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  • Originally posted by Alucard View Post
    Hi Gang

    After I attempted the road race at Horwich I treated myself to a new unicycle.

    Anyway, to cheer myself up I've got the new 32” Nimbus. So far I'm liking it very much.
    I bought that one too earlier this year. It is much easier to mount that the 36inch and also coz it is closer to my 29" muni Nimbus which I have most experience with. I put some handlebars on the 32inch. It truly is a comfy uni. Hopefully it will bring you as much joy as it does me.

    Comment


    • Hi guys.

      Hope everyone is okay.
      I was thinking of posting a pic of my Christmas Day unicycle injury
      I caught my fingers in the spokes. With bits of skin missing it made it impossible to put my KH Gloves on so I unicycled without my gloves. Gloves are something that I always wear and it felt odd not to be wearing them. I thought I'd probably come a cropper without them but no, it was fine.
      I was unicycling on the grass, (29”) in the field where Mr B flies his RC planes. ( no where near Gatwick BTW ) Grass is a bit more difficult to ride on than tarmac but there is the advantage of knowing a fall won’t hurt as much.
      This time though there were sheep in the field and trying to dodge the poop added to the attraction. Anyway, the point I'm trying to get to is, (blowing my own trumpet here) that for some reason I rode my unicycle way better than ever before. I was able to slow my speed without falling off, think about what I was actually doing without falling off. I amazed myself.
      Though I still couldn’t freemount in front of people. But once they turned their backs I was off and running. So it was a good day.
      Not sure what I did differently, but if all my rides are like that I'm going to be a happy bunny.
      Anyone new to unicycling that has found this thread, good luck, keep trying and honestly, If I can do it anyone can

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Alucard View Post
        Hi guys.

        Hope everyone is okay.
        I was thinking of posting a pic of my Christmas Day unicycle injury
        I caught my fingers in the spokes. With bits of skin missing it made it impossible to put my KH Gloves on so I unicycled without my gloves. Gloves are something that I always wear and it felt odd not to be wearing them. I thought I'd probably come a cropper without them but no, it was fine.
        I was unicycling on the grass, (29”) in the field where Mr B flies his RC planes. ( no where near Gatwick BTW ) Grass is a bit more difficult to ride on than tarmac but there is the advantage of knowing a fall won’t hurt as much.
        This time though there were sheep in the field and trying to dodge the poop added to the attraction. Anyway, the point I'm trying to get to is, (blowing my own trumpet here) that for some reason I rode my unicycle way better than ever before. I was able to slow my speed without falling off, think about what I was actually doing without falling off. I amazed myself.
        Though I still couldn’t freemount in front of people. But once they turned their backs I was off and running. So it was a good day.
        Not sure what I did differently, but if all my rides are like that I'm going to be a happy bunny.
        Anyone new to unicycling that has found this thread, good luck, keep trying and honestly, If I can do it anyone can
        Well done!
        If you are female please join the “Female Unicyclists!” group on Facebook!

        Comment


        • Back again! Thx for birthday 🎂 wishes
          .
          "If you crash, relax and try to find a tree to cry under and then start over..."
          לחיים

          Comment


          • Trick to learn keeping the weight on saddle 😉.

            Originally posted by unireed View Post
            smooth: weight on seat
            veering left/right:not enough weight on seat

            Sitting on the saddle instead on CRAMPED BY FEAR legs ELIMINATES wobble.
            It is possible to make our behind to be our teacher by......eliminating fear.
            Using rollers & uni accommodates “teacher” in our bum 😂🤣.Obviously it is NECESSARY to stabilise on both sides.Roller do NOT permit unicycling.
            😫 I have attempted to attach picture of 1/2 folded roller with 20” uni BUT
            I was UNABLE to use my library = it does NOT accept iPad it wants computer input 🤔🤐.
            Veni !Vidi !Mount ! ' Public does not perceive it reacts'. Greg Harper.

            Comment


            • Been a few years since I posted here. Rode a little since, but not as much as I wanted. Just did my first ride of the season, one mile, no upds. Going to the gym during the winter helps.

              My cadence came right back, and I found myself chanting the old rhythmic cadence I used when I learned: "Sit on seat, chin up, wiggle fingers, breathe." Still helps!
              You can't work the body and not feed the body.

              Comment


              • Great job getting back out there AnimalCage. There should be a lot of nice weather ahead for riding now.

                I'm coming up on six years of unicycling now. My interest sagged a bit last year although I still rode some. I might have hit the limit of ever-increasing expectations for bigger road and muni rides. Lately I've been getting back to just noodling around at the end of my driveway on a 20", doing super-idles and riding small circles and figure-eights. It's really good exercise, good balance skill practice, and it lets my mind wander to other things while I do it.

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                • i'm starting a journal myself...

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                  • Thought I'd post this on an active thread.

