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Old 2018-05-28, 01:16 PM   #16
song
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You might take bigger and harder falls on a large unicycle, but you might also find that the extra 8” (which will feel like at least a foot ) of elevation allows more time to prepare for landing. In my first weeks of riding unicycles, I was terrified of anything larger than a 20, but last weekend, an acquaintance of mine tried to learn to ride on my 29, and did far better than expected. He learned to freemount almost immediately, before doing anything else (which is unusual), and then, within 20 minutes or so, always freemounting, had managed to go for several rides of 1 or 2 revolutions. He did have some background doing crazy things on a mountain bike, and that may have helped. He wasn’t one of those wobbly people who have to be shown how to place their foot on the pedal or anything like that.
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Old 2018-05-28, 08:38 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by song View Post
but you might also find that the extra 8” (which will feel like at least a foot :d)
:d:d
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Old 2018-05-28, 09:52 PM   #18
SAABoy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saskatchewanian View Post
I've seen someone learn on a 36. Despite what others may say on here it can be done, has been done, and will be done again, possibly by you... but it is easier to do on a smaller wheel.

If this is your first unicycle and you are set on learning on a 36 the standard configuration is just about spot on. Cut the seatpost down to fit, but try to keep it as long as possible, you are likely to end up riding with it higher than you would ever consider as a beginner, especially if you later go down a crank size or two.

You might want to add a handlebar later, and possibly a brake if you find some hills, but leave them off until you are comfortable riding without.
Quote:
Originally Posted by unibokk View Post
@ SAAboy

I would not recommend learning on a 36er for fear of you having a bad fall

However if you decide to do so then I would recommend that you wear safety gear and a backpack filled with cushioning.


Should you feel yourself falling off then throw yourself forward because falling backwards off a 36er could be very dangerous.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikefule View Post
Once you can ride, a 36 is easier to ride than a smaller uni, but it remains more effort to mount. Changes of speed and direction are more effort, and sudden stops can result in a dismount. Learning on a 20 or 24 would be much easier, but you can learn on a 36.

Unquestionably, 36 is a good size for a 5 mile flat commute. I'd say buy the best uni you can afford, and get one with twin hole cranks so that later you can experiment without further expenditure.

It takes a moderate level of skill and familiarity before you can use a bar at all, and a lot of practice before a bar becomes genuinely useful. In the early stages, even riding with one hand on your seat handle is a challenge.

I can only go by my own experience, which is that I used to do regular 10-20 mile rides without a bar and never needed one. I now have a simple bar set up that I use mainly when cruising in a straight line. i ride on and off road and, although I live in the flatlands, I go looking for hills wherever I can find them, and I have never needed a brake.

For me, the joy of a uni is its simplicity, and everything that you add tot he uni subtracts from that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by unibokk View Post
P.S.

165mm cranks would allow you to set the saddle lower. The extra torque should be helpful when making the constant balance corrections that beginners usually need to make.

I would recommend 137/165 twin hole cranks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
Question: How many stop signs / stop lights are there along the 5 mile route? If there are many, then I suggest you go with a smaller size wheel. Also, are there pedestrians, parked cars and other obstacles you need to swerve around? If so, I suggest a smaller wheel. If you're choosing a 36" because it'll get you there faster, please be aware that it won't be 36/29 x faster than a 29" or 36/26 x faster than a 26". The bigger wheel will likely slow down your cadence relative to a smaller wheel. And the 36", at higher cadence, will put you into the danger zone where you may not be able to outrun a UPD (un-planned-dismount).

I live in the Southland. There are many awesome muni trails. Much more fun than a 5 mile commute on pavement. If you bought one of the newer 27.5" mountain unicycles, you could commute with it and go off-roading. Your 5-mile commute would only last about 15 more minutes with the smaller wheel. You'd probably be more willing to stop and walk across intersections, which is safer. I've read the posts of other novice 36" riders who wanted to learn to idle and hop (which are great skills and should be learned)...to avoid having to re-mount (which is more difficult on a 36"). This IMHO, is a bad idea. Novice riders are generally unaware of anything outside their narrow, forward focus. I've been riding for 4 years and I walk my unicycle across intersections. Be safe.

