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  • 24" versus 29"

    I'm not that big/strong. I'm wanting to cruise around more soon but was wondering if I were to get a Nimbus touring 29", would that be more difficult on hills and to handle (weight wise) then the KH24 with a hookworm? I am guessing so due to the larger wheel. I just find the KH24 takes A LOT more then the trials and dont want something that takes more leg power now. Just curious!

  • #2
    CBS I don't know about the 29" Nimbus it probably would be fun and I'm sure you would be able to do it, you're athletic.

    I recently purchased a Nimbus X 24 with a hookworm and I love riding around on it. I think it is my favorite (at least so far). I also have a Nimbus 24 Muni and I know what you mean about the extra leg power I get tired quicker with that.

    I think you probably could handle either fine but someone with more experience probably will give you MUCH better advice, since I really don't have any/much experience yet.

    I just purchased a Coker Big One and have had a few rides, because of my size I had to go with 125 cranks and it does take a lot of pedal power to turn that big wheel
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    • #3
      When I got a 29" I noticed the difference. Especially with the tank of a tire UDC puts on the 29" touring model. I rode that tire for just a couple of days before ordering a lighter tire and getting a lighter tube. Those two things really made a big difference.

      I was definitly aware of having to push more weight around but in a few days it felt normal. Your body just kinda has to get used to the feeling of a bigger wheel in more ways than just weight, but in the end a 29" makes a really fun uni to ride for distance/fitness. I'm really glad I bought one and it gets the most riding days now.

      I'm not particularly strong either, so I wouldn't let that hold you back. It's different but not that different.

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      • #4
        OK, I might wait a bit and see about more replies. I'm really not looking into right now having something that requires more muscle power. No hurry to get from one place to the next yet, just want to keep going longer and have fun. I'm sure one day I'll get the bigger wheel, not sure when lol. They should put a warning label on the first uni how they multiply!

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        • #5
          It isn't power, it's technique. Even a Coker/36" is only about equivalent to a touring road bike in bottom gear. When you can ride smoothly without constantly fighting the uni then the big wheel is very easy to ride apart from on the very steep stuff.

          As soon as you start putting steep hill or sharp turns in (narrow winding single track) the bigger wheel requires more concentration. Changes of speed and direction take more energy.

          A 29 is only 20% bigger than a 24. When riding your 24, are you working at 83% of your maximium? I doubt it.

          There are loads of things you can do on the smaller wheel that are difficult on the bigger one, and vice versa. In the end, it's what you get used to, and you learn to find routes that suit your wheel and your level of ability.

          But the basic rule is: stuff you find difficult technically, use a smaller wheel; long distance/stamina stuff, use a bigger wheel.

          One day, you will have one of each.
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          • #6
            Consider crank size as a way round the power problem. I'd suggest a 29"er, as they are quite fun to ride, and not much of a step up. If you can't handle the hills, increase the crank length for a bit, then when you are ready, put the shorter cranks back on for increased speed.
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            • #7
              Originally posted by SEoF View Post
              Consider crank size as a way round the power problem. I'd suggest a 29"er, as they are quite fun to ride, and not much of a step up. If you can't handle the hills, increase the crank length for a bit, then when you are ready, put the shorter cranks back on for increased speed.
              Consider more riding as a way around the power problem.
              My first novel, Bridge of Otherwhere, Michael Wilkinson, on Kindle. A tale of subtle magic, mystery, friendship and love. Tinyurl.com/Bridge-of-Otherwhere For US$ page: TinyURL.com/OtherwhereBridge

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              • #8
                options

                You are getting good advice here. I have both a KH 24 with a Hookworm and a KH29 with a Big Apple. If you want to ride around and go any distance...get the 29. You will be strong enough to ride it and crank length is the key to deciding how fast or hard you want to pedal. The 24 with a Hookworm is a great and versatile unicycle and you could ride it some distance if you wanted to but you'd much appreciate the 29 on longer rides.

                For my 2 unicycles, I have 4 sets of cranks, all interchangeable. I use the shorter 127s for the 29 and it is my distance rider. On my 24 I use 140s for normal riding and 150s for more difficult terrain as I have more torque. Finally, I have one set of 165s that are all about power and control but are not the most comfortable for less strenuous riding.

                If you buy a 29 with 150s, you will have a pretty versatile mid-range option.
                You will really like it for cruising.

                Carey

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Carey View Post

                  If you buy a 29 with 150s, you will have a pretty versatile mid-range option.
                  You will really like it for cruising.

                  Carey
                  Seconded, I bought a 29" as my second uni, soon swapped out the 170mm cranks for 145mm cranks. Excellent all rounder, however now i've bought a 24" muni I might put shorter cranks on the 29"
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                  • #10
                    OK, I think I"ll stick with my 24" with my short cranks on for now. Yes, one day I'll get the 29er! I am just already struggling with the 24" uni on hills and corners so maybe I need more practice time.

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                    • #11
                      You'll end up with one of each sooner or later. But the 24 is a versatile size.
                      My first novel, Bridge of Otherwhere, Michael Wilkinson, on Kindle. A tale of subtle magic, mystery, friendship and love. Tinyurl.com/Bridge-of-Otherwhere For US$ page: TinyURL.com/OtherwhereBridge

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by SEoF View Post
                        Consider crank size as a way round the power problem. I'd suggest a 29"er, as they are quite fun to ride, and not much of a step up. If you can't handle the hills, increase the crank length for a bit, then when you are ready, put the shorter cranks back on for increased speed.
                        That's exactly what I did. After about a day with 125's on my new 29'er, I put on my 145's, and lowered the seat a bit and rode like that until I was used to the bigger wheel. A few weeks later I put on the 125s (mainly because of a knee problem). But today I did my first hill since putting the 125's on, and I don't feel much difference. The percieved effort is about the same. Maybe on a steeper hill or longer hill I would notice it more. But right now I plan to leave the shorter cranks on as I put hills back in my training.

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