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  • UniDreamerFR
    replied
    Originally posted by rrurban View Post
    I ride with handlebars close to the seat but on my g29 I like to push it hard sometimes (18-20 mph) and never want hung up in the handlebars. I've decided to weld my own
    At 18-20 mph you don't need a handlebar to be in trouble in case of UPD !

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  • rrurban
    replied
    I ride with handlebars close to the seat but on my g29 I like to push it hard sometimes (18-20 mph) and never want hung up in the handlebars. I've decided to weld my own
    Attached Files

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  • UniDreamerFR
    replied
    Originally posted by rrurban View Post
    @UniDreamerFR

    Your set up seems great for my g29. I've been badly wanting handlebars but I'm worried about getting hung up in them during a high speed UPD. So, I want something close to the seat and not wide, to minimize getting hung up with my legs. Would you mind posting a shot from the top, looking down, of your muni setup?


    Thanks
    I never have my feet been catch by a handlebar during an UPD, long or short, they are not large enough for that.
    my G36 handlebar is 17 cm large, and my 29" muni handlebar (short) is 12 cm large.

    I don't think you take this kind of risk unless you make a very large handlebar, like a bike handlebar.
    Now if you make technical muni with you G29, with sharp turns between rocks and possible twisted UPDs, you'll probably prefer a short handlebar.

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  • rrurban
    replied
    @UniDreamerFR

    Your set up seems great for my g29. I've been badly wanting handlebars but I'm worried about getting hung up in them during a high speed UPD. So, I want something close to the seat and not wide, to minimize getting hung up with my legs. Would you mind posting a shot from the top, looking down, of your muni setup?


    Thanks
    Last edited by rrurban; 2017-08-25, 06:50 PM.

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  • UniDreamerFR
    replied
    This is my most recent set up on the G36
    Not really a home made handlebar but some DIY work on it anyway.

    -The Audio station is amovible and is made of carton, electrical tape and iron wire, scratch tape.
    -The front loop is made of two long bar-ends that I sawed, recovered with some foam, and an old tube that is wrapped by some iron wire to make it a bit less bully and protect it more.
    -The spoon on the brake lever is made of Fimo clay.
    -the brake lever is attached to a cut bar end to add some adjustability.
    -The handlebar is also linked to the frame with two bar ends that push against the frame (to prevent the handlebar from going down) and 3 plastic cable clamps pull it toward the frame (to prevent the handlebar from rising up). this system consolidates the two fixation bolts under the seat, and it also consolidate the adjustable seatpost.

    The audio system adds a lot of fun to the ride and at least people hear me coming by by the rear (the King George tire makes this 36er 100% silent). it's only 2 Watts but you hear it loud when I'm close.




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  • Klaas Bil
    replied
    use for handlebar on 36 inch

    Originally posted by JimT View Post
    Hi all, I’m new here. This is my first post and I hope it is it the right place. It is intended to be in the homemade handlebar thread.
    Welcome to the forum, and welcome (back) to the wonderful world of unicycling. Your post ended up perfectly where you aimed it.

    Originally posted by JimT View Post
    I find that the handlebar works well for three things.
    All of those are 'special circumstances': steep grades, catching the uni on a UPD, freemounting.
    But I think that, in addition to the above, you would find a two-handed handlebar also useful for just straight riding. That's where the handlebar on my 36 earns most of its points: adding stability to my ride and providing a place to comfortably rest my hands.
    For many, a handlebar also helps relieve saddle pressure, by putting some weight on the handlebars. But then it needs to be lower than yours.

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  • makym
    replied


    This is my concept for mounting handlebar. I use it with KH Zero and One saddles for few years already and I like it very much. The only problem is the stiffness of the saddle.

    Today I made 3d drawing as I wish to produce more smooth and light clamps. The ones I have are handmade with sharp edges and rubs my shorts greatly.
    Last edited by makym; 2017-07-04, 09:11 PM.

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  • JimT
    replied
    Hi all, I’m new here. This is my first post and I hope it is it the right place. It is intended to be in the homemade handlebar thread.

    After not riding for decades I recently picked up a 36” Coker and am working on getting used to it. I wanted a handlebar on it and found some scraps around to make a very simple one. In an online search I found no single handle bars like this but so far it seems to be working very well. After I work up to traveling longer distances I may consider a more “normal” handle with two hand grips. I have never had a unicycle with a handlebar before and handlebars were unheard of when I learned to ride.

    The seat post is a section of SCH 40 ¾” pipe that I turned down just a little on one end to fit the Coker. I welded a formed plate on the top for the seat and found some lighter weight tubing for the handlebar. The handle bar is 1” OD where it is welded to the seat post and then it necks down to a ¾” OD tubing. This works out well because most of the stress is at the point it is welded to the seat post. The handlebar is a section off of a RV refrigerator and was necked down and bent just as I used it.