Good luck. Keep us posted. There are organized rides in the LA area. Some flatland, some Muni, occasional 36er rides. Send me a PM if you want to be added to the mailing list for SoCal unicycle events (maintained by the dad of one of our riders).
Quote:
Originally Posted by song View Post
+1

Yeah, more specifically, the easy way is to get a cheap 20" unicycle from Craigslist and spend a few days, weeks or months learning to ride, then, after that, spend a few hundred pesos on your large wheel. Just in terms of finding a space to practice, a 20" is also much easier. If you get going on a 36-inch wheel, each revolution of the pedals takes you almost 10 feet, so for learning to ride, you would have to find a parking lot that is spacious and doesn't have many people around to distract you by laughing, crying or videotaping when you fall off over and over again. On a 20, you can practice almost anywhere, maybe even in your own basement.

A five-mile commute would definitely be feasible (and enjoyable) on a 36, or even a 29, especially if you have a good place to leave your unicycle while you're at work, and if you are sure you won't get fired for being a one-wheeled weirdo, or for being all sweaty.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikefule View Post
Or, indeed, on a 26, 28 or 29. The differences in rolling diameter are small enough to be a matter of preference and nuance. Tyre availability is an issue, but there are plenty of good Muni tyres in the other sizes. There is nothing wrong with 27.5" but nothing special or unique about it either.

A good general purpose unicycle sits somewhere in that size range.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LargeEddie View Post
You're also more than a foot higher off the ground and moving at a considerably greater speed on the many, many occasions when you rapidly dismount the unicycle. The chances of staying on your feet and avoiding injury will be quite a bit smaller. But as saskatchewanian says, it's been done.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikefule View Post
Pedantry alert. Assuming the same distance between hub and seat, the difference in seat height between two unicycles is the difference between the radius of the wheels. 18 - 10 = 8, and 8 inches is nearer to half a foot than it is to a foot.

However, you would generally use slightly longer cranks to control the larger wheel, and, if so, this lowers the seat relative to the hub.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LargeEddie View Post

s/more than/the better part of/
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMason View Post
I suggest buying the Titan 36 (I have one that I've put well over a thousand miles on without issue) as a carrot and then find a 20 or 24 on Craigslist. Seeing the 36 will help keep you motivated to stay with it. I can't imagine learning on a 36 though. It can be tiring to get back on repeatedly even while hanging on to something.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unipig View Post
I'm interested to hear how learning on a 36 works out. Learning to mount sucks but think they are way easier to ride.
Quote:
Originally Posted by song View Post
You might take bigger and harder falls on a large unicycle, but you might also find that the extra 8” (which will feel like at least a foot ) of elevation allows more time to prepare for landing. In my first weeks of riding unicycles, I was terrified of anything larger than a 20, but last weekend, an acquaintance of mine tried to learn to ride on my 29, and did far better than expected. He learned to freemount almost immediately, before doing anything else (which is unusual), and then, within 20 minutes or so, always freemounting, had managed to go for several rides of 1 or 2 revolutions. He did have some background doing crazy things on a mountain bike, and that may have helped. He wasn’t one of those wobbly people who have to be shown how to place their foot on the pedal or anything like that.
testing
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Old 2018-05-29, 12:04 AM   #19
SAABoy
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Thank you, all, for your help despite my seemingly reckless, perhaps flippant, first post. I am pleasantly surprised by all your support Per your suggestions I did buy a $20 craigslist uni this weekend and this morning I completed the 2nd of my 30-minute practice sessions; once mounted next to a railing I can ride forwards with small turns for up to 15 seconds if the path is slightly downhill or flat. I'll be doing front flips on my 36" uni in no time!

