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Kevin Gilbertson
2001-12-08, 06:29 PM
harper wrote:

> this list refers to fora as "forums" (nasty little cross-lingual
> plural, that)

I just looked it up in a dictionary
http://www.dictionary.com/cgi-bin/dict.pl?term=forum&r=67 and it says the
plural can be either forums or fora. But if you feel better about using
fora, you can access the fora at http://www.unicyclist.com/fora/

- Gilby

harper
2001-12-08, 08:37 PM
The same dictionary will tell you that radiuses is an acceptable plural of radius. Does that tweak your engineering nose or what, Kevin?

I also like octopuses, hippopotamuses, and indexes (rather than indices). Viruses, instead of viri, really irks me because I see it so often. Why is data (plural of datum) still widely used but stadia (plural of stadium) never used?

I think English was never meant to be taken seriously. It's kind of like a cartoon language....transient and flexible like the elastic, animated characters of old.

I likewise think that I am not to be taken too seriously. Please don't. But thanks for adding the link to "fora". That's a hoot. I'll have to remember to use it everyday.

Tom Holub
2001-12-08, 09:57 PM
In article <9utu4n$4b4$1@laurel.tc.umn.edu>, harper
<forum.member@unicyclist.com> wrote: ) Viruses, instead of viri, really
irks me because I see it so )often.

You probably see it often because it's correct, and viri isn't.

) Why is data (plural of datum) still widely used but stadia )(plural of
stadium) never used?

data is usually used in a sigular sense these days, and datum is
rarely used. If datum were commonly used, I'm sure we'd be pluralizing
it as datums.

)I think English was never meant to be taken seriously. It's kind of like
)a cartoon language....transient and flexible like the elastic, animated
)characters of old.

Language is what people speak to each other, and it has always been
transient and flexible. -Tom

Klaas Bil
2001-12-08, 10:12 PM
On Sat, 08 Dec 2001 12:29:21 -0600, Kevin Gilbertson
<mail@gilby.com> wrote:

>harper wrote:
>
> > this list refers to fora as "forums" (nasty little cross-lingual
> > plural, that)
>
>
>I just looked it up in a dictionary
>http://www.dictionary.com/cgi-bin/dict.pl?term=forum&r=67 and it says the
>plural can be either forums or fora. But if you feel better about using
>fora, you can access the fora at http://www.unicyclist.com/fora/

Funny, that. But apart from the url everything on the page is still
"forums". If you're serious about it (which I think you're not), download
iReplace. Google finds it. It does search and replace on multiple html
files. (I have no other connection to iReplace than that I downloaded it
the other day.)

Klaas Bil
--
"To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:" "Schengen, NAICC, mullah Mohammed Omar"

Chilliwack
2001-12-09, 09:02 AM
>)I think English was never meant to be taken seriously. It's kind of like
>)a cartoon language....transient and flexible like the elastic, animated
>)characters of old.

I like making fun of English(my mother tongue) too. We have silly grammatical rules, which we abuse by having exceptions for each one. Take the phrase "mother tongue." What does that have to do with my mom? I prefer French "langue maternelle." Anyways, maybe I like French because it doesn't seem all stupid to me, because I don't know it as well. (But I wish francophones wouldn't laugh at my accent..)
----------

I have to say that I see two identical postings from Klaas up there. I've seen it in other threads(not all). I post exclusively via (non-english word!!!) Unicyclist.com(thanks Gilby!) I most often see Klaas' postings doubled, but I've seen others here, and sometimes even quadrupled. The double postings seem to happen only from people who post via the newsgroup.

Caleb Penner

Unrelated Link (http://homepage.mac.com/cpenner/)

rebecca
2001-12-09, 12:22 PM
"Viruses, instead of viri, really irks me because I see it so often."
Viruses is the correct plural of virus. Not all Latin nouns ending in -us change to -i in the plural; only second declension nouns. I believe virus is fourth declension, so in Latin it would remain unchanged in the plural. In English, though, it is viruses. Viri is the plural of vir, viri, the second declension noun meaning man.

harper
2001-12-09, 04:33 PM
Oops...I'll change the subject (or my screen name) to hide my embarassment (for Klaas Bil the plural being embarassmenten).

