Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

26" CromMo Nimbus vs. 26" Oracle vs. KH26

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • unihewett
    replied
    oracle 26"

    i recommend orecle 26" i just installed 138s cranks, i love the way it moves!





    Last edited by unihewett; 2015-12-01, 02:11 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • unihewett
    replied
    Originally posted by uniShark View Post
    Although I now use 165's on my KH29, I agree that spec'ing them with the dual hole 150's is appropriate. When I first got my 29er, I was using it more on road with very light xc muni, which I think mirrors more what most people use their 29ers for. The 125/150 Moments were perfect for me for a long time, and I would not have wanted longer cranks at the time. I moved to 165 because I stopped using the 29 on road once I got a 36, I don't mind going slower, esp. when riding with my son on his 24", and I find they help me with climbing more technical trails. My long legs may factor into my preference, but it's hard to say because I've never ridden with shorter legs.
    how old is your son and what unycicle did you get him?

    Leave a comment:


  • kahunacohen
    replied
    So I ended up getting a used pair of 127/150 moment cranks for the 29er and tried them today on moderate muni. I like them a lot better. I actually climb better with the shorter cranks, since it allows me to keep my momentum up, at least on the type of riding I've been doing (which granted is not crazy stuff).

    Leave a comment:


  • kahunacohen
    replied
    No doubt people might prefer 165s. As a lot of people say it's personal preference, and I am certainly no muni expert, nor am I great at it. I've only been doing muni for a few months, and it's a different skill than other types of unicycling.

    All I know is what I feel. I've tried both, and I find the 150s more fun for the trails I am doing. I actually don't have 150s, but I rode another person's KH29 with 150s. I also have heard body-types have an influence over crank preference. I am glad I got the 165s with the uni, because you never know until you try.

    BTW, I have this up on the trading post, but not getting much response. If anybody has a pair of Dual Hole 150s they want to sell, I am game. Please respond to me on the trading post.
    Last edited by kahunacohen; 2012-11-13, 01:30 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nurse Ben
    replied
    I still ride 165's on my 29er for technical muni, 150's just aren't long enough for steep climbs. Don't forget that long cranks also provide more control on the downs and on tech features. Most folks don't ride a 29er on tech muni, so 150's or even shorter probably work fine for the majority of people, but for "real muni" as one poster likes to call it, long cranks on big wheels are necessary to reduce hiking.

    When I rode Moab with Unishark and later went to the Cali Munifest, I rode my 29er with 165's, it was a good choice, I was able to ride most everything without hopping.

    As to a smaller wheel, they work fine for small obstacle rolling, but they don't roll big stuff well, esp uphills, so this is why those riders tend to hop and jump.

    Try a 36er off road and roll the same terrain as you have on a smaller wheel and you'll be amazed at how much better a big wheel gobbles up obstacles. The only thing that holds me back from riding a big wheel all the time is a lack of a low gearing option.

    Leave a comment:


  • kahunacohen
    replied
    To bring closure to this thread, I ended up with Nurse Ben's custom KH29 with Oracle hub and disc brakes, and I love it. I am glad I went with the 29. I found the transition wasn't too bad. The biggest thing was being more careful to keep my lower core over the uni and not letting my body get too far in front of the wheel, esp on rough ground. On a smaller wheel, it's easier to get the wheel to catch up, but on the bigger wheel, I'm more likely to UPD. It is definitely a blast to haul down the trail on a bigger wheel, and little things like roots, I can just roll over.

    The disc brakes are great. As far as the cranks, it came with 165/137s. I've ridden 150s on the 29, and I prefer the 150s. I find the 165s tough because of the dead-spot. I just lose too much momentum going up even small hills. I am 5'8 with a 31" inseam and weigh 150lbs, so maybe body proportions have something to do with crank length preference. I would say that I'd prefer to walk up some bigger hills to have smoother strokes. I find it a real drag to ride on flats and easy uphills with the 165s. I use the uni as a commuter too, swapping out the tire for a Big Apple 2.0, and I think the shorter hole (137s) are even a bit long than I'd want, given I have a brake and can use it to help with control.

    Anyway, I hope this thread helps folks decide between the two sizes. I also see that now they are allowing component upgrades with the Oracle 29, so I wouldn't hesitate to get the Oracle 29, had I been in the market later.

    Now I would be interested in trying a 36, esp. for the commute.

    Leave a comment:


  • uniShark
    replied
    I've ridden more muni on 29 than other wheel sizes. But I did have a 26 guni, and I have a 24 that I've ridden a little on trails. Not enough comparison to say whether the smaller sizes are better, for me, for climbing. However, I do have enough time on the different sizes to have formed a personal preference overall for the 29. Even if the others are better for climbing, I would rather walk up more hills with the 29, for overall enjoyment of the ride. I simply don't like the smaller wheels; less rollover, feel twitchy to me, roll too slow, and just feel like kiddie toys. I note that I'm 6'4" and don't do a lot of hopping, which probably both influence my preference for a larger unicycle.