    I find that the handlebar works well for three things. In my practice area I have some 10% grades and the handlebar works well for keeping control of my 36er with 127mm cranks. My original seat has no real hand hold as most new seats have. The long single handlebar also works very well for catching the unicycle on an UPD. It is just easy to grab and in the few days is use I have not dropped it once on the ground. The third thing that seems to help is free mounting. It helps to hold the unicycle straight when mounting.

    I've considered wrapping with some bicycle handlebar wrap but not sure that is a good idea. I do wear gloves with very good grip and that helps. Adding more grip to the handlebars in the form of bike wrap would likely catch on things that would not help.

    Anyway, that is my homemade handlebar for now.
    Jim



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  • Reeny
    replied
    This homemade handlebar is not pretty - but it is solid.
    With the brake it has raised the total weight of the hatchet up from 7.5kg to 8.5kg.
    So I may need to lighten the assembly a little by removing the excess plate.



    Leave a comment:


  • newob
    replied
    Originally posted by Eric aus Chemnitz View Post
    Yes it is. I didn't have much saddle time yet. Normally I ride a Nibus Gel. I bought a KH Freeride for this project first. But then last summer, I had a short testride on an eleven and instantly liked it. So I bought an Eleven. All riding I had on it yet, contained many dismounts as I'm learning to shift my Schlumpf. Untill now, it felt really comfortable, but I would not like to judge it until I did not ride any long tour with at least 2 h saddle time on it.
    Thanks, and looking forward to your review. I always mod my saddles (make the "relief channel" wider and deeper) so I'm disappointed to see that the cover seems to be attached with staples rather than cord or velcro.

    Leave a comment:


  • UniDreamerFR
    replied
    There definitely is a downside in the fact of decreasing the distance between the handlebars and the saddle when you use a geared unicycle.

    During my last urban ride with other unicyclists, I tried to get the handlebar even closer to the saddle than what you can see in my previous pic ( it was nearly touching the saddle) and if it was pretty good for hopping, riding in second gear was not as efficient as before because I wasn't able to accelerate as easily.

    Then I set the handlebar a bit further and lower and my ability to accelerate after shifting in 2nd gear was back.
    Hopping was still doable, I didn't find it more difficult to hop at least.

    This is my last setting:


    Yesterday I had a muni ride in the forest with this setting and that was pretty good, even though I still don't hop in my muni rides.

    So as a conclusion:

    -the further (and/or lower) you set the handlebar from the saddle, the easier you'll be able to accelerate and ride in second gear (probably because you can put more body weight in front of the unicycle) but you'll loose some of your ability to hop by holding the handlebars.

    -the closer you set the handlebar from the saddle, the easier you can hop (but it's more difficult to accelerate in second gear and lest stable when you ride with both hands in the bars).
    you have to find a compromise between those different settings.

    With my angled T bar I couldn't set it both close and low, if I want to test that I have to use a straight T bar.

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  • UniDreamerFR
    replied
    Concerning my new setting (inspired by Eric's one, see the "After" Photo few posts above) I gave a longer test on a parc/forest (knard inflated at about 21 PSI) and its was pretty good, both for riding in high gear( with one or two hands on the handlebar) and for hops/rolling hops.

    Nonetheless I suspect that your bar-ends, Eric, are set a bit too high for hoping with ease, I mean I had to set mine lower than yours in the first place to "feel" the good position that allows me to hop comfortably.
    And when I passed from settings to tests it confirmed what I was expecting.
    It's probably subjective though, the higher the handlebar is, the more arms are flexed while holding the unicycle during the hops, and it depends on how low your seat is set.
    Last edited by UniDreamerFR; 2016-04-18, 07:52 AM.

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  • Eric aus Chemnitz
    replied
    Originally posted by newob View Post
    Eric, that looks like the Quax eleven seat -- how do you like it compared to KH/Nimbus?
    Yes it is. I didn't have much saddle time yet. Normally I ride a Nibus Gel. I bought a KH Freeride for this project first. But then last summer, I had a short testride on an eleven and instantly liked it. So I bought an Eleven. All riding I had on it yet, contained many dismounts as I'm learning to shift my Schlumpf. Untill now, it felt really comfortable, but I would not like to judge it until I did not ride any long tour with at least 2 h saddle time on it.

    Leave a comment:


  • newob
    replied
    Eric, that looks like the Quax eleven seat -- how do you like it compared to KH/Nimbus?

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  • Eric aus Chemnitz
    replied
    Originally posted by UniDreamerFR View Post
    Will it allow you to do hops and rolling hops by holding the handlebars instead of the seat handle?
    Hopping and mounting work fine

    Leave a comment:

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