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  • penny farthing wheelie...

    Hmmm, if unicyclists are considered extreme then our forefathers (and
    foremothers) must have been a bunch of Kris Holms. I am referring to the
    story that goes like this... "Unicycles developed from people doing endos
    on their penny farthings".

    I recently tried this trick on my penny farthing and I still get scared
    thinking about it now. I was performing at a Goodwill Games event when
    someone in the crowd called out "do a wheelie".

    I obliged him by popping up the back wheel and riding for about 1 1/2
    revolutions on the front wheel. As the wheel is 42" across, this is quite
    a distance. It is very scary being so high up with handlebars just above
    your knees preventing any bail out should you overbalance forwards.
    Luckily I pulled it off and vowed not to do it again until the next time.

    Wayne van Wijk.

  • #2
    I saw John Foss do this as part of his unicycle show at the Davis
    Cyclebration. He explained, over a public address system through a
    microphone clipped to his shirt, how unicycling got started into as he did
    the trick. I'm not sure if he had ever done the trick before, I don't
    think he had. I know I watched him trying to figure out how to do it
    before the show. I can't remember exactly what he said after he finished
    the trick (which was also amplified), but the implication was he didn't
    want to do it again.

    John Hooten

    Wayne van Wijk wrote:

    [color={usenetquotecolor}]> Hmmm, if unicyclists are considered extreme then our forefathers (and[/color]
    [color={usenetquotecolor}]> foremothers) must have been a bunch of Kris Holms. I am referring to the[/color]
    [color={usenetquotecolor}]> story that goes like this... "Unicycles developed from people doing[/color]
    [color={usenetquotecolor}]> endos on their penny farthings".[/color]
    [color={usenetquotecolor}]>[/color]
    [color={usenetquotecolor}]> I recently tried this trick on my penny farthing and I still get scared[/color]
    [color={usenetquotecolor}]> thinking about it now. I was performing at a Goodwill Games event when[/color]
    [color={usenetquotecolor}]> someone in the crowd called out "do a wheelie".[/color]
    [color={usenetquotecolor}]>[/color]
    [color={usenetquotecolor}]> I obliged him by popping up the back wheel and riding for about 1 1/2[/color]
    [color={usenetquotecolor}]> revolutions on the front wheel. As the wheel is 42" across, this is[/color]
    [color={usenetquotecolor}]> quite a distance. It is very scary being so high up with handlebars just[/color]
    [color={usenetquotecolor}]> above your knees preventing any bail out should you overbalance[/color]
    [color={usenetquotecolor}]> forwards. Luckily I pulled it off and vowed not to do it again until the[/color]
    [color={usenetquotecolor}]> next time.[/color]
    [color={usenetquotecolor}]>[/color]
    [color={usenetquotecolor}]> Wayne van Wijk.[/color]

    Comment


    • #3
      [color={usenetquotecolor}]> I saw John Foss do this as part of his unicycle show at the Davis[/color]
      [color={usenetquotecolor}]> Cyclebration. He explained, over a public address system through a[/color]
      [color={usenetquotecolor}]> microphone clipped to his shirt, how unicycling got started into as he[/color]
      [color={usenetquotecolor}]> did the trick. I'm not sure if he had ever done the trick before, I[/color]
      [color={usenetquotecolor}]> don't think he had. I know I watched him trying to figure out how to do[/color]
      [color={usenetquotecolor}]> it before the show. I can't remember exactly what he said after he[/color]
      [color={usenetquotecolor}]> finished the trick (which was also amplified), but the implication was[/color]
      [color={usenetquotecolor}]> he didn't want to do it again.[/color]

      But I do!

      I learned this trick on a little bitty penny-farthing. This was a 1960's
      novelty bicycle with a 28" front wheel and 16" back wheel. In fact you can
      see a picture of a young John Jenack riding it if you have a copy of the
      Bicycle Builders' Bible by Jack Wiley.

      Anyway, that bike was easy to learn on the front wheel because it's
      smaller and lighter. With that knowledge, I tried doing it on Tim Bustos'
      heavy Ridable Replicas bike in my Cyclebration show. I practiced for a few
      minutes before the show. I also did the same last year, but with no
      practice in between.

      On the bigger bike (I think his is about 48"), you are indeed higher up,
      the back end of the bike is quite a bit heavier, and the back end tends to
      fall to one side or the other. It's easy enough to keep from going over
      the front, but putting more power into the pedals. But yes it is scary...

      John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com www.unicycling.com

      If you're a terrorist, God is not on your side.

      P.S. The same goes for Allah.

      Comment


      • #4
        On 17 Sep 2001 14:29:54 -0700, john_foss@asinet.com (John Foss) wrote:

        [color={usenetquotecolor}]>If you're a terrorist, God is not on your side.[/color]
        [color={usenetquotecolor}]>[/color]
        [color={usenetquotecolor}]>P.S. The same goes for Allah.[/color]
        As in If you're Allah, God is not on your side?

        Klaas
        --
        "To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been
        picked automagically from a database:" "missile, Usama bin Laden,
        Mohammar Khadafi"

        Comment

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