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Schlumpf hubs: general discussion.

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  • I think the blue nimbus rims are anodized. I have a rim brake on my 26" with a black anodized rim, and it works fine, but it does squeal a bit. Not sure if that's because of the anodizing or what, but it works fine as far as braking goes.
    If the rim is painted you can probably use a paint stripper to take it off, may be faster/easier than sanding. Good luck!
    "I'm a unicyclist. I make my own reality."

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    • UDC UK says it's powder coated, but I thought that wasn't how you paint aluminium normally?

      I'll give it a bash, if it works badly or makes a racket I'll look at taking the surface off!
      “It is well known that a vital ingredient of success is not knowing that what you're attempting can't be done. A person ignorant of the possibility of failure can be a half-brick in the path of the bicycle of history.”

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      • Powdercoating adds a layer of coloured plastic on top of the metal, whereas anodizing is more like a dye and will retain the metallic look of the base metal. It's easy to spot the difference when you know what each one looks like but it's a bit hard to describe in words .
        Unicycling is the fountain of youth.

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        • Schlumpf for birthday - configuration questions

          It‘s very likely I will get a schlumpfed KH24 for my 50th birthday. This is why I am starting to think about the best configuration for my purposes. I‘d be glad to get some informations from you schlumpfers out there!
          The reason I want a g24“ is that I don’t need a maximum speed exceeding 10-11mph while still being able to climb steeper hills. I will ride the new uni mostly in dry conditions on easy dirt tracks and pavement.
          What I‘d like to know is
          (1) what crank length is optimal for size 13-14(US size) (ca.size 48 European shoe size) shoes, by which I mean: at what crank length is it easiest to hit the button?
          (2) which are the best pedals for moving the feet into the right position for changing gears while still having good control on the uni? I find the standard pedals on m KH27.5 to grippy for moving the feet around while riding. (I manage to hit the right place on the cranks moving my feet around, but it takes a lot of effort so I think there may be better pedals for the purpose.)
          (3) Are there any other parameters other than the three P‘s (practice practice practice) that can make hitting the shift more probable/more consistent?

          Thanks in advance for your opinions,
          Hendrik
          Last edited by Onewheelhenni; 2018-04-29, 08:38 AM.
          ————————————
          I own: Quax 20“ / KH 27,5 / KH 20 / Nimbus Hatchet 26x4,8
          I‘d like to have also: KH 24+Schlumpf, Nimbus 24“ ultimate
          I‘ll never try: Freewheeling (too dangerous), g36 (too fast), giraffes (too tall)

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          • I don't actually move my feet on the pedals at all to shift gear, I just dip my ankle sideways. I hit the button with the ankle bone on the side rather than my heel. This does mean that when I switch to longer cranks I'm basically lost

            I'm roughly a size 12 UK shoe (I think that's about the same as a 13 US?) and can do my ankle bone-shift on 114mm cranks but if I go to the 137mm I've got to go back to heel shifting.

            I wouldn't worry about pedal type - just learn to wiggle your feet into position. That aspect of it is such a small part of learning to Schlumpf properly. Just get out on the (traffic-free) streets or your favourite practice area and find a way for yourself to hit the buttons both ways, you'll eventually just figure out a movement that works. The buttons don't need a serious thwack to shift, just a stroke downwards, so try to do it without any sudden balance-removing movements.

            I've only had the Guni for a bit so feel free to ignore my words completely - but I'm 100% comfortable on it through self-teaching and a bit of time
            “It is well known that a vital ingredient of success is not knowing that what you're attempting can't be done. A person ignorant of the possibility of failure can be a half-brick in the path of the bicycle of history.”

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Onewheelhenni View Post
              (1) what crank length is optimal for size 13-14(US size) (ca.size 48 European shoe size) shoes, by which I mean: at what crank length is it easiest to hit the button?
              If you have size 13-14 shoes, I assume you're also rather tall. I have size 13 shoes, am 6'2" and use 150mm cranks on my un-geared 24". I could probably get away with 137's, but very steep trails are a regular feature in my riding, and I need the extra torque. If you're tall, the hills are steep, and if you're planning on a combination of muni and xc riding of your G24, I'd suggest 150mm cranks. A lot of the decision involves what you mean by "hills".