Photo of 20" $20 https://photos.app.goo.gl/MA5HOOPmdTlLwpnj1

Should I buy a new UDC Titan 36" for $450USD shipped or a used MTB uni from a member here for $425-475 + shipping? Paraphrased uni details and link to photos below:

Photos of not-yet-assembled uni: https://photos.app.goo.gl/Ky6ZvJmX7I8OAuGl1
Basic Build - $425 + Shipping:
---------
Quax White Aluminum 36 Frame -new
KH Zero Saddle with Seatpost -used good
Nimbus Niterider Tire - used good
tube/spokes - used good
Nimbus Rim - used
KH Moment ISIS Hub - used good
KH Pedals (Clear/Blue) - used good
Sun CrMo ISIS Cranks 152mm - used good

Add Disc Brake - +$50.00 (= $475.00 + shipping)
--------
Shimano Hydraulic Disc Brake - used good
Under-saddle brake mount - new
MountainUni UCM Caliper Mount (similar to Nimbus D-Brake) -used good
External disc crank (110/125mm, 155mm, or 160mm - choose one)



Quote:
Originally Posted by saskatchewanian View Post
I've seen someone learn on a 36. Despite what others may say on here it can be done, has been done, and will be done again, possibly by you... but it is easier to do on a smaller wheel.

If this is your first unicycle and you are set on learning on a 36 the standard configuration is just about spot on. Cut the seatpost down to fit, but try to keep it as long as possible, you are likely to end up riding with it higher than you would ever consider as a beginner, especially if you later go down a crank size or two.

You might want to add a handlebar later, and possibly a brake if you find some hills, but leave them off until you are comfortable riding without.
"and will be done again, possibly by you... " thank you, that's all I needed to hear.

Quote:
Originally Posted by unibokk View Post
@ SAAboy

I would not recommend learning on a 36er for fear of you having a bad fall

However if you decide to do so then I would recommend that you wear safety gear and a backpack filled with cushioning.


Should you feel yourself falling off then throw yourself forward because falling backwards off a 36er could be very dangerous.
OK, I'll beware the backwards "UPD".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikefule View Post
Once you can ride, a 36 is easier to ride than a smaller uni, but it remains more effort to mount. Changes of speed and direction are more effort, and sudden stops can result in a dismount. Learning on a 20 or 24 would be much easier, but you can learn on a 36.

Unquestionably, 36 is a good size for a 5 mile flat commute. I'd say buy the best uni you can afford, and get one with twin hole cranks so that later you can experiment without further expenditure.

It takes a moderate level of skill and familiarity before you can use a bar at all, and a lot of practice before a bar becomes genuinely useful. In the early stages, even riding with one hand on your seat handle is a challenge.

I can only go by my own experience, which is that I used to do regular 10-20 mile rides without a bar and never needed one. I now have a simple bar set up that I use mainly when cruising in a straight line. i ride on and off road and, although I live in the flatlands, I go looking for hills wherever I can find them, and I have never needed a brake.

For me, the joy of a uni is its simplicity, and everything that you add tot he uni subtracts from that.
OK, I'll keep it simple.

Quote:
Originally Posted by unibokk View Post
P.S.

165mm cranks would allow you to set the saddle lower. The extra torque should be helpful when making the constant balance corrections that beginners usually need to make.

I would recommend 137/165 twin hole cranks.
It doesn't look like the UDC Titan 36 has a twin-hole crank option, neither does the used setup :/

Quote:
Originally Posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
Question: How many stop signs / stop lights are there along the 5 mile route? If there are many, then I suggest you go with a smaller size wheel. Also, are there pedestrians, parked cars and other obstacles you need to swerve around? If so, I suggest a smaller wheel. If you're choosing a 36" because it'll get you there faster, please be aware that it won't be 36/29 x faster than a 29" or 36/26 x faster than a 26". The bigger wheel will likely slow down your cadence relative to a smaller wheel. And the 36", at higher cadence, will put you into the danger zone where you may not be able to outrun a UPD (un-planned-dismount).

I live in the Southland. There are many awesome muni trails. Much more fun than a 5 mile commute on pavement. If you bought one of the newer 27.5" mountain unicycles, you could commute with it and go off-roading. Your 5-mile commute would only last about 15 more minutes with the smaller wheel. You'd probably be more willing to stop and walk across intersections, which is safer. I've read the posts of other novice 36" riders who wanted to learn to idle and hop (which are great skills and should be learned)...to avoid having to re-mount (which is more difficult on a 36"). This IMHO, is a bad idea. Novice riders are generally unaware of anything outside their narrow, forward focus. I've been riding for 4 years and I walk my unicycle across intersections. Be safe.

