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What 36er should I buy?

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  • What 36er should I buy?

    I'm saving up for a 36" Unicycle. I have ridden a friends once before and loved it. Could you tell me what the benefits are of the different 36ers? I wouldnt spend a lot more on the best coker if it isn't that much better than another one I just want to know what the cheapest 36er that is the one for me. That could end up being the most expensive.

    Tell me about 36 inch Unicycles
    very creative sig.

  • #2
    I don't claim to be the world expert on cokers, but FWIW:

    I think it's worth the extra money for an aluminium rim (like a Stealth) and 14g stainless spokes. When I upgraded mine from the old steel rim and thick 12g spokes it was a massive difference in feel.

    I think the square taper/ISIS choice is a matter of personal taste. There used to be more lengths available for square taper, but now most are available ISIS as well.

    I had a super-wide hub in my old wheel, then swapped to a normal-width one in the new wheel. I reckon the normal hub is wide enough for strength with a good rim and tight wheel build, and I like the slightly reduced Q. I ride mine mostly cross-country and not had any problems (and I'm not ridiculously light like Sam W and Ken Looi - I'm 12st).

    Of course, if you go for a KH frame, you have to use a normal width hub anyway. I'm quite happy with my plain old Qu-Ax Coker-copy frame at the moment, although the KH is probably a bit stiffer.

    Apparently the new Nightrider tyre is nice, but I've not tried one so I can't really say - still using my old ever-lasting TA.

    Rob
    Last edited by rob.northcott; 2008-12-04, 05:15 PM.
    "Hedgehogs - why can't they just share the hedge?" (Dan Antopolski)

    "I would absolutely recommend a 29er to anyone who didn't prefer a larger or small wheel." (Mikefule)

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    • #3
      I am by no means a Coker expert but here goes. Listing various 36ers with key features.


      Coker Big one:
      super wide 48h square taper hub
      regular style aluminum frame
      V brake compatible

      Aluminum frame is the lightest you can get. I don't know about its flex.

      Coker V2
      Same as Coker Big One but with a Cro-Mo "squid" style frame.

      Heavier and stiffer than Coker Big One. Possibly stiffest (and heaviest) frame on the market.

      Qu-Ax 36
      48h regular width ISIS hub
      regular style steel frame
      V-brake compatible

      Rim does not have a flat breaking surface

      Nimbus Titan
      36h Supper wide Square taper hub
      regular style steel frame
      no brake mounts

      Nimbus Nightrider
      36h Super wide square taper hub
      triangulated Cro-Mo frame
      Magura compatible.

      Frame has great torsional strength but is a bit flexy laterally

      Nimbus Nightrider Pro
      Same as Nimbus Nightrider but with:
      36h super wide ISIS hub
      eyeleted rim with machined braking surface

      KH36
      KH Moment ISIS hub (regular width 36h)
      KH aluminum frame (27.2mm seatpost)
      Magura compatible
      Eyeleted rim with machined braking surface
      Double hole cranks standard
      KH-Schlumpf compatible


      What it all means:

      36h or 48h: a 36 spoke wheel will lighter than a 48 spoke wheel but a 48 spoke wheel will be stronger.

      Regular width or Super wide hub: a Super wide hub will give you a stronger wheel build but forces you to have a wider stance making fast spinning more difficult. In theory a 36 spoke supper wide will be slightly stiffer laterally than a similarly tensioned 48 spoke regular width wheel.

      ISIS - vs - Square taper: ISIS is a spline interface which results in a stronger connection between cranks and the hub.

      It used to be that you wanted a square taper hub for a 36er so you could get short and light cranks. Qu-Ax now has lightweight ISIS cranks in most popular sizes and they are relatively cheep. Another advantage to having an ISIS setup is that there are readily available dual hole cranks for added flexibility.

      ISIS hubs use 42mm bearings and Square taper hubs use 40mm bearings so you may not be able to put a ISIS wheelset in a non ISIS frame etc.

      Magura - vs - V brake: Magura brakes are hydraulic rim brakes, they are more expensive but very smooth. V brakes are what are found on most non disk mountain bikes. They are cheeper than maguras but can work almost as well if set up properly.

      Eyeleted rim with machined braking surface: Eyeleted rims will allow for higher tension resulting in a stronger stiffer wheel build. Machined braking surfaces result in buttery smooth braking.

      I believe that the Qu-Ax and Coker rims are 32mm wide and the Nimbus and KH rims are 42mm wide. All rims are double walled aluminum alloy. A wider rim will be more stable but may have more wind resistance (negligible).


      Hope that helps
      Last edited by saskatchewanian; 2008-12-04, 06:23 PM.
      My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world. - Jack Layton

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      • #4
        Wow, Saskatchewanian, what a comprehensive reply!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Klaas Bil View Post
          Wow, Saskatchewanian, what a comprehensive reply!
          +1! Thanks Man!

          Can I translate that to post on our website (It still offline but we'll have soon online!), with credits to you?



          Brazilian Unicycling Team

          Gobble, Gobble!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by pedrotejada View Post
            +1! Thanks Man!

            Can I translate that to post on our website (It still offline but we'll have soon online!), with credits to you?
            Sure, when crediting my name is Eric Pulvermacher.
            My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world. - Jack Layton

            Comment


            • #7
              Sask-man:

              Great post! Thanks.

              That is far beyond my exploration into 36er's but definitely of some interest to me.

              Do you have any translation of value/$? The price of the KH is 1/2 again as much as the Nimbus Nightrider. The Coker and Nimbus in the mid range, and KH at the high end. Is it worth the $$?

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              • #8
                Since this is going to be reproduced I decided to check a couple things I wasn't 100% on. I guess the Coker Big One frame is not the lightest any more, the KH is 94g lighