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Old 2009-04-21, 03:05 PM   #16
tholub
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Originally Posted by rob.northcott View Post
You're the second person I've seen on this forum actually advocating cycling on the wrong side of the road. Apart from being extremely dangerous (OK, you can see the cars coming towards you, but other road users don't expect a cyclist to be travelling the wrong way along the road!) it's utterly illegal (or is it not in the US?)
It's illegal to the extent that unicycles are classified as bicycles.
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Old 2009-04-21, 05:11 PM   #17
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If you havn't already tried and if it hasn't already been mentioned (didn't see it) try more/less air in the tyre, can make a big difference...
Thanks. I did a couple of runs experimenting with tire pressure.

I increased to 60 psi. That's a "firm" ride, runs well on payment, but digs on a "sort of" groomed packed, crush rock cycle trail particularly the soft spots.

For now, I've settled on about 50psi as better compromise on the camber (although there was no wind that day to judge all the variables) and for the non-paved that I mentioned.
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Old 2009-04-21, 08:18 PM   #18
Harley
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Originally Posted by rob.northcott View Post
You're the second person I've seen on this forum actually advocating cycling on the wrong side of the road. Apart from being extremely dangerous (OK, you can see the cars coming towards you, but other road users don't expect a cyclist to be travelling the wrong way along the road!) it's utterly illegal (or is it not in the US?)

Surely picking the side of the road to ride on willy-nilly isn't a sensible solution to camber problems.

Rob
First off I didn't advocate anything. I just mentioned that I sometimes ride on the left facing traffic in order to beat road crown issues. As for it being extremely dangerous, I'm quite comfortable with it as I'm able to see the traffic coming and can step off the uni at any time and get out of the way. It's much safer for me than continually trying to look over my shoulder to see if traffic is coming. I do not ride on busy streets in this manner only on quite residential side streets. (If that matters)

Secondly I'm located in Canada so I couldn't tell you whether or not its utterly illegal in the US or not.

Guess I'm just trying to get back to my British heritage. Always wanted to drive on the left side of the road.

Another thing that might alarm you is that I sometimes let my dog drive the truck, but don't worry too much because never for even a second is he off his leash while he's behind the wheel. (credit to Garry Larson) I use the dog as a willy-nilly solution if I'm to tired to drive on my own.
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Old 2012-02-22, 09:49 PM   #19
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I thought it might be my imagination, but the more my nightrider tire wears down, the flatter/squarer the profile becomes, which in turn makes even slightly off-camber road surfaces increasingly noticeable, even at full 65 psi.

I'm now more convinced that as the tire becomes more worn on the center most part of the tire, thus reducing the original rounded shape, it increases the contact area of the tire to the road surface. And it's pretty well established that the more square the tire profile, the more "self-steering" and camber issues you will have.

So I'm wondering if it's time get a new nightrider tire and start fresh with a rounder profile, which I'm assuming will reduce these issues considerably. I must have at least 8-10k miles on my current nightrider, which includes off-road riding as well.
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Last edited by MuniAddict; 2012-02-22 at 09:54 PM.
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Old 2012-02-22, 11:26 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by IUni View Post
Today, I picked a not so pleasant 36er ride on a road with not much verge, and excessive road camber, plus a quartering head/cross wind from my right. I had to take some minutes facing traffic on the left side of the road for a while just for some relief.

Aside from picking better rides, what are options to handle either camber, crosswind or a combo?
When it is head or side windy, close your umbrella, because being Mary Poppins on a unicycle can be a bit dangerous when gusts pull you towards traffic.

Something nobody has mentioned is riding higher up on the road crown, closer to where cars drive- if it is not too busy. You will need to keep an eye and an ear out for other vehicles so you can retreat back into the steeper side-camber bit. This would work well in conjunction with your wrong side of road method but would increase the oncoming traffic's surprise when they see you in their path.
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Originally Posted by rob.northcott View Post
You're the second person I've seen on this forum actually advocating cycling on the wrong side of the road. Apart from being extremely dangerous (OK, you can see the cars coming towards you, but other road users don't expect a cyclist to be travelling the wrong way along the road!) it's utterly illegal (or is it not in the US?)

