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  • #31
    Hi aracer
    I freemount in second cos that's the only gear I'm really interested in.
    I've got 125/150' cranks and I'm using the 150 peg at the moment as that gives me the most leverage to go forwards.
    I might try the 125 peg at some point but at the moment I'm staying with the 150s.
    I forgot to mention in my last post that I did a lot of bails because I was going too fast and it was scary. I'm hoping that I'll get used to the high speeds. Also made an error with my shoe size, I've got size 6s.
    I've got spirit cranks. If ever I do progress to shifting on the fly I think I'll have to change for moments.

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    • #32
      I think the main thing is to just have fun with your Schlumpf hub and not make it out to be something harder than it is. A bit of practice and you'll be shifting back and forth no worries.

      Use whatever technique works best for you - it's not like there is a rule book. Here's a video I made a while back of my CRAP Schlumpf technique

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XZ0oUpSkGrc
      Last edited by digitalhippie; 2014-10-25, 02:10 AM.

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      • #33
        Hi digitalhippie

        I think you've hit the nail on the head !
        It's meant to be fun !
        That's where I'm going wrong. I think I'm trying too hard because I so want to be able to do this. I'm not enjoying it at all.
        I need to chill

        I've watched your video a few times. It's very good !

        Cheers

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        • #34
          Really worth learning how to change gear, and using a crank length which lets you do that IMHO - why make starting so much more difficult for yourself? Also, surely you're not going to be riding on the flat all the time. That and being able to change gear when you want is part of the challenge and what makes riding one fun.

          I have to admit that at times I'm struggling to find riding my Schlumpf fun, which is probably one of the reasons I'm not progressing very fast. A lot of the time it just seems like a lot of hard work and not much progress, and it does also scare me as I'm typically averaging 13mph+ and peaking at over 16mph, which is faster than I can run, so any bail is going to result in hitting the ground.

          I've come to realise that riding a Schlumpf is like starting all over again riding a uni in terms of the amount of learning involved, and so requires similar levels of dedication. Hence today is the third day in a row I've been out on it, which I think is the first time I've ever managed that. Most importantly I have no knee pain after that - given it was a guni ride just before I first had a problem with my knee back in March, following which I didn't ride it at all for 4 or 5 months (I've also barely done any muni this summer and still haven't run since March), that is a pretty big thing, and a real sign of progress.

          Only a short session today before a muni ride, but it's still keeping on training those neurons. Am doing a combination of riding in high and practicing changing gear - thought I was OK with the latter, but realised that I'm a long way from being able to change on demand. Also, whilst I'm doing some speed runs pushing myself I'm doing a lot of riding at slower speeds just trying to get the feeling, and it's possible that I am now making progress.
          Last edited by aracer; 2014-10-26, 10:57 PM.
          Unicycling: great for your thighs.

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          • #35
            I think you're right, aracer. For me, it's been just about like staring over. But it's rewarding, too -- like yesterday when I was able to keep up with a couple of bicycle riders on the bike path who were riding at a pretty good clip. They were impressed! But like you say, I got nervous after a while and slowed down again. Maybe over time I'll get used to the speed and be able to keep it up.
            Alucard, have you tried the ankle-shift method? If not, I recommend giving it a try. May not work for everyone, but it was a game-changer for me!
            As aracer also suggests, I spend many lunchtimes riding around the parking lot at work, just up-shifting and down-shifting. It takes a lot of them to get good at it (at least for me it does).
            Good luck!
            "I'm a unicyclist. I make my own reality."

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            • #36
              A very good ride today. Rode from home, which is the first time in a long time I've done that on the Schlumpf. Riding from home involves going down a fairly big hill, quite a bit of tight, twisty or narrow stuff and back up the hill to finish (I'd need to be a lot, lot fitter to ride the last uphill in high). Fast easy riding interspersed with more tricky stuff, hence lots of gear changes required and lots of bits which can be done in high but are a lot harder. Recently I've just been riding flat easy stuff where I can stay in high and it's not too challenging, so this was quite a step up.

              It went really well. Not only was it feeling more comfortable riding in high on the easier stuff, I also found I'm getting a lot more competent at staying in high when it gets more tricky. Best of all was that my gear changing has improved a huge amount, which meant I could be in the right gear more. Still need to work on my downshifting which isn't working first time every time, though I only completely missed one of those. Hit every single upshift first time though!

              So to come back to the discussion above, it's such fun when you can change gear at will and just pop into high for a short stretch then back down to low when you need it again shortly.
              Unicycling: great for your thighs.

              Comment


              • #37
                Good going, aracer!
                I had a nice (although somewhat short, due to time constraints) ride yesterday. I did have one UPD where I got a little ahead of myself and went "over the falls." Fortunately I ran it out, but those are the times that make me leery of keeping up a fast pace for very long. I don't like to ride faster than I can run. (And I'm not a very fast runner, unfortunately.)
                Do you have UPDs of that particular nature? Any tips for avoiding them?
                "I'm a unicyclist. I make my own reality."

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by LanceB View Post
                  Do you have UPDs of that particular nature? Any tips for avoiding them?
                  Yes I sometimes have upd's that I can't run out. If those happen, I have to roll it out - mostly it works.

                  How to avoid? I've asked several seasoned fast riders how they dare to ride faster than they can run. The answer is "don't fall". Not sure if that helps, I don't think it helped me really, but that was sincerely their view.

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                  • #39
                    I've had a few of those, but none at all recently. I think it's another of those things which just comes with saddle time - I mean most normal people are incredulous that we can ride unis at all, bear that in mind when you're incredulous about people riding Schlumpfs. Certainly with all the time I've been getting on mine recently, my confidence has increased a huge amount - today I was riding at speed (13mph+) on a bumpy path I've never dared to pick the pace up on before for fear of falling forwards. Not something I was particularly planning on doing, it just happened.

