired afterward," Jenna said. "It was fun."

Three bicyclists rode alongside unicyclists to supervise the tour. Streets were open during the ride. However, East Lampeter Township police directed traffic at intersections.

Most of the students who participated in the tour were introduced to unicycle-riding during physical education class in elementary school. A large portion of those students are also part of CLUB, which was formed in January to raise interest in unicycling and for people to maintain interest in the sport.

Paul Hosler, a physical education teacher at Leola Elementary, said the tour will encourage students to share their skills. "It's a great opportunity for kids who know how to unicycle to learn from each other and be together, Hosler said.

One unicyclist is so committed to the sport she drove four hours from Coudersport to participate.

Nikki Morley, 15, said she learned about the event at the national unicyclist convention this past summer. "I'm the only unicyclist in my area," Nikki said. I have to travel to be with other unicyclists. But I'm thinking of starting a club at my school."

As for Warwick student Rachel Olena, she won't have any trouble sticking to riding her unicycle. "This (sport) is unusual," Rachel said, "Not many people know about riding a unicycle. That's why I like it."

After the ride, students ate hot dogs, chips and ice cream courtesy of local businesses. Unicycle performances by several school districts ended the day in Leola Elementary's gymnasium.
==============================================

Raphael Lasar
Matawan, NJ
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine

Last edited by JJuggle; 2003-10-27 at 03:13 PM.
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2003-11-03, 03:43 PM   #74
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
One-wheel cyclists bound for NT

By ANTHONY BARICH
260 words
1 November 2003
Sunday Territorian
1 -
80
English
(c) 2003

The Unicycling Association of the NT (UniANT) has beaten Brisbane, Campbelltown and Castlemaine for the right to host the 2005 National Unicycling Championships (UniNats '05).

UniNats '05 will involve track racing, mountain unicycling, hockey, basketball, freestyle riding and urban trials -- all on one wheel. UniANT expects more than 100 riders to attend the July 2-5 nationals.

UniANT will host UniNats '05 at various venues around the Top End after joining with Tourism Top End and NT Athletics to make the bid.

"UniANT put forth a very professional bid promoting Darwin and the Top End," said Wayne Van Wijk, Brisbane-based president of AUS (Australian Unicycling Society), the sport's national body.

"The AUS looks forward to working with UniANT to put on a sporting event unlike anything the Territory has seen before."

The winning bid was announced on Thursday at Fannie Bay at a demonstration ride by the NT's champion unicyclists from the recent nationals.

Continued: Page 77

NT to host titles

From Back Page

UniANT president Karen Martin-Stone said unicycling is a young sport in the NT -- at the recent UniNats, riders ranged in age from 7-71.

"You can learn to unicycle, whatever age you are," Martin-Stone said.

"It is an excellent sport for people seeking something exciting, challenging and unique."

Australia's female National Mountain Unicycling champion Debbie Hyder is now introducing adult classes to Darwin.

People interested in learning to ride can visit www.UnicyclingNT.com or phone Hyder on 8983 3898.
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2003-11-10, 08:00 PM   #75
JJuggle
Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
 
JJuggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Matawan, NJ, USA
Age: 57
Posts: 8,171
Send a message via AIM to JJuggle
A short one, but another school uni club.

Pedaling for perfection

94 words
5 November 2003
St. Petersburg Times
1; 1; 3B
English
Copyright 2003 St. Petersburg Times.

(ran SS edition of METRO & STATE)

Katrina Sawaska, 9, from left, Kaitlin Castle, 10, and Lindsey Norton, 8, practice Tuesday with Oldsmar Elementary School's unicycle club in Oldsmar. Members of the club, founded in 1995 by school principal David Schmitt, plan to ride in the Safety Harbor and the Oldsmar Days parades and a school talent show.
__________________
Raphael Lasar

To Plotz is Human
To Shvitz Divine
JJuggle is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
articles, unicycle, wait


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:17 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2001-2016 Gilby
You Rated this Thread:
Page generated in 0.14175 seconds with 10 queries