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Tutorial on how to fremount a 24" and a 36" unicycle

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  • #31
    Hello UM. I notice in the video when you're mounting the 36er that your left pedal is very high as you step up. Just be careful that you don't tear your calf muscle. I would recommend having the left pedal much lower i.e., at four o clock as you step on . The higher the step the more pressure is put on the calf muscle.
    Last edited by unibokk; 2014-08-27, 08:39 PM.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by unibokk View Post
      Hello UM. I notice in the video when you're mounting the 36er that your left pedal is very high as you step up. Just be careful that you don't tear your calf muscle. I would recommend having the left pedal much lower i.e., at four o clock as you step on . The higher the step the more pressure is put on the calf muscle.
      I hurt my calf muscle two weeks ago while doing an assisted mount! My first foot must have been too high? I had been riding for an hour in class then went to the local meet up. Just as I mounted I felt a really sharp pain in my calf. I barely made it back to my car and couldn't walk the next day without severe pain. Took just over a week to walk without a limp. Tennis players call it Tennis calf and runners call it a calf heart attack.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by unibokk View Post
        Hello UM. I notice in the video when you're mounting the 36er that your left pedal is very high as you step up. Just be careful that you don't tear your calf muscle. I would recommend having the left pedal much lower i.e., at four o clock as you step on . The higher the step the more pressure is put on the calf muscle.
        Do you mean my right calf? The one i kick off on. I don't think there is very much pressure on my left calf.

        The higher my left pedal is, the more force I can put on that and less on my right calf.

        I've never had any problems with this and I have done this type of mount a lot over the last 3-4 years.

        But of course, when you mount a 36'er anything can happen including hitting a fence or a curious boy who is standing too close (the boy is fine).
        Last edited by UniMyra; 2014-08-28, 01:34 PM.
        UniMyra's YouTube channel

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Vertigo View Post
          I hurt my calf muscle two weeks ago while doing an assisted mount! My first foot must have been too high? I had been riding for an hour in class then went to the local meet up. Just as I mounted I felt a really sharp pain in my calf. I barely made it back to my car and couldn't walk the next day without severe pain. Took just over a week to walk without a limp. Tennis players call it Tennis calf and runners call it a calf heart attack.
          Hello Vertigo, I hope your calf heals up ok. When stepping up, I would suggest that you place the centre of your foot on the pedal and not the ball of your foot. Pressing down on the ball of your foot puts more pressure on the calf muscle. You would have noticed this as you tried to walk after hurting your calf.

          In the video UniMyra's foot position looks to be very well positioned which means that his calf muscle is more relaxed and not so tight as he mounts.

          It's just the height of the left pedal as he mounts the 36er, is very high.

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          • #35
            I've had my 36er for a couple of years now and after watching the video I decided to give that technique a try. Up until now I would mount the uni in a somewhat similar fashion, except that my "starting" pedal would be in a much lower position than what you see in the video. I also never thought of putting pressure on the pedal and seat the way that is described there.

            After trying that out, I must confess that it is definitely superior to what I was doing, which resulted in more successful and easier mounts for me.

            Thank you for posting.
            Last edited by gathan; 2014-08-28, 04:21 PM.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by UniMyra View Post
              Do you mean my right calf? The one i kick off on. I don't think there is very much pressure on my left calf.

              The higher my left pedal is, the more force I can put on that and less on my right calf.

              I've never had any problems with this and I have done this type of mount a lot over the last 3-4 years.

              But of course, when you mount a 36'er anything can happen including hitting a fence or a curious boy who is standing too close (the boy is fine).

              Hello UniMmyra, firstly let me say that I really enjoyed the video, it's very well made. Yes it was the left calf I was concerned about, but after watching your video a few more times I noticed that your left calf muscle looks quite relaxed.

              Your left foot position on the pedal looks to be very accurate so that that there isn't too much pull on your calf. I think your height [about 186.69cm?] helps. It means that you can more easily get your whole foot over the pedal.