I get double postings from Michael Grant and Klaas Bill occassionally. I usually get 5x postings from John Foss. Iget multiple postings from others sporadically.

rhysling
2001-12-09, 04:40 PM
Sorry, Rebbeca: out of pure long-hair solidarity, I have to side with Harper.

Originally posted by harper



Is so.


Ya, word to your mother!

Time to go sing the "You say toe-may-toe, I say toe-mah-toe" while practicing my run-on-sentace mount. Basami Juggling, anyone?

Christopher

rhysling
2001-12-09, 04:44 PM
Originally posted by harper

I get double postings from Michael Grant and Klaas Bill occassionally. I usually get 5x postings from John Foss. Iget multiple postings from others sporadically.

Ya, me to, in the same ratios (ratia?).

I view the forum via Gilby's service (thanx, Mr. G).

Christopher

harper
2001-12-09, 05:09 PM
You preach it, Christopher. If conquering forces and NPR journalists can change the face of language then so can unicyclists. I believe that the prefix, uni, is Latin in origin and that the root, cycle, is Greek. We've already begun. Now, let's wait for the plethora of plurals to pour in and we'll be ready to attack.

Viva le cheveux long, comrade!

Gilby
2001-12-09, 06:07 PM
Originally posted by harper
I get double postings from Michael Grant and Klaas Bill occassionally. I usually get 5x postings from John Foss. Iget multiple postings from others sporadically.

In the unicyclist.com forums you're all going to see the same double postings... it's a problem with the script I use to import posts from the newsgroup that is caused by emails that do not have the proper headers to thread it properly. So when my script has to figure out where to put the post, it sometimes multiplies them. I am not sure exactly what the cause of it is, but I'll look into it to see if there is an easy fix. I'm planning on rewriting the import script soon though to better suit these forums (I didn't write the original import script, but hacked it quite a bit). Sorry about the annoyance of the multiple postings.

rhysling
2001-12-09, 07:02 PM
Originally posted by Gilby

Sorry about the annoyance of the multiple postings.

Hey, man: you'r doing us a FAVOR- for nada. No need to apologise. You'ze 'da MAN!

Christopher

UniDak
2001-12-09, 07:06 PM
>"Language is what people speak to each other, and it has always been
transient and flexible. -Tom"

I cant agree with that statement! Vernacular is what people speak to each other, and it has always been
transient and flexible. Language is the way the vernacular is supposed to be spoken.
-David Kaplan

rhysling
2001-12-09, 07:45 PM
Originally posted by UniDak
. Language is the way the vernacular is supposed to be spoken.
-David Kaplan

Are you trying to entice me into missusing the word rassberry? Realy! Hrumph! I'd never! I.. I... oh, what the hell...

Pppphhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhttttttttttttttteeeerrrrrrrrrrrrrpppppp!

Ah- I feel much better.

Christopher

John Foss
2001-12-10, 07:01 PM
> I cant agree with that statement! Vernacular is what people speak to
> each other, and it has always been transient and flexible. Language is
> the way the vernacular is supposed to be spoken. -David Kaplan

I think he's right. Boy, am I glad I'm out of school!

JF

Jack Halpern
2001-12-11, 12:55 AM
Greetings

In message "RE: unicycle.com", John Foss wrote...
>> I cant agree with that statement! Vernacular is what people speak to
>> each other, and it has always been transient and flexible. Language is
>> the way the vernacular is supposed to be spoken. -David Kaplan
>
>I think he's right. Boy, am I glad I'm out of school!