                    Several weeks ago, my 19 yr old neighbor asked to try my unicycle. I ran into him a few times in the park recently, and each time I offered to let him try my unicycle again. Each time, he worked at it for about 10 minutes, showing promise. At one point I told him I'd look on CL for a used unicycle. As if by magic, the perfect unicycle popped up nearby. A 20" Torker, barely ridden, good price. I gave it to him the other day.

                    Then I ran into him yesterday in the park. He had his scooter. I asked him to go get his unicycle. He spent some time trying to self mount, holding on with both hands, on the thick grass. He was great at mounting, but riding away more than a couple revs was not going to happen.

                    I could see he wasn't getting weight in the seat, so I suggested we raise it. He said, "We need to lower it." I didn't argue with him. I lowered the seat an inch.

                    At some point, I said he'd have to go to the basketball court if he wanted to ride more than a few feet. We went over there, and he struggled on assistant mounts backing up to the pole holding the backboard. I could see that he was struggling to get in position. I told him to try to find a way to relax before he launched away from the pole.

                    He had a couple decent runs of 10-20 feet. He rode surprisingly slowly, which impressed me. In one run, he rode, came to a brief full stop, then rode out of. He was doing great.

                    Then his parents and younger brother came to the park. I was sitting down on the edge of the court, talking to the mother. The dad went over and worked with the kid. The dad gave him a shoulder assist, and the kid rode the entire length of the (full-court) basketball court.

                    Based on other accounts of beginners, as well as my experience showing other neighbors, I've never seen anyone learn so fast. Up to that point, he'd probably spent less than one hour on the unicycle, and almost all that time was spent working on free mounts on the grass.

                    What I recall, when he rode the length of the court, was he was not sitting up straight. Not even close. I remembered that he asked to have his seat lowered. That allowed him to stick his butt out back, stick his arms out forward and lower his center of gravity. Totally bad form, right? But how can you argue with a frekishly fast learner?

                    Anyway, I was just about in tears. I looked at the mom, then told her I wasn't very religious but what I just saw made me wonder if there was a god. Then I glanced up into the sky. The sun was setting, and some pink clouds had formed into one of the most beautiful sunsets I've ever seen, a bizarre looking spiral. And next to that was the sliver of the new moon.

                    Make straight the path of master (because he hasn't learned to turn, yet)!

                    Comment


                    • He would have learned even faster if you hadn’t started him out on the grass!

                      Oh well, I understand- California grass is pretty special. Even the Beatles used to sing about it.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by song View Post
                        He would have learned even faster if you hadn’t started him out on the grass!
                        Define "learned". I'm going to defend my methods, not because they're right, but just for the sake of argument.

                        He successfully transferred the free mounting technique he learned on the grass to the blacktop. He wasn't awesome at it, but he had a solid start. So, the result appears to be that he is learning to mount "even faster".

                        He was able to fall several times on the grass without any consequences. And he learned how to bail out on the grass, so when a UPD happened on the blacktop, he dismounted more gracefully. Weeks ago, when he tried the unicycle the first time, it was on the blacktop. He rode two pedal rotations (~12 feet) within a few minutes. I knew he could do it, but I was also concerned about safety, because he didn't have any pads or a helmet. That was part of the reason I wanted him riding on the grass. If he had a rough fall, that could change his (and his parents') mind about unicycling.

                        The grass made him ride slowly. When he started riding on the blacktop, he also rode slowly. I am wondering if it was because he learned the slow motions on the grass first. Riding slowly on the blacktop seemed to be the secret to his success.

                        I wanted to give him a taste of riding with both hands holding on, which, imho, everyone should try. He showed me he could ride a couple revs on grass without letting go with either hand. I believe he will get to riding on resistant surfaces more quickly because of this experience.

                        By removing the flailing hands from the equation while we practiced on the grass, he was forced to use all the other means at his disposal. Then, once he rode the length of the basketball court (he had both hands out for balance then), he was working with more than one system of balance.

                        I don't disagree with your basic argument, song. He probably could have gotten to the distance earlier. Also I might be totally full of it. You can understand that I'm not ready to give up on my teaching methods, however. The bottom line is that the kid is really talented.

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                        • Originally posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
                          The bottom line is that the kid is really talented.
                          Yeah, I met a teenager like that once. He rode maybe ten feet within a few minutes, on a rubber mat at an outdoor calisthenics area where I was using my uni for weighted pull-ups. Then he got on again and rode 15 or 20 feet. I told him how incredibly unusual that was, but he seemed to either not believe me or not care! Probably several dozen people who had never unicycled before have tried to ride my unicycle, and none of them learned to ride that quickly -or at all, actually- but of course he hadn't seen them.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
                            Based on other accounts of beginners, as well as my experience showing other neighbors, I've never seen anyone learn so fast. Up to that point, he'd probably spent less than one hour on the unicycle, and almost all that time was spent working on free mounts on the grass.
                            My elder son (32 years old at the time), learned on the grass in my front yard with less than twenty minutes in the saddle. The three riders I have taught averaged less than an hour from no experience to being able to ride in reasonable control of the uni. A couple more would have joined them in similar time frames except I didn't have the right size uni for them at the time.