              With the 36er pedal so high a smaller person might only be able to get the ball part of their foot onto the pedal causing the calf muscle to pull as the they step up. Also because the step up is higher for a smaller person they will find it more difficult to get the required trust from the right leg adding pressure to the left calf as the left leg tries to compensate for the lack of thrust generated by the right leg.

              Having said all that, I know that you cant always cover every possible scenario that may arise when doing a tutorial. Ultimately it's up to each individual to decide what works best for themselves.

              The roll into the fence added a nice bit of humour. lol!
              Last edited by unibokk; 2014-08-28, 04:45 PM.

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              • #37
                Thanks unibokk and gathan. I see your point about height unibokk. I have to admit that I didn't think about that.
                UniMyra's YouTube channel

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                • #38
                  Great freemount tutorial!

                  This is a great tutorial and a great freemount. It really works. I've been freemounting for a while, but have never been able to keep the wheel/pedals static. But I tried this and I can now. It really does work! The bit I found most helpful was "think of a pole vault jumper". Thanks, UniMyra!

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                  • #39
                    Free mounting problems

                    I've been having trouble free mounting for the last month.

                    I've watched the videos in this thread and most of Terry the Unigezzers tutorials.

                    I am on the short side at 5ft6'' or (1650mm) and have only had the 36 " Nimbus Impulse for around 2 months. I have had previous experience of riding a 20" for several years, but free mounting and even getting some distance on the 36 is proving quite a test,
                    Upon reading through this post and having tried several of the techniques, I think I've cracked it then at the next practise I seem to have gone even further back having more difficulties
                    Currently my best attempts come from starting in a set position of cranks at horizontal, with the left crank nearest to the left leg...I then push the uni forward and start off on the right foot, counting 1,2,3. So the one is the right foot, the two is the left foot, the three is the right foot....then while watching the left crank just start to make it's journey from dead bottom, I launch my left foot to the left crank, push down on the seat with the left hand, and try and hit the seat with momentum, also I swing the right hand forward. So many things to get in unison and in perfect balance.

                    I think it is essential to have the uni in perfect balance (left hand on the seat hold) as I push it forward, in windy conditions its better either to go with the wind or straight into it.
                    What is the perfect height for the saddle and how is this set up for the person?

                    I seem to have trouble steering and staying on for more than 200yards, could this be because the seat is too high?
                    If I stand on the pedals (which are 150mm cranks) with them horizontal I have about 100mm clearance to the middle of the seat

                    When riding the 20" it's very easy just to swing the hips and retain balance, but on the 36 uni i I find its mostly arms, and if I get a little of balance, it's a struggle to get back on track.

                    Any help guys.....I do have the kneepads and the wrist protector gloves, inspite of these I came off a couple of weeks ago landing on my tail bone getting an electric sort of shock in both hips and have been careful (as much as one can on a Uni) since then.

                    Cheers from New Zealand
                    Jimu
                    Cheers & Ciao,

                    Kokopelli alias (Jimu)

                    "Together We Create Beauty"

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Kokopelli View Post
                      I seem to have trouble steering and staying on for more than 200yards, could this be because the seat is too high?
                      If I stand on the pedals (which are 150mm cranks) with them horizontal I have about 100mm clearance to the middle of the seat
                      The general advice is that when you meassure seat height, you should have the knee almost straight with your heel on the bottom pedal. I adjust my seat a bit lower, so that I can comfortably stand on the pedals out of the seat for uphill riding.

                      When you practice free mounting, it is easier to have the seat lower than you normally would. There are several threads on this topic you can read.
                      UniMyra's YouTube channel

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                      • #41
                        Thanks UniMyra,

                        Progress is slow, but definitely getting better, the measured set approach is working now though about one clean mount in five, sometimes I do four in arrow then miss five.
                        Slow and steady wins the race!
                        Cheers & Ciao,

                        Kokopelli alias (Jimu)

                        "Together We Create Beauty"

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