    Leave a comment:


  • skilewis74
    replied
    If you get the longer cranks, I'd keep the shorter ones for different terrain and for when your skills improve as they did for Kris.
    Originally posted by kahunacohen View Post
    Why are 150s standard on the kh29 as opposed to the 165s?
    As cranks get longer the dead spot becomes more of a problem and most seem to do fine w/ 150's, once they get used to them. People w/ longer legs seem to prefer longer cranks.

    I'm 5'10 and slightly longer legs than avg. for my height and prefer longer cranks in general. On my 24 Muni I have 170's but they feel like pedaling a box at times. I've tried 24's w/ 165's and that 5 mm completely eliminates all the box feeling for me. So a small change can make a big difference. I attribute most of my long crank preference to the partial paralysis in my legs.

    Also consider wheel size and weight. On a 26x3 Muni (closer to 28" diam and heavier wheel, both= more inertia) I rode has a bit less box feeling, but my stock 26x2" LX (lighter wheel, less inertia) has way more box sensation when pedaling than my 24 Muni. All three of these have 170's.

    Leave a comment:


  • kahunacohen
    replied
    What I am saying is big wheels seem to be the rage, but I am wondering if those who are having trouble with steep uphills with roots and rocks find it easier on a 24, or is the smaller wheel more of a problem with not being able to roll over as much and thus losing momentum?

    I see that in Kris Holm's book he seems to say a 29 is really best for fairly flat XC and a 26 is better for steeper stuff. Not trying to cause a flame war on wheel size, but wondering if folks are too quick to lose the smaller wheel...
    Last edited by kahunacohen; 2012-09-19, 03:06 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • kahunacohen
    replied
    So for guys that have such a hard time on the uphills with roots and rocks do you have the same problem with a smaller wheel, say a 24? The29 I tried was fun but not so much uphill.

    Leave a comment:


  • aracer
    replied
    Originally posted by danger_uni View Post
    Agreed- climbing bumpy hills is one of the biggest challenges in muni, and one of the more fun ones in many ways. I spend much of a chapter writing about climbing hills in my book, not sure if you have had a chance to check that out.

    Kris
    I've read it. Doesn't mean I can implement your suggestions

    Leave a comment:


  • danger_uni
    replied
    Agreed- climbing bumpy hills is one of the biggest challenges in muni, and one of the more fun ones in many ways. I spend much of a chapter writing about climbing hills in my book, not sure if you have had a chance to check that out.

    Kris
    Last edited by danger_uni; 2012-09-18, 07:49 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • uniShark
    replied
    Originally posted by DavidHood View Post
    By far, my biggest problem riding MUni is climbing up a not-so-smooth (rocks and roots) hill. On the road (pavement, asphalt, sealed tarmac, etc...) I can ride my 36er (137mm cranks) up some very steep hills like the 1/4 mile monster to get out of my neighborhood so it's not a matter of fitness but of technique. I had all but written off climbing bumpy hills off-road (and resigned myself to walking up many) until I met Ben King (who can climb his KH29 with 150mm cranks up any hill at Cherokee Park) so now I'm trying to work on my off road climbing technique again. I'm surprised there are not more threads devoted to this because that (I can't climb bumpy hills) was one of the first things I noticed about MUni. I ride up until I lose steam, take a couple of mini hops, and try to start up again at a less drastic angle but it wears me out too quick. I'm finding that I save much more energy if I just hike up the hills, remount, and ride the flat stuff to the next downhill.
    Yep, me too, climbing bumpy stuff is the hardest and most tiring part of muni for me. Good riders can probably do anything on a 29 with 150's, but for me, going to 165 helped make up for a little of my less-than-stellar technique climbing the bumpy stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • DavidHood
    replied
    Originally posted by uniShark View Post
    I find they (165s as opposed to 159s) help me with climbing more technical trails.
    By far, my biggest problem riding MUni is climbing up a not-so-smooth (rocks and roots) hill. On the road (pavement, asphalt, sealed tarmac, etc...) I can ride my 36er (137mm cranks) up some very steep hills like the 1/4 mile monster to get out of my neighborhood so it's not a matter of fitness but of technique. I had all but written off climbing bumpy hills off-road (and resigned myself to walking up many) until I met Ben King (who can climb his KH29 with 150mm cranks up any hill at Cherokee Park) so now I'm trying to work on my off road climbing technique again. I'm surprised there are not more threads devoted to this because that (I can't climb bumpy hills) was one of the first things I noticed about MUni. I ride up until I lose steam, take a couple of mini hops, and try to start up again at a less drastic angle but it wears me out too quick. I'm finding that I save much more energy if I just hike up the hills, remount, and ride the flat stuff to the next downhill.

    Leave a comment:


  • kahunacohen
    replied
    Think I'll go with the 150s for now and give it a good chance. If it doesn't work, I'll get the 165s and try to sell the 150s for a bit of a discount.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X