Good luck. Keep us posted. There are organized rides in the LA area. Some flatland, some Muni, occasional 36er rides. Send me a PM if you want to be added to the mailing list for SoCal unicycle events (maintained by the dad of one of our riders).
There are about 15 stoplights. The whole way has bike lanes lined with parked cars on one side, not many pedestrians. Thank you for the offer, I'll PM you for group rides in my area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by song View Post
+1

Yeah, more specifically, the easy way is to get a cheap 20" unicycle from Craigslist and spend a few days, weeks or months learning to ride, then, after that, spend a few hundred pesos on your large wheel. Just in terms of finding a space to practice, a 20" is also much easier. If you get going on a 36-inch wheel, each revolution of the pedals takes you almost 10 feet, so for learning to ride, you would have to find a parking lot that is spacious and doesn't have many people around to distract you by laughing, crying or videotaping when you fall off over and over again. On a 20, you can practice almost anywhere, maybe even in your own basement.

A five-mile commute would definitely be feasible (and enjoyable) on a 36, or even a 29, especially if you have a good place to leave your unicycle while you're at work, and if you are sure you won't get fired for being a one-wheeled weirdo, or for being all sweaty.
Done. Bought the 20" $20 craigslist uni

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikefule View Post
Or, indeed, on a 26, 28 or 29. The differences in rolling diameter are small enough to be a matter of preference and nuance. Tyre availability is an issue, but there are plenty of good Muni tyres in the other sizes. There is nothing wrong with 27.5" but nothing special or unique about it either.

A good general purpose unicycle sits somewhere in that size range.
Already saw the $30+ 36" uni inner tube. Parts will be pricey I guess :/

Quote:
Originally Posted by LargeEddie View Post
You're also more than a foot higher off the ground and moving at a considerably greater speed on the many, many occasions when you rapidly dismount the unicycle. The chances of staying on your feet and avoiding injury will be quite a bit smaller. But as saskatchewanian says, it's been done.
If saskatchewanian thinks I can do, then I can do it. I think.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikefule View Post
Pedantry alert. Assuming the same distance between hub and seat, the difference in seat height between two unicycles is the difference between the radius of the wheels. 18 - 10 = 8, and 8 inches is nearer to half a foot than it is to a foot.

However, you would generally use slightly longer cranks to control the larger wheel, and, if so, this lowers the seat relative to the hub.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LargeEddie View Post

s/more than/the better part of/
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMason View Post
I suggest buying the Titan 36 (I have one that I've put well over a thousand miles on without issue) as a carrot and then find a 20 or 24 on Craigslist. Seeing the 36 will help keep you motivated to stay with it. I can't imagine learning on a 36 though. It can be tiring to get back on repeatedly even while hanging on to something.
I now have a 20" from craigslist. Wow a thousand miles! What color is yours? Would've been cool if the Titan 36 was all black I'm leaning towards placing the order for a titan 36" tonight.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unipig View Post
I'm interested to hear how learning on a 36 works out. Learning to mount sucks but think they are way easier to ride.
Thanks, I'm 60 minutes into 20" training, will hop on a 36" as soon as I buy one and it arrives.