Surely picking the side of the road to ride on willy-nilly isn't a sensible solution to camber problems.
Surely picking a unicycle to ride at all isn't sensible! Do you not ride? Unicycling is more similar to running than bicycling, and for visibility the wrong side may be safer- or more dangerous depending on the road and conditions. Real safety is more important than perceived legality, as that is what safety laws are imposed for.
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Originally Posted by MuniAddict View Post
I thought it might be my imagination, but the more my nightrider tire wears down, the flatter/squarer the profile becomes, which in turn makes even slightly off-camber road surfaces increasingly noticeable, even at full 65 psi.

I'm now more convinced that as the tire becomes more worn on the center most part of the tire, thus reducing the original rounded shape, it increases the contact area of the tire to the road surface. And it's pretty well established that the more square the tire profile, the more "self-steering" and camber issues you will have.

So I'm wondering if it's time get a new nightrider tire and start fresh with a rounder profile, which I'm assuming will reduce these issues considerably. I must have at least 8-10k miles on my current nightrider, which includes off-road riding as well.
You could shave down the sides of your nightrider. You might save weight and restore some of the roundness to it. I've seen it done to a new nightrider and it felt nice to ride, because the majority of the time most of the tire doesn't touch the ground anyway- those little knobbly thingies last for ages unless you turn really steep on purpose.

I'm too scared to pump my latest Nightrider up to max pressure after I had one blow off the side of the rim at 65psi. I don't exceed 50psi these days just in case. I think it was a manufacturing defect though- 65 should work.
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Old 2012-02-23, 12:48 AM   #21
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I'm too scared to pump my latest Nightrider up to max pressure after I had one blow off the side of the rim at 65psi. I don't exceed 50psi these days just in case. I think it was a manufacturing defect though- 65 should work.
Yeah I usually max out the psi around 50, which still feels very close to the max, probably because I'm not very heavy at 145lbs. I have also wondered if the newer coker tire might offer a better ride on the road, as far as camber is concerned.

I'd be very interested in hearing from anyone who has ridden this tire and even better if anyone has ridden *both* the newer coker tire and the nightrider, and how you would compare them for road riding.


Edit: The coker tire's max is only 32 psi, looks heavier than the nightrider, and the coker website describes it only as an offroad tire. Still would like to hear opinions on it.
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Last edited by MuniAddict; 2012-02-23 at 12:51 AM.
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Old 2012-02-23, 02:21 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MuniAddict View Post
I thought it might be my imagination, but the more my nightrider tire wears down, the flatter/squarer the profile becomes, which in turn makes even slightly off-camber road surfaces increasingly noticeable, even at full 65 psi.

I'm now more convinced that as the tire becomes more worn on the center most part of the tire, thus reducing the original rounded shape, it increases the contact area of the tire to the road surface. And it's pretty well established that the more square the tire profile, the more "self-steering" and camber issues you will have.

So I'm wondering if it's time get a new nightrider tire and start fresh with a rounder profile, which I'm assuming will reduce these issues considerably. I must have at least 8-10k miles on my current nightrider, which includes off-road riding as well.
This is definitely true of motorcycle tires (for turning more than camber, but same principle), so should be true for uni tires as well. Probably doesn't get discussed much because not many people ride enough to wear down tires like you do!


Quote:
Originally Posted by MuniAddict View Post
Yeah I usually max out the psi around 50, which still feels very close to the max, probably because I'm not very heavy at 145lbs. I have also wondered if the newer coker tire might offer a better ride on the road, as far as camber is concerned.

I'd be very interested in hearing from anyone who has ridden this tire and even better if anyone has ridden *both* the newer coker tire and the nightrider, and how you would compare them for road riding.