As a linguist/lexicographer, let me add my two cents. "supposed" needs to
be expanded it on. As it stands, it sounds like you are promoting "the
prescriptive appraoch" as opposed to the "descriptive approach". The
former was mostly abandoned by professinoal lexicogrtaphers in the early
20th century. The modern approach is that there is no "wrong" or "right"
per se, but only within a *register* -- it's a long story and out of
place here.

Regards, Jack Halpern President, The CJK Dictionary Institute, Inc.
http://www.cjk.org (http://www.cjk.org/) Phone: +81-48-473-3508

rebecca
2001-12-11, 12:58 AM
Rhysling,
First, you misspelled my name. Second, this is my third semester taking Latin, so I really do know what I'm talking about. Second declension endings, singular and plural, are in order (nominitive, genitive, dative, accusative, ablative):
-us
-i
-o
-um
-o

-i
-orum
-is
-os
-is

Fourth declension endings are:
-us
-us
-ui
-um
-u

-us
-us
-ibus
-us
-ibus
(I'm not certain about all the plural endings, but I'm positive about nominitive, which is the one in question.)

In my experience, Latin does not allow two different words to have identical forms (hence the irregular filiabus and deabus for ablative and dative plural of filia and dea, as opposed to filiis and deis, which would make them identical to forms of deus and filius) So virus is almost definitely either fourth declension or has an irregular form. (I don't have my dictionary with me, but will look up tomorrow)

-R.

Gardner Buchanan
2001-12-11, 03:06 AM
In article <9uvl70$f3v$1@laurel.tc.umn.edu>, rebecca
<forum.member@unicyclist.com> writes:

> "Viruses, instead of viri, really irks me because I see it so often."
> Viruses is the correct plural of virus. Not all Latin nouns ending in
> -us change to -i in the plural; only second declension nouns. I believe
> virus is fourth declension, so in Latin it would remain unchanged in the
> plural. In English, though, it is viruses. Viri is the plural of vir,
> viri, the second declension noun meaning man.
>

Johnny Wayne: "Bartender! I'll have a Martinus please." Frank Shuster: "A
Martunus? You mean Martini." Johnny Wayne: "If I wanted two, I'd have
asked for them."

============================================================
Gardner Buchanan <gbuchana@rogers.com> Ottawa, ON FreeBSD: Where you want
to go. Today.

Klaas Bil
2001-12-11, 10:23 PM
Bartender! I'll have a rum please. You're lucky sir. It's happy hour.
You'll have ra for the price of rum.

Klaas Bil (in a fit of silliness)

On Tue, 11 Dec 2001 03:06:59 GMT, gardner@gromit.dhs.org (Gardner
Buchanan) wrote:

>In article <9uvl70$f3v$1@laurel.tc.umn.edu>, rebecca
><forum.member@unicyclist.com> writes:
>
>> "Viruses, instead of viri, really irks me because I see it so often."
>> Viruses is the correct plural of virus. Not all Latin nouns ending in
>> -us change to -i in the plural; only second declension nouns. I believe
>> virus is fourth declension, so in Latin it would remain unchanged in
>> the plural. In English, though, it is viruses. Viri is the plural of
>> vir, viri, the second declension noun meaning man.
>>
>
>Johnny Wayne: "Bartender! I'll have a Martinus please." Frank Shuster: "A
>Martunus? You mean Martini." Johnny Wayne: "If I wanted two, I'd have
>asked for them."
>
>============================================================
>Gardner Buchanan <gbuchana@rogers.com> Ottawa, ON FreeBSD: Where you want
>to go. Today.

--
"To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:" "SARA, ECOMMERCE, EODC"

rebecca
2001-12-11, 11:00 PM
Ok, I was wrong. Virus, viri is second declension, and it avoids being identical to a form of vir by having a macron (horizontal line) over the first i. Still, I think the correct English plural of virus is viruses. Dictionary.com agrees.

rhysling
2001-12-12, 12:41 AM
Ahh, Rebecca: resorting to internet references- how far we have fallen.

***insert juvanile sterio-typical indian war-wooop here***

I stand vidicated in my position of blindely backing a long-hair.