              As a beginner geared rider, I think the longer cranks are going to help you stay in high gear in more situations and have more strength to make quick corrections. And you're not interested in riding past the run-out speed, which means you won't be spinning crazy fast circles, which are easier on shorter cranks. Also, I think it's easier to start with longer cranks, then move shorter after getting more experience.

              I have a G20 (that's right, I wanted to learn how to use the thing before transferring it to a bigger wheel) with 140mm Eiffel cranks. Heel shifting works well on that setup. However, in the four years I've been unicycling, my foot position on the pedal has moved more toward the toe. If I were in the middle of my foot, I might have trouble shifting on the longer cranks.

              I suggest you practice looking downward at your feet on your un-geared unicycle and "air-shift" against the axle-bolts. Try with both the heel of your shoe and your ankle-bone. You may have to slightly adjust your foot position before shifting.

              KH cranks may be best-suited to the shift buttons, because they have greater Q and help keep the foot from unintentionally migrating toward the shift buttons. I use low-Q cranks on all my unicycles. They seem to be more comfortable for longer rides.

              I'm eventually going to put my Schlumpf into a 24" wheel. Plenty fast for me. My G20, sadly, is currently gathering dust on a hook. The crank bolts that came with it started to deform under the torque I was placing on them, and last time I looked, no one was selling replacement bolts. I spoke with Silva Cycles, and they had the same problems installing the most recent batch of bolts. Silva told me that a certain hardening process may have been skipped in the manufacture of the recent bolts. Arrgh!

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              • Originally posted by Onewheelhenni View Post
                It‘s very likely I will get a schlumpfed KH24 for my 50th birthday.
                I couldn't wait; I got mine when I was 48 (a 36"). Not exactly for my birthday, but my wife and I ordered it around then.
                Originally posted by Onewheelhenni
                ...I don’t need a maximum speed exceeding 10-11mph while still being able to climb steeper hills. I will ride the new uni mostly in dry conditions on easy dirt tracks and pavement.
                What you are describing doesn't seem to need a Schlumpf hub. You may be underestimating the amount of weight that will add to the unicycle, which is especially noticeable when riding up those steeper hills. If you really don't want to go over 11 mph (18 kph), you might be happier with a 27.5" Muni that's lighter, and a lot simpler. Save the Schlumpf for situations where you want to go faster.

                For foot/crank size, my ~45-sized shoes work well with the 150mm cranks on my Schlumpf 36 but I don't have much experience trying to shift on any other crank size. For a slightly bigger shoe you might have to shift your foot forward on the pedal a bit, or not. If you do, you could then jump it back to the ball of your foot after shifting.

                My shifts start with a twisting of my foot to point my heel more inward. I have KH Spirit cranks, which keep my heels safely away from the buttons during normal riding. Before that I had the Moment cranks, which worried me more about accidental shifting, but it never happened. But anyway, I have to position my foot for the shift, and then after it's successful (which still is seldom on the first try), I pop it back to my normal riding position.

                For the most part, your crank size should be determined by the terrain, and your expectations of speed on it. I ride my (ungeared) 26" Muni in the 150 holes most of the time, but sometimes in the 125 holes. The short setting is fun for the speed, but difficult and tiring on the technical and climbs. the long setting is more sensible as the trail gets harder and/or steeper, and is the better all-around for challenging Muni.

                My point is, don't let your hub dictate your crank size; better to just learn how to position your feet for shifting, and then move them back. I do this with 5.10 shoes and pedals with big pins; my feet don't move unless I want them to.
                John Foss
                www.unicycling.com

                "Who is going to argue with a mom who can ride a unicycle?" -- Forums member "HiMo"

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                • 36er maybe isnt for me

                  Hi,
                  Half year ago I builded 36er and I'm not really happy with it, it Is too heavy And big for me. I've read a lot about schlumpfs and I think that 29" road GUni might ve the right thing for me. My question is: how fast can I go on 29GUni? (I'm fast rider, I can go 32km/h on 29MUni) Do I have a chance to get older Schlumpf for price of older KH36"?

