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Idling is hard

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  • #16
    Maybe I'll do one of those "minute by minute" videos that's so popular (?) on norwegian telvision: "Riding very very slowly for a few miles - minute by minute"
    UniMyra's YouTube channel

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    • #17
      A "little bit" each time you ride...

      Stop doing your normal 3 o'clock & 9 o'clock free mounting.

      START doing Half-idle free mount. Give it at least 5-10 attempts each time you go riding. This is your "intro" to idling...if you care to learn.

      That's how I did it and that was my "attitude" when I was learning(failing/over/over again...). Actually, I just could not do the 3/9 traditional free mount. This included falling on my face a few times from "pressure" on the back pedal...it kicked out and shot out behind me. Then I hurled my stupid unicycle about 20ft into the sky..olympic hammer toss style...you know spinning...then screaming...with bloody knees and broken teeth.
      Actually, I can do it now. The reason why? Learning to idle taught me superior balance/control, so I can finally do the damn 3/9 o'clock (Egg squasher) free mount.
      Last edited by slamdance; 2020-02-11, 06:20 AM. Reason: .

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      • #18
        Originally posted by slamdance View Post
        Stop doing your normal 3 o'clock & 9 o'clock free mounting.

        START doing Half-idle free mount. Give it at least 5-10 attempts each time you go riding. This is your "intro" to idling...if you care to learn.

        That's how I did it and that was my "attitude" when I was learning(failing/over/over again...). Actually, I just could not do the 3/9 traditional free mount. This included falling on my face a few times from "pressure" on the back pedal...it kicked out and shot out behind me. Then I hurled my stupid unicycle about 20ft into the sky..olympic hammer toss style...you know spinning...then screaming...with bloody knees and broken teeth.
        Actually, I can do it now. The reason why? Learning to idle taught me superior balance/control, so I can finally do the damn 3/9 o'clock (Egg squasher) free mount.
        I could of course practice roll back mount (maybe I will), but it's not usefull for my regular riding. I'm either on a 36" or I'm at at a place where thers's usually not enough space to do the roll back.

        I've not improved a lot, but I've had a few attempts where I'm actually in control for a few seconds. I have a long way to go, but it doesn't feel completely hopeless like it did before. The key to my better attempts is the start. If bodypositon, speed and maybe some other factors are perfect when I start on the first idle, I have a shot. So far I need a little luck for this to happen.

        What seems to be working for me so far of all the advice I got (thanks!) are these two:
        Originally posted by UniMyra View Post
        -As you get to the end of one stroke, allow yourself to pause for a moment and feel which direction your weight is falling, then respond accordingly.
        -Straight posture.Keep your head, shoulders, and hips stacked. Think of your chest being pulled up and ever so slightly out when you ride.
        UniMyra's YouTube channel

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        • #19
          Hey Unimyra. I've come across your video's quite often and you definitely have excellent ability to balance and stall.
          I can clearly see that you have both "seat balance" and "pedal balancing" abilities.
          So, I can't quite understand why you haven't mastered idling already.
          My theory is that you are "doing more work" than required.

          Here's a suggestion that may not make sense right now, but what the heck you've tried it all. Give it a try.
          Instead of practicing the standard idle, you should do just the a one foot idle.
          Grab onto something or go into a door way, and with only the "down foot" and hip/core strength start practicing.
          I suspect people having trouble with idling are using too much "top foot".
          Not just to move pedal back/forth, but also to add weight on that pedal.
          Doing one foot idling obviously take's that out, and forces you "back to" the bottom pedal foot.

          When I started idling: I would put tremendous weight on bottom foot, and shuffle the top foot with no weight on it.
          Then later when I mastered idling: It was the opposite. I was much lighter on bottom foot, and controlled everything with my top foot.
          So, I think if you "try" to control everything with your top foot as a beginner, you will absolutely never get it...except for a few circus freak ultimate wheel riders.

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