Harper's in 'da house! Harper's in 'da house! Ya!- 'dat's right!


Christopher

"Let the Wagons of blind ignorance form an impenitrable curten whence well reasoned thought can not penetrate." -myself, just now.

rebecca
2001-12-12, 02:23 AM
What's wrong with using internet references?

Kevin Gilbertson
2001-12-12, 04:03 AM
rebecca wrote:

> What's wrong with using internet references?

He thinks you need to unicycle through 10 feet of snow, uphill, in the
dark, 10 miles to get to a library to look it up. He's just not used to
the "click click click, there we go" method yet to get 10 different
entries for the same word from different references all in a couple
clicks. It just can't be reliable if it's that easy.

- Gilby

harper
2001-12-12, 04:42 AM
There is absolutely nothing wrong with internet references. Likewise, there is absolutely nothing wrong with decaf coffee, filtered low-tar cigarettes, diet soda, fat free cookies, light beer or wine, condensed books, fast food, and sugar-free gum. There's nothing wrong with riding on two wheels, either...it's just not that fulfilling.

jagur
2001-12-12, 06:34 AM
a well known book is faster than any connection speed>>>>> i would ride in 10 feet of snow,, in the dark,, uphill,, for 10 miles ,,for a light beer!!!!!!!!!

John Foss
2001-12-12, 05:17 PM
> There is absolutely nothing wrong with internet references. Likewise,
> there is absolutely nothing wrong with decaf coffee, filtered low-tar
> cigarettes, diet soda, fat free cookies, light beer or wine, condensed
> books, fast food, and sugar-free gum. There's nothing wrong with riding
> on two wheels, either...it's just not that fulfilling.

You're saying the Internet is not good for you? I think its only negative
effect on your health is the exercise you won't get by going to the
bookshelf or library...

I think what people were saying about Internet references is that they are
far less reliable. If you are on the New York Times or Webster's Web
sites, those are pretty reliable references. But if you find an answer to
your question at www.hotmail.com/~jeff/stuff/notes/roughideas/faq.htm (http://www.hotmail.com/~jeff/stuff/notes/roughideas/faq.htm), you
must take it with a grain of salt.

In other words, publishing books that end up in libraries is so
cost-intensive that a very small amount of wrong information gets in
there. Conversely on the Internet, anybody can publish any nonsense at
all. It is up to the reader to separate the junk from the facts.

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com (http://www.unicycling.com/)

"If it weren't for the last minute, nothing would get done." - Kevin
"Gilby" Gilbertson

rebecca
2001-12-27, 07:38 PM
I'm reading Words and Rules by Steven Pinker and encountered this passage:

"Finally, there are nouns that take Latin or Greek plurals...Here are four families with Latin plurals:

alumnus-alumni; also bacillus, cactus, focus, fungus, locus, nucleus, radius, stimulus
genus-genera, corpus-corpora
alga-algae; also alumna, formula, larva, nebula, vertebra
addendum-addenda; also bacterium, curriculum, datum, desideratum, erratum, maximum, medium, memorandum, millenium, moratorium, ovum, referendum, spectrum, stratum, symposium
appendix-appendices; also index, matrix, vortex

And here are two familise with Greek plurals:

analysis-analyses; also axis, diagnosis, ellipsis, hypothesis, parenthesis, synopsis, synthesis, thesis
criterion-criteria; also automaton, ganglion, phenomenon

These nouns come from science and academia, and the plurals were borrowed directly from Latin or Greek together with the singulars. They must be irregular forms that are learned as a list, not the products of a rule attaching -i or -ae, because most nouns shun these plurals except in the speech of people with an attitude:

apparatus-apparatuses; also bonus, campus, caucus, census, chorus, circus, impetus, prospectus, sinus, status, VIRUS
area-areas; also arena, dilemma, diploma, drama, era, etc.
album-albums; also aquarium, chrysanthemum, FORUM, museum, premium, stadium, ultimatum