Edit: The coker tire's max is only 32 psi, looks heavier than the nightrider, and the coker website describes it only as an offroad tire. Still would like to hear opinions on it.
My Coker came with the non-skid tire, and I've never ridden another 36 tire. So no basis to compare, but I've been very happy with the non-skid. Nice rounded profile, and I notice camber on this very little, and much less than my (former) guni with 26x2.4 Ardent. It seems to roll fine on pavement, there is a constant contact thread so it's not bumpy. At the same time, it has really good traction, on everything from loose gravel to snow and ice (I've ridden it on icy days when people were having trouble walking - got some great comments that way). I keep thinking of getting a Nightrider tire, for higher pressure and lower weight. But then I go on another mixed surface ride on my 36er, love it, and figure there's no reason to switch. So overall, my thought is that it's a great tire, with downsides being higher weight, and lower pressure (although pressure is only a disadvantage for road riding).
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Last edited by uniShark; 2012-02-23 at 02:24 AM.
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Old 2012-02-23, 06:18 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by MuniAddict View Post
So I'm wondering if it's time get a new nightrider tire and start fresh with a rounder profile, which I'm assuming will reduce these issues considerably. I must have at least 8-10k miles on my current nightrider, which includes off-road riding as well.
I think $82 every 10,000 miles is not an unreasonable expense. Why don't you get a new one and see how much difference it makes?

<off topic>
I like my old Coker Button tire. It does ok with road camber, and it doesn't pick up rocks and stuff when I ride off road. Are the newer ones much better? The only thing that really catches my eye is the 65 psi rating on the Nightrider tire, but people have had trouble with blow outs at that pressure...
</off topic>
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Old 2012-02-23, 06:45 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by aarons View Post
I think $82 every 10,000 miles is not an unreasonable expense. Why don't you get a new one and see how much difference it makes?
Yeah, I've been leaning in that direction!
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Old 2012-02-26, 04:59 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MuniAddict View Post
I thought it might be my imagination, but the more my nightrider tire wears down, the flatter/squarer the profile becomes, which in turn makes even slightly off-camber road surfaces increasingly noticeable, even at full 65 psi.
I noticed the same thing on my 19" today. The try-all tire has a pretty much square profile now that I've worn it down in the middle. I can definitely feel it pull me toward the gutter when I'm practicing in the street. I think I'll cut the knobs off the sides to try to round the profile again. I wonder how much difference it will make for tricks like crank idling.
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Old 2012-02-26, 04:56 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aarons View Post
<off topic>
I like my old Coker Button tire. It does ok with road camber, and it doesn't pick up rocks and stuff when I ride off road. Are the newer ones much better? The only thing that really catches my eye is the 65 psi rating on the Nightrider tire, but people have had trouble with blow outs at that pressure...
</off topic>
The button tire is probably better with chamber with how round it is, but more rolling resistance than the Coker XLR or Nightrider.
I don't think people should get quite too excited about the number written on the side of the tire. You can make the Coker tires just as hard. It says 32 psi on the side, but you can put them in the upper 40s easy, and no one seems to have problems with them blowing out or anything. The XLR is also definitely the smoothest tire, but since we are talking about chamber, it is also the most square so I'm sure Nightrider is better is this area.
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Old 2012-02-29, 04:28 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by IUni View Post
Today, I picked a not so pleasant 36er ride on a road with not much verge, and excessive road camber, plus a quartering head/cross wind from my right. I had to take some minutes facing traffic on the left side of the road for a while just for some relief.

Aside from picking better rides, what are options to handle either camber, crosswind or a combo?
Does the height of the unicycle or wheel diameter have anything to do with resistance to road crown pulling? It seems that a 20er pulls worse than a 26er, which is worse than a 36er. I don't notice road crown much on the 36er.

-jd
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Old 2012-02-29, 02:32 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by jamdallen View Post
Does the height of the unicycle or wheel diameter have anything to do with resistance to road crown pulling? It seems that a 20er pulls worse than a 26er, which is worse than a 36er. I don't notice road crown much on the 36er.

-jd
I reckon it's more to do with the profile of the tyre. My 36er (TA tyre) is by far the worst of my unicycles for camber problems. Tyre pressure makes quite a difference as well, although people seem to have different opinions on whether high or low pressure is better. My TA is not too bad up to about 25 psi (which is what I usually run it at) but anything above 30 psi and it wants to throw me into the hedge.

Rob
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Old 2012-03-02, 03:08 AM   #29
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I found this on google street. It appears that someone got it right. I think the round profile will climb the road crown. A better crown climbing profile would be a "V", but probably can't be shaped from a normal tire.
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