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Old 2017-12-01, 05:44 AM   #27
johnfoss
North Shore ridin'
 
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Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: El Dorado Hills, CA
Age: 56
Posts: 16,864
Quote:
Originally Posted by song View Post
As I said, when the first pedal you're going to step on arrives at the right position, you've got to be going really, really slowly- so slowly that if you stayed at that speed for more than a second or two, you would lose your balance.
I don't think it needs to be quite that sketchy, but you are accurately describing the general situation on returning to pedals.
Quote:
Originally Posted by song
At first, if that front pedal wasn't at a point just above 3 o'clock, all was lost. Now, if it's anywhere between 1 o'clock and 5 o'clock, I can usually get it, though I have to adapt slightly.
If you keep working at it, it will continue to get easier and will matter less and less where the pedals are.
[/quote]If I take a longer walk than the standard 6 steps, I have to plan my return to the pedals several steps in advance. I have to know where the pedals are, and slow my walk down so that I'll be grinding to a halt just as they come into position.[/QUOTE]Back when I did tons of Freestyle riding, mostly in gyms (which have a nice, predictable riding surface), I got to where I didn't even need to look down; I could feel where the pedals were. While I never really perfected that technique, it was always great when it worked. Mostly I would just do a little glance down. Once you see where the pedal is, you can calculate (with practice) the movements to get your feet onto them. Kind of like in juggling; if you can see where the ball peaks, your brain can fill in the rest of the arc and tell your hand where to meet it, even if you've closed your eyes.

Unicycling dreams:
I've definitely had some. I remember some where I did stuff that I'd never seen done in reality, but were tricks or techniques that should be learnable. Like going from the seat to a sideways wheel walk, to walking the wheel behind the seat (seat in front) to sideways walking on the other side of the uni, and back to the seat for a complete 360. I'm sure there are a bunch of people out there who can do that now if they want to practice it.

In recent years, unicycle-related dreams seem to have been more about arriving at Unicon and not being ready to compete, not having trained, showing up last-minute with no time to put the unicycles toghether, losing track of all my stuff, etc. More typical of dreams in which people worry. But now that I'm less competitive at the conventions, those have faded as well. Less pressure and more fun!
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John Foss
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"The miracle is this: the more we share, the more we have." -- Leonard Nimoy
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