Latin- and Greek-inspired plurals in a sense are still not part of the English language. They are not acquired as part of the mother tongue in childhood, and are uncommon in everyday speech among nonacademic adults. Instead, they are learned in school together with the Pythagorean theorem and the dates of the Peloponesian War. Since they follow no living rule, and people couldn't have memorized them unless they went to the right schools and read teh right books, they are shibboleths of membership in the educated elige and gotcha! material for pedants and know-it-alls."

harper
2001-12-27, 07:47 PM
Gee...I was hoping this embarassing thread had died and here Rebecca, a linguist who knows that of which she speaks, has ressurected it to haunt me. I think I'll change my screen name to Elitist Bonehead. What if Kevin takes away my FORA link? How will I get to the data (datums)?

jagur
2001-12-27, 08:17 PM
its all GEEK to me

Klaas Bil
2001-12-27, 10:42 PM
Rebecca,

As you were the most fanatical, if not frantical, teacher in this
thread, are you now accusing yourself of being a "wisenose" (literally
translated Dutch)? Oh well, I think you're right, seeing what you read
over the Xmas holiday.

Klaas Bil

On Thu, 27 Dec 2001 19:45:09 +0000 (UTC), rebecca
<forum.member@unicyclist.com> wrote:

>I'm reading Words and Rules by Steven Pinker and encountered this
>passage:
>
(snip)
>Latin- and Greek-inspired plurals (...) are shibboleths of membership in
>the educated elige and gotcha! material for pedants and know-it-alls."
>
>
>
>
>--
>rebecca Posted via the Unicyclist Community -
>http://unicyclist.com/forums

--
"To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:" "Kalifaatstaat, FLAME, PCMT"

rebecca
2001-12-28, 02:12 AM
sorry abt the fanaticism...i'm fascinated in linguistics...this passage really caught my attention bc of the recent discussions with people overgeneralizing rules **cough** FORA! **cough**
it's funny that people overgeneralize and use *wrong* endings to sound intelligent. (admittedly, i've probably done it too)

and please don't criticize me for my choice of reading material

rhysling
2001-12-28, 02:47 AM
Quickly my friends: the beast has revealed the soft underbelly of it's literary preferances!!- bring the hot irons!! 'Tis our moment! Strike... strike now!

Christopher

Klaas Bil
2001-12-29, 01:50 AM
You're welcome. When? Contact me on my email.

Klaas

On Fri, 28 Dec 2001 05:53:35 GMT, John Zanetti
<gianniz80@yahoo.com> wrote:

>
> My mother's side of the family is Dutch. I'm going to go to the
> Netherlands and ride unis with you, Bil.
>
>John
>
>
>
>Klaas Bil wrote:
>
>> Rebecca,
>>
>> As you were the most fanatical, if not frantical, teacher in this
>> thread, are you now accusing yourself of being a "wisenose" (literally
>> translated Dutch)? Oh well, I think you're right, seeing what you read
>> over the Xmas holiday.
>

--
"To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:" "POORTSCAN, HAHO, remailers"

Klaas Bil
2001-12-29, 01:50 AM
You're welcome. When? Contact me on my email.

Klaas

On Fri, 28 Dec 2001 05:53:35 GMT, John Zanetti
<gianniz80@yahoo.com> wrote:

>
> My mother's side of the family is Dutch. I'm going to go to the
> Netherlands and ride unis with you, Bil.
>
>John
>
>
>
>Klaas Bil wrote:
>
>> Rebecca,
>>
>> As you were the most fanatical, if not frantical, teacher in this
>> thread, are you now accusing yourself of being a "wisenose" (literally
>> translated Dutch)? Oh well, I think you're right, seeing what you read
>> over the Xmas holiday.
>

--
"To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:" "POORTSCAN, HAHO, remailers"

Klaas Bil
2001-12-29, 02:01 AM
Hey Rebecca,

I forgot the :-) No harm intended. I just thought there was a funny
disconnect between what you (seemingly?) wanted to convey and what you
quoted. Linguistics is one of my interests too though grouped under
"lesser" ones. Oh and I think "fora" and such often aren't meant to sound
intelligent as much as just playful.

