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Learning the 36 Inch Wheel

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  • Really, thanks guys.

    My next goal ride to my brother's house up on the hills and surprise him

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    • Originally posted by UPD View Post
      Totally at a sense of bliss
      A true "Uni-High". Like a runner's high, but better!

      Way to go UPD.

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      • Originally posted by LanceB View Post
        I think everyone's technique is slightly different, but my personal experience is that when hill climbing (on a big wheel), the extra effort applied to the pedals tends to make the unicycle swing from one side to the other. This is where I think a handlebar is helpful. Grasping the bar, you can counter the swinging effect, and keep the uni pointing straight. There is some upwards pull to assist your downward pedal thrust, but mostly (for me) it's keeping the thing upright and pointed in the right direction.
        By grabbing the seat or bar as you ascend, you are actually doing leg presses. This allows you to press down MORE than your own weight, like most bike riders are capable of.
        While you and I are having our cake-and-ice-cream party, the others are having a drink-the-blood-of-the-poor party in the back room. --[QUOTE=maestro8;1433130]

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        • Originally posted by LanceB View Post
          I think everyone's technique is slightly different, but my personal experience is that when hill climbing (on a big wheel), the extra effort applied to the pedals tends to make the unicycle swing from one side to the other. This is where I think a handlebar is helpful. Grasping the bar, you can counter the swinging effect, and keep the uni pointing straight. There is some upwards pull to assist your downward pedal thrust, but mostly (for me) it's keeping the thing upright and pointed in the right direction.
          By grabbing the seat or bar as you ascend, you are actually doing leg presses. This allows you to press down MORE than your own weight, like most bike riders are capable of.
          While you and I are having our cake-and-ice-cream party, the others are having a drink-the-blood-of-the-poor party in the back room. --[QUOTE=maestro8;1433130]

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          • I put in a few hundred miles with a handlebar on my 36, I could never climb as steep of a hill with it as I could using the seat handle, not even close. I can see the benefit on long easy riding with the handlebar, but when it gets hairy and I need lots of force or tight maneuvering the handlebar has always been a detriment.

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            • I recently started using a touring handle. My preconception of the handle was to pull up, increasing the force on the pedals. However, this has not been the case in my short experience with the handle. It is an upward bending shadow handle, uncut, pretty long. The handle feels, to me, like a long lever which only needs to be pushed and pulled gently to do its job.

              I agree with anton005...for a serious climb, the grab handle on the front of the seat seems to be the way to go.

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              • I recently moved to France to live and anticipated some great road rides on the long flat streches of highway that run straight for miles. Apart from this there are lots of small cross country roads that seem a joy to ride in wide-open spaces.
                However, I have been surprised to discover the opposite camber on the road effecting my riding. Basically, I have learnt to ride on the left in the UK and as I now ride on the right the negative camber on the highway is unbalancing me as it has the opposite slope. My right leg has always been my dominant leg for riding on the left, but now I require my left leg to be dominant for for riding on the right. I feel like a beginner wobbling and loosing balance.
                I am sure I will learn to compensite and change my riding style but I wondered if other riders have experienced this. For example when people take unicycling holidays to other countries or taking part in international events. I also wondered if this was particular to road riding as essentially its in a straight line and a repetative rhythm to the cadence - as opposed to off-road riding where the terrain is constantly undulating and the legs are continually swopping control?
                1 wheel, 1 day, 100 miles, 64 years...

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                • You may find that your tire has worn unevenly in response to riding on the left side of the road. I once mounted a tire in the opposite direction that I had it before and found the road camber to be intolerable. When I switched it back the other way it solved the problem. You could try flipping the direction of the tire and see if it makes a difference.

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                  • Originally posted by munimag View Post
                    You may find that your tire has worn unevenly in response to riding on the left side of the road. I once mounted a tire in the opposite direction that I had it before and found the road camber to be intolerable. When I switched it back the other way it solved the problem. You could try flipping the direction of the tire and see if it makes a difference.
                    Hmm interesting point. I have several tyres and shall assess them for possible reversing.
                    Thanks
                    1 wheel, 1 day, 100 miles, 64 years...

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