Quote:
Originally Posted by song View Post
You might take bigger and harder falls on a large unicycle, but you might also find that the extra 8” (which will feel like at least a foot ) of elevation allows more time to prepare for landing. In my first weeks of riding unicycles, I was terrified of anything larger than a 20, but last weekend, an acquaintance of mine tried to learn to ride on my 29, and did far better than expected. He learned to freemount almost immediately, before doing anything else (which is unusual), and then, within 20 minutes or so, always freemounting, had managed to go for several rides of 1 or 2 revolutions. He did have some background doing crazy things on a mountain bike, and that may have helped. He wasn’t one of those wobbly people who have to be shown how to place their foot on the pedal or anything like that.
Thanks my previous experience is cycling and some slacklining, not sure if the latter will help or hurt :P
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Old 2018-05-29, 01:59 AM   #20
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I think the white one looks pretty good. That's what I would lean towards.
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Old 2018-05-29, 03:14 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by SAABoy View Post
That looks like a 1970s Schwinn with an extremely uncomfortable seat. Those metal bumpers will probably get bent and scraped (if they aren't already), and will begin digging holes in your legs. When I had a seat like that, I always had to put medical tape on my inner thighs before riding. Oh well, at least your seatpost, being a Schwinn, won't spin around in its socket the way mine did, and Schwinns are quite sturdy.

If you are already going for 15-second rides without touching the fence at all after launching, you are doing very well. Over the Internet, it is hard to predict how fast someone will learn, (Sometimes people post on here who weigh 400 pounds, and they struggle for months or just disappear, or both.) but it sounds to me like you might as well get that 36 you are looking at. It seems like a pretty good deal. You will still want to keep that 20" handy, though, as you can acquire a lot of skills on it in addition to basic riding, (at least if that seat doesn't kill you) and all of these skills will come much more quickly than on a 36.

I slacklined before learning to unicycle. It might have helped. Riding a unicycle is more about charging forward, though, at least in the early stages, rather than concentrating and finding that precise point of balance as you try to do on a slackline.

Going through intersections should not be a problem once you can ride smoothly. Hopping in place is the best way to wait for traffic lights on a 36, as idling can be difficult with so much rotational momentum. Until you learn to hop, you can always grab a stop sign or a friendly pedestrian's shoulder for support.
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Old 2018-05-29, 03:46 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SAABoy View Post
...Should I buy a new UDC Titan 36" for $450USD shipped or a used MTB uni from a member here for $425-475 + shipping? ...
I see more pros than cons for that used one assuming shipping is not outlandish.

The big differences are:
You get an aluminum frame with machined bearing holders with 100mm spacing, which is important if you ever want to upgrade to a Schlumpf hub, and allow reasonable Q-factor when using external disk setups.
You get a ISIS hub and cranks, which gives you more options, including dual hole cranks and the ability to easily use an external disk.
Some assembly required? is the seller going to build the wheel or just sell you the parts? It could be a great learning experience.
The Zero is kind of a love it or hate it saddle, It's probably not a deal breaker.

The disk brake setup with the SINZ cranks is pretty decent for XC type trail riding etc, and the crank length would be OK for learning on but you would find them a bit long after a while on the road. They can be shortened, but I advise against double holing them, I wrecked a few pair that way.

I don't know who the seller is but judging from their selection of parts they have good taste in unicycles
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Last edited by saskatchewanian; 2018-05-29 at 03:47 AM.
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Old 2018-05-29, 05:59 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SAABoy View Post
Per your suggestions I did buy a $20 craigslist uni this weekend and this morning I completed the 2nd of my 30-minute practice sessions; once mounted next to a railing I can ride forwards with small turns for up to 15 seconds if the path is slightly downhill or flat. I'll be doing front flips on my 36" uni in no time!
That's pretty quick progress! Yes, you have a 70's Schwinn uni, with a "downgraded" seat and post. But that seat will serve for a while; you'll know if it's getting too banged up to keep using. I think it's of a later type, which doesn't deform so much from drops (earlier ones, esp. without the bumpers, would bend really badly).
Quote:
Originally Posted by SAABoy
Should I buy a new UDC Titan 36" for $450USD shipped or a used MTB uni from a member here for $425-475 + shipping?
The "MTB uni" is also a 36", and is a pretty sweet collection of parts for that price. I'd go with that, though the photos are missing some bits: Rim, spokes, seat post and some other details. The saddle in the photo (KH Fusion Zero) uses a specialized post, Pivot style, which you may want to not invest in yet, Those seats aren't super popular, and were designed for people who do lots and lots of miles. The Fusion One followed, and people that like either, mostly like the One a lot more.