Klaas Bil

On Fri, 28 Dec 2001 02:15:10 +0000 (UTC), rebecca
<forum.member@unicyclist.com> wrote:

>sorry abt the fanaticism...i'm fascinated in linguistics...this passage
>really caught my attention bc of the recent discussions with people
>overgeneralizing rules **cough** FORA! **cough** it's funny that people
>overgeneralize and use *wrong* endings to sound intelligent. (admittedly,
>i've probably done it too)
>
>and please don't criticize me for my choice of reading material
>
>
>
>
>--
>rebecca Posted via the Unicyclist Community -
>http://unicyclist.com/forums

--
"To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:" "POORTSCAN, HAHO, remailers"

J Smole
2001-12-30, 05:39 AM
Off Topic:

Have you read Pinkers other books "the Language instinct" and "How the
mind works"? His books have altered the way I think - I rationalize and
try to explain every behavior, including seemingly religious actions.

rebecca <forum.member@unicyclist.com> wrote in message
news:<a0gkje$qqm$1@laurel.tc.umn.edu>...
> sorry abt the fanaticism...i'm fascinated in linguistics...this passage
> really caught my attention bc of the recent discussions with people
> overgeneralizing rules **cough** FORA! **cough** it's funny that people
> overgeneralize and use *wrong* endings to sound intelligent.
> (admittedly, i've probably done it too)
>
> and please don't criticize me for my choice of reading material

rebecca
2001-12-31, 05:26 AM
Originally posted by J Smole
Off Topic:

Have you read Pinkers other books "the Language instinct" and "How the
mind works"? His books have altered the way I think - I rationalize and
try to explain every behavior, including seemingly religious actions.


yeah, i read the language instinct for the linguistics class i took two summers ago...Loved it! that's what really started to get me interested in linguistics. never heard of the other one though... i'll have to find it

rebecca
2002-01-03, 01:52 AM
Has anyone else read Pinker? Gilby, notice I am using complete sentences.

harper
2002-01-03, 02:00 AM
No, but I have read Daniel Pinkwater's "Guys from Space" which is the best pre-school level story ever.

I like your bouncing, caffeine saturated avatar. Math Goddess? What's your favorite irrational number? Everytime both my kids and my wife and I are all prime numbers (age wise) I make a big deal out of it and they don't understand. The best was when we were all binary...Zach was 4, Sarah was 8, Karen and I were 32. Our ages were the product of their ages. They really hated that. Go figure.

Also, neccessarily, the sum of the base 2 logs of their ages was equal to the base 2 log of our ages. Those were all integers.

tel
2002-01-03, 02:19 AM
while we are at the subject of irrational numbers, I would have to say that the best irrational number would be pie, or 3.1415926535898 try memorizing that, a close second, would be sqrt of 2 or 1.414. We are already off topic from unicycling, so lets play name that tune, rebecca should know this one "I like my sugar with coffee and cream"

Doug Massey
2002-01-03, 03:32 AM
Pi is not only irrational, but since it can't even be a root of an
algebraic equation, it is a transcendental number.

And you thought that only unicycling was transcendental.

Doug

"tel" <forum.member@unicyclist.com> wrote in message
news:a10fe4$an6$1@laurel.tc.umn.edu...
> while we are at the subject of irrational numbers, I would have to say
> that the best irrational number would be pie, or 3.1415926535898 try
> memorizing that, a close second, would be sqrt of 2 or 1.414. We are
> already off topic from unicycling, so lets play name that tune, rebecca
> should know this one "I like my sugar with coffee and cream"
>
>
>
>
> --
> tel Posted via the Unicyclist Community - http://unicyclist.com/forums

harper
2002-01-03, 03:34 AM
Euler's number, e, 2.718281828..