                    One thing which has helped a lot has been the decision to back off a bit and not ride everywhere as fast as possible - it certainly helps a lot when you've got something in reserve so that you know you can accelerate out of a slight forwards fall. I'm mostly just trying to turn the pedals over at a comfortable pace which is still fast but not flat out.

                    I'm actually surprised by the amount of progress I'm making at the moment with a concerted effort to learn - far quicker improvement than I managed previously. The last couple of rides I've also been pretty much shifting at will, including a couple of times when I hadn't planned to shift but just did it when I needed.
                    Last edited by aracer; 2014-11-10, 09:49 AM.
                    Unicycling: great for your thighs.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Long time since posting here, just felt like posting an update.

                      I have multiple-drilled cranks on my G32 -- 110/130/150. While I've always felt most comfortable on the 130 setting for regular riding, I've left it mostly on the 150 spot for about the past year, because that was the only place I could ride geared up with any confidence. A week ago I decided the time had come to step up and move to the 130 setting, and just get used to it in high gear. I won't say it's like starting over, but it's been another whole learning cycle. Riding in 1:1 is much more pleasant, but overdrive is hard. I have that tentative feeling again (like when I first started), and UPD at random times when I get a little ahead or behind my balance point. Still, I've been practicing at noon, and it's getting better. I told myself a year ago that I wanted to be riding overdrive in the 130 position in a year, so it's good to be finally doing it!

                      So, how's everybody else doing these days?
                      "I'm a unicyclist. I make my own reality."

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        I have my name on a waiting list for a schlumph. I gotta say that following this thread makes me a little uncertain about following through.
                        Has anyone heard when they might be available?
                        Reid

                        20 inch Qu-Ax
                        26 inch Yuni
                        26 inch Flansberrium with 4.7 inch tire
                        Two 36 inch Nimbus titans, one for home (Ca) and one for work (Alaska)

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                        • #42
                          You can buy Killian's right now, look on the Trading Post. Great price on a low-mileage unit.

                          It's true, Schlumpfs aren't for everyone, and it isn't like you just jump on and ride away like a multi-speed bike. There's a learning curve. Some people take to it right away, others (like me) take longer. (A lot longer.) Still, while I'm a long way from "mastering" it, I enjoy the challenge, and the potential is tremendous. (That's the thing about unicycling in general, isn't it? The challenge?)
                          Keep in mind, there's no free speed. Everything is a trade-off. Riding in high gear is kind of like riding slightly uphill all the time (unless you happen to be going downhill).
                          Anyway, you won't know if you like it until you try. And even then, you won't know for a while. But I recommend giving it a shot. You can always sell it again if you end up not liking it.

                          Cheers!
                          "I'm a unicyclist. I make my own reality."

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Reid View Post
                            Has anyone heard when they might be available?
                            Florian says "Late Summer". But many people say, in Switzerland, there's only winter, spring and winter again
                            Einradfahren in Sachsen:
                            einradsachsen.com
                            f/EinradSachsen
                            07.06.2020: Europamarathon

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                            • #44
                              (That's the thing about unicycling in general, isn't it? The challenge?)


                              I definitely agree. Which is why I'm not ready to buy one yet. At this point in my new hobby challenges abound. As I learn by both research and practise I do speculate on what challenges I might want to tackle next. Going from a small wheel to a larger one was a pretty obvious next step. I'm currently concentrating on uphills and downhills.
                              I'm looking forward to experiencing both a schlumph and a fatty. After my studies I'm thinking the schlumph would be more appropriate further down the line then the fatty as it would seem to require more experience to be successful(and enjoyable). Makes sense?
                              One thing I keep wondering about the 'schulmph experience' is tire size. I have no desire to go faster then I can outrun a upd. Generally speaking my 36er fits this requirement. That would suggest a 24 inch guni. I get the impression however that even riders who have a similar top speed 'limit' frequently ride bigger wheels. I'm curious as to why?

                              A side note-in addition to the challenge of unicycling I also find it good exercise and fun. And since it is fun I exercise. Something I normally find difficult.
                              Reid

                              20 inch Qu-Ax
                              26 inch Yuni
                              26 inch Flansberrium with 4.7 inch tire
                              Two 36 inch Nimbus titans, one for home (Ca) and one for work (Alaska)

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Reid View Post
                                (That's the thing about unicycling in general, isn't it? The challenge?)


                                I definitely agree. Which is why I'm not ready to buy one yet. At this point in my new hobby challenges abound. As I learn by both research and practise I do speculate on what challenges I might want to tackle next. Going from a small wheel to a larger one was a pretty obvious next step. I'm currently concentrating on uphills and downhills.
                                I'm looking forward to experiencing both a schlumph and a fatty. After my studies I'm thinking the schlumph would be more appropriate further down the line then the fatty as it would seem to require more experience to be successful(and enjoyable). Makes sense?
                                One thing I keep wondering about the 'schulmph experience' is tire size. I have no desire to go faster then I can outrun a upd. Generally speaking my 36er fits this requirement. That would suggest a 24 inch guni. I get the impression however that even riders who have a similar top speed 'limit' frequently ride bigger wheels. I'm curious as to why?

                                A side note-in addition to the challenge of unicycling I also find it good exercise and fun. And since it is fun I exercise. Something I normally find difficult.
                                I have a 29" Schlumpf which you're welcome to ride if we manage to get together. I had it out at unicycle basketball practice on Tuesday and a couple people gave it a try. A geared unicycle doesn't have to be all about speed. It can be about cruising and going longer distances with less effort.

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