To upgrade your Schwinn's seat, you will also need a Schwinn-style post. Unicycle.com has them (I think you just cut it down if it's too long. The Schwinn saddle mount is the same as what Nimbus and KH use now.
Quote:
Originally Posted by song View Post
Oh well, at least your seatpost, being a Schwinn, won't spin around in its socket the way mine did, and Schwinns are quite sturdy.
Yes to all except it probably isn't a Schwinn post, unless the top was cut off; those saddles usually attach like a seat clamp to a bare tube.
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Old 2018-06-04, 09:36 PM   #24
SAABoy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uni Klein View Post
I think the white one looks pretty good. That's what I would lean towards.
Quote:
Originally Posted by saskatchewanian View Post
I see more pros than cons for that used one assuming shipping is not outlandish.

The big differences are:
You get an aluminum frame with machined bearing holders with 100mm spacing, which is important if you ever want to upgrade to a Schlumpf hub, and allow reasonable Q-factor when using external disk setups.
You get a ISIS hub and cranks, which gives you more options, including dual hole cranks and the ability to easily use an external disk.
Some assembly required? is the seller going to build the wheel or just sell you the parts? It could be a great learning experience.
The Zero is kind of a love it or hate it saddle, It's probably not a deal breaker.

The disk brake setup with the SINZ cranks is pretty decent for XC type trail riding etc, and the crank length would be OK for learning on but you would find them a bit long after a while on the road. They can be shortened, but I advise against double holing them, I wrecked a few pair that way.

I don't know who the seller is but judging from their selection of parts they have good taste in unicycles
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnfoss View Post
That's pretty quick progress! Yes, you have a 70's Schwinn uni, with a "downgraded" seat and post. But that seat will serve for a while; you'll know if it's getting too banged up to keep using. I think it's of a later type, which doesn't deform so much from drops (earlier ones, esp. without the bumpers, would bend really badly).
The "MTB uni" is also a 36", and is a pretty sweet collection of parts for that price. I'd go with that, though the photos are missing some bits: Rim, spokes, seat post and some other details. The saddle in the photo (KH Fusion Zero) uses a specialized post, Pivot style, which you may want to not invest in yet, Those seats aren't super popular, and were designed for people who do lots and lots of miles. The Fusion One followed, and people that like either, mostly like the One a lot more.

To upgrade your Schwinn's seat, you will also need a Schwinn-style post. Unicycle.com has them (I think you just cut it down if it's too long. The Schwinn saddle mount is the same as what Nimbus and KH use now.
Yes to all except it probably isn't a Schwinn post, unless the top was cut off; those saddles usually attach like a seat clamp to a bare tube.
I've updated the google link with pictures of the non-brake photos from the seller post-assembly. Am I missing anything or is this good to go? I'm leaning towards leaving out the brake option and paying him $50 less.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/Ky6ZvJmX7I8OAuGl1
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Old 2018-06-04, 11:19 PM   #25
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Brake use in unicycles is very subjective (as are all things uni-related). But if the difference is only $50, I would recommend going ahead and getting it. It would be much more expensive to add later, and you may find you like it. (I drag the brake on long downhills all the time, and every time I dismount -- makes a proper rear dismount work exactly the way it ought to). I love having the brake!

Just my opinion. Good luck!
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Old 2018-06-05, 05:50 AM   #26
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Seriously?

Proofs in the pudding.
Buy it. Try it. Report back. Honestly.
Good luck.

Last edited by slamdance; 2018-06-05 at 05:52 AM. Reason: Reason for Editing
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Old 2018-06-05, 08:35 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by slamdance View Post
Proofs in the pudding.
Buy it. Try it. Report back. Honestly.
Good luck.
"The proof of the pudding is in the eating." (The way to tell if something is any good is not to theorise about it or look at it, but to try it.)

My old boss used to say "The proof's in the pudding," and it still makes me grind my teeth.
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Old 2018-06-05, 06:59 PM   #28
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You can substitute "The proof is in the pizza dough."

Pizza (and probably many other types) dough needs time to "proof" before it gets thrown around and flattened into a pizza shape.
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