                  Comment


                  • I got KH29 Schlumpf around my 48th birthday, a little more than a year ago, when I had been riding unicycles for just 9 months total. It took me 100 miles to learn to upshift without a UPD. I was too scared to downshift for several months. Incidentally I find downshifting is incredibly easy now but upshifting can be a pain sometimes because I find the buttons don't want to engage as easily as they disengage.

                    I started on 150mm cranks but now prefer 127mm spirit cranks. With a size 10 shoe the 127s are easier to shift and the ride is more stable. With the 127s I can get the 29 up to 21-22mph but will only do that with little to no wind, dry trails and when I feel fresh and not tired or overtrained. I don't like the 150s because it creates too much side sway at higher speeds and makes my knees sore.

                    Like most everyone does- I move my foot in a bit closer to the crank before shifting. What I've found works for me is to focus on pushing the inner heel hard into the pedal which forces my heel to rotate into the button, shifts every time. It might be a strange technique, and I may ride a bit bowlegged, but this works and makes it effortless (with practice).

                    My hub failed about a month into it. It kept freewheeling while upshifting and I'd land flat on my back at 10 mph. Florian fixed it, like he always does, and I've got 1000 miles on it without issue. I am still cautious upshifting because of this, and tend to try upshifting too slow, which makes it harder. My opinion is that shifting into high gear is best done at 8-10 mph. Any slower and the 1/4 rev it takes to engage can cause a UPD. At higher speeds I don't notice it. Downshifting is so much easier at lower speeds. It's all about confidence and I think 8-10mph is the ideal upshifting range, 6-8mph is ideal for downshifting.
                    Rob Urban
                    KH 29 Schlumpf
                    Nimbus 27.5 Oracle
                    Nimbus II 26 Muni conversion

                    Comment


                    • Tony, your 36er woes are exactly when I went to a G29 For me they're roughly the same speed but my average over a long distance tends to be about 1mph faster on the guni. I've no idea how you hit 32km/h on an ungeared 29er because I can just about hit 20mph on the geared 29er with a very fast setup (Marathon Supreme tyre, 114mm cranks), but I guess that just means you'll be even faster once you learn to ride the hub!
                      “It is well known that a vital ingredient of success is not knowing that what you're attempting can't be done. A person ignorant of the possibility of failure can be a half-brick in the path of the bicycle of history.”

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Tony Black View Post
                        Hi,
                        Half year ago I builded 36er and I'm not really happy with it, it Is too heavy And big for me. I've read a lot about schlumpfs and I think that 29" road GUni might ve the right thing for me. My question is: how fast can I go on 29GUni? (I'm fast rider, I can go 32km/h on 29MUni) Do I have a chance to get older Schlumpf for price of older KH36"?
                        Can you really spin around 230 RPM? I'm about 100 RPM!

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                        • Man, I don't know this showed me my cyklocomputer/tachometr/whatever Is it called.. it Was calibrated really well I can try to shoot a video And count RPM

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                          • So what's the current state of Schlumpf hubs? They don't seem to be for sale anywhere. Have they been discontinued?

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                            • Most vendors don't carry them as they are an expensive specialty item.

                              If the shop you like going through can't get it for you, you can order directly from Schlumpf.

                              http://www.schlumpf.ch/hp/uni/uni_engl.htm


                              Florian makes the hubs in batches, not sure what the stock level is like on the current batch.
                              My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world. - Jack Layton

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                              • Is the weight of a g29 wheel similar to a 36 and does the added weight make it feel more like a 36 in a straight line , those with both do you think they are worth 2.5-3 times the price of a basic 36 .
                                This is the most stupid thing you have ever purchased. "WIFE"

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