tel
2002-01-03, 03:43 AM
the sqrt of -1 of i, not even a number. How did we get this far off topic anyway

rebecca
2002-01-03, 03:47 AM
tel, pie is not an irrational number; pi is. i'd have to pick pi or e for my favorite irrational number. My favorite equation is 1+e^(i*pi)=0. Math goddess is a nickname given to me by some other people from my school's math team. (the other cocaptain is *surprise!* math god). coffee is from my caffeine addiction, which is much worse now that i'm back in school (didn't drink at all over break). harper, what is guys from space? i like your age thing...i notice stuff liek that too. a few yrs ago they put up a board in the front of my church to put up the numbers of the hymns, and the first thing that came to my mind was "the sum of the first two hymns is the third one." and tel, yes, i is a number...imaginary numbers are fully accepted as actual numbers...ever heard of quaternaries? my friend mentioned those once (some system w 4 different values for (-1)^.5, but i don't knoww mucyh abt them..wnt to find out more when i have time.

harper
2002-01-03, 03:48 AM
It's a number...just named an imaginary number. Now, put them all together and you get:

e^(i*pi)=-1

All those cool numbers together in a sentence.

"Guys from Space" is a pre-school level book written by Danial Pinkwater. It's one of the funniest things I've ever read.

I think there are only two values for root(-1), (-i,i).

tel
2002-01-03, 03:53 AM
im only in highschool calc. so im going to quit this conversation right now while i still have my dignigy (opps maybe too late for that). I dont know math, I know computers, (computers that can do math, Im a programmer, ill just write a program to do the math problems.

Maxfield D
2002-01-03, 04:49 AM
Enough of this math stuff!!? My parents are both mathemagicians, so I had
to become a psychologist. Anyone want to talk about rats, perverts, or
sophomores?

Just ride,

David Maxfield Bainbridge Island, WA

rebecca
2002-01-03, 05:00 AM
Quaternions are a different branch of math that theorizes that you COULD have more than one type of imaginary number. Something in four dimensions. Vector stuff. But i don't know enough abt this to say more. This seems to explain it pretty well.
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/ma/gallery/quat/intro.html#extend (http://)
There's also stuff at quaternions.com, but taht seems to be based more on the physical applicatons than on the mathematics itself.

Tel, this discussion has NOTHING to do with calc. Except that Euler may have used calc to come up w that equation. i don't understand the mathematics behind it yet, hope to learn more aobut it soon. have you heard of usaco (a programming thing)?

I'm being yelled at now to go to bed by overbearing parents. Good night.

John Childs
2002-01-03, 06:13 AM
Ohhh... Quaternions are cool. They make some manipulations in computer
graphics easier and faster. I wrote a Rubiks Cube simulator that uses
quaternions to do the spaceball type rotations of the cube. The progie is
at http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/jchilds/ Quaternions are also
handy for those third person flying camera views in 3D games. Fun stuff to
play with.

And Tel, don't think that you can get away with always letting the
computer do the math for you. If you want to do computer science you're
going to have to learn some math. So learn to enjoy it. :)

Anyone else like to solve a Rubiks Cube while riding a unicycle? (I can't
juggle while riding so I resort to playing with the cube.)

john_childs

>From: rebecca <forum.member@unicyclist.com> Quaternions are a different
>branch of math that theorizes that you COULD have more than one type of
>imaginary number. Something in four dimensions. Vector stuff. But i don't
>know enough abt this to say more.
[snip]

_________________________________________________________________
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AccordNSX
2002-01-03, 09:35 AM
I've got a nice cologne called Pi.

tel
2002-01-03, 11:41 AM
Originally posted by rebecca
Have you heard of usaco (a programming thing)?



No, Ive never hered of usaco, but I would like to find out what it is, I know C, C++, BASIC, and HTML, im working on learning JAVA, or maybe I will try to learn PASCAL.

Jeff Lutkus
2002-01-03, 02:49 PM
You should learn some of the fun languages. Lisp, ML, ProLog, FORTRAN. Ok,
maybe not fortran so much as the others. Some of the things you can do
with these will change the way you think.

> No, Ive never hered of usaco, but I would like to find out what it is, I
> know C, C++, BASIC, and HTML, im working on learning JAVA, or maybe I
> will try to learn PASCAL.

Sent via the Unicyclist Community - http://Unicyclist.com (http://unicyclist.com/)

Chilliwack
2002-01-03, 05:46 PM
>so lets play name that tune, rebecca should know this one
>"I like my sugar with coffee and cream"

Beastie Boys
Super Disco Breakin'

Caleb Penner
Unrelated Link (http://homepage.mac.com/cpenner/)

tel
2002-01-03, 09:02 PM
Originally posted by Chilliwack
Beastie Boys
Super Disco Breakin'


Beastie boys is correct, but the song is Intergalactic

harper
2002-01-03, 09:23 PM
As Gilby mentioned, we should let this thread quietly die. He was kind enough to start up another one in the "Just Conversation" forum where these topics are more appropriate.

Hopefully the link won't wrap around.

http://www.unicyclist.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&postid=45398#post45398

Klaas Bil
2002-01-04, 12:36 AM
On Wed, 02 Jan 2002 22:13:31 -0800, "John Childs"
<john_childs@hotmail.com> wrote:

>Anyone else like to solve a Rubiks Cube while riding a unicycle? (I can't
>juggle while riding so I resort to playing with the cube.)
Still? Twenty years ago I could do the cube without thinking (but not
without looking) but could not ride a unicycle. Now it's the other way
around. So give me a 20-year wormhole and I'll join you.

Klaas Bil
--
"To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:" "WANK, David Koresh, Stephanie"

tel
2002-01-04, 01:10 AM
Twenty years ago I could do the cube without thinking

I could never do the rubics cube, so I gave up, took all the stickers off, and put them back on so the cube would be complete, its much easier that way, maybe you could do that on a unicylce

rebecca
2002-01-04, 02:30 AM
usaco is a programming contest..i've never done it bc my school is HORRIBLE and has a really bad compsci dept (most ppl only take compsci bc they need a tech ed credit or just want an easy class), but my friend participates in it and does really well.

http://www.uwp.edu/academic/mathematics/usaco/

Gilby, is there any way you can move this whole thing to the other page?

sorry for the unusually short post, i've gotten total in the last two days half teh amount of sleep i got in one day over break. whoever said senior year is so great was high on somehitng. or was an idiot. likely both.

dangerdale
2002-01-21, 12:38 PM
when im unicycling to the beastie boys i find it more fun colour in the each side of my rubics cube with a diferent colour

HandyAndy
2004-04-20, 09:26 PM
Originally posted by John Childs
Ohhh... Quaternions are cool. They make some manipulations in computer
graphics easier and faster. I wrote a Rubiks Cube simulator that uses
quaternions to do the spaceball type rotations of the cube. The progie is
at http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/jchilds/ Quaternions are also
handy for those third person flying camera views in 3D games. Fun stuff to
play with.

And Tel, don't think that you can get away with always letting the
computer do the math for you. If you want to do computer science you're
going to have to learn some math. So learn to enjoy it. :)

Anyone else like to solve a Rubiks Cube while riding a unicycle? (I can't
juggle while riding so I resort to playing with the cube.)

john_childs

>From: rebecca <forum.member@unicyclist.com> Quaternions are a different
>branch of math that theorizes that you COULD have more than one type of
>imaginary number. Something in four dimensions. Vector stuff. But i don't
>know enough abt this to say more.
[snip]

_________________________________________________________________
Chat with friends online, try MSN Messenger: http://messenger.msn.com (http://messenger.msn.com/)


this one's for you Potter

James_Potter
2004-04-21, 03:57 PM
WHOOO
danke schoen, AndyAndy!

I solve a Rubiks Cube one handed, while idling one footed.