                            What I recall, when he rode the length of the court, was he was not sitting up straight. Not even close. I remembered that he asked to have his seat lowered. That allowed him to stick his butt out back, stick his arms out forward and lower his center of gravity. Totally bad form, right?
                            Not bad form at all. There are three incredibly persistent myths that make learning to ride a unicycle far more difficult than it needs to be. Your learner avoided them all.

                            Myth 1: Weight on the saddle. Until the learner has the skill to keep the wheel under them, weight in the saddle will simply pop the uni out because the downwards force is offset from the point of contact. Start with most of the weight on the pedals. This keeps the centre of gravity low and on the axle rather than high on the frame. Aspire to more weight on the saddle but keep most of the weight on the pedals until it feels right when sitting.

                            Myth 2: Sit up straight. A vertical unicycle has a very small window of stability. The rider should lean slightly forwards from the hips. The unicycle must lean back to keep the rider's centre of mass above the contact point. This geometry has a much wider window of stability and the rider can adjust their balance by straightening and bending at the hips.

                            Myth 3: Use a fence for support. Leaning to ride is less about balance than it is about driving the uni under a continuous fall. A fence gets in the way if the learner is falling towards it and inhibits riding away from it when falling away. Many learners get stuck at the fence stage.

                            Only use the fence or pole to get a basic feel for the uni and particularly to learn how to steer it by twisting so they can drive it under the fall. Don't spend more than a few minutes on the fence. Any more works against the primary skill.

                            These myths persist because they describe the technique of an accomplished rider. A learner simply does not have the skills to control the uni under those conditions. Note that the first two are exactly what accomplished riders do when we need more stability on rough surfaces, weight on the pedals and lean the uni back.

                            I have tried repeatedly to dispel these myths, sometimes receiving quite aggressive responses. Few seem to care that all the evidence suggests I am correct, which is a pity because there would be many more unicycle riders if effective teaching techniques were used.

                            Originally posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
                            He was able to fall several times on the grass without any consequences. And he learned how to bail out on the grass, so when a UPD happened on the blacktop, he dismounted more gracefully.
                            I start learners on grass for this exact reason. The first thing to learn is the emergency dismount. They are unlikely to ride more than a turn on their first few attempts so the grass surface is irrelevant to riding but optimum for falling. Once they can accomplish a couple of revolutions and bail out safely they should move onto a smooth hard surface which will then seem incredibly easy.

                            Until the learner is comfortable with the emergency dismount they will be limited by fear. Falling skills should develop hand in hand with riding skills. (I've slid down the tarmac after stepping of the 36 at 25 kph.)
                            Last edited by OneTrackMind; 2020-01-29, 07:43 AM.
                            Triton 36" + 29" | KH 29" | KH 26" | KH 27.5" Muni | Nimbus eSport Race 24" | Torker LX 24" | Qu-Ax Luxus 20" | Qu-Ax Profi 20" | KH / Impact 19" hybrid

                            Comment


                            • elPueblo, you have an interesting method. Could you clarify grass for me (us)? Here in Europe, grass in most places is pretty uneven and I can't quite see how a unicycle can even roll (especially a 20") on it. Are you talking about "golf course" type grass?
                              Maybe you should make a video, that would be brilliant.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by pierrox View Post
                                Could you clarify grass for me (us)? Here in Europe, grass in most places is pretty uneven and I can't quite see how a unicycle can even roll (especially a 20") on it. Are you talking about "golf course" type grass?
                                Grass can be many things from a type of plant (including bamboo and bananas) to a description of a patch of such plants in many different situations.

                                Smooth grass in front of someone's house is often called "lawn" though some of them are not well kept and probably don't deserve the title. The extreme would be the "green" used for lawn bowls which is grown on sand, dead flat and rolled. (The bowlers would definitely not appreciate a unicycle on it.) A fairway and the putting greens for golf are usually somewhere in between.

                                I learnt on a rough lawn barely deserving of the title. The potholes and clumps drove me to despair sometimes. I had smoothed it somewhat by the time my son learnt on the same front lawn.

                                My preferred initial learning surface is a thick soft, lush lawn growing over very smooth ground with a downhill slope. The slope overcomes the rolling resistance of the grass and helps get over the dead spot when the cranks are vertical. It is easy to ride on this in an out-of-control way, building the sense of achievement, a feel for uni while getting the learner comfortable bailing out and taking a small risk without fear.

                                Then move to a hard surface with something to hold for a start or use a kerb mount. I have an aerobics step as a portable kerb. It is ideal as it gives the learner an elevated place to step from. A little bit of a downhill slope doesn't hurt at first for the continuity but they need to get to the level before too long. After the grass the hard surface feels very civilised.
                                Triton 36" + 29" | KH 29" | KH 26" | KH 27.5" Muni | Nimbus eSport Race 24" | Torker LX 24" | Qu-Ax Luxus 20" | Qu-Ax Profi 20" | KH / Impact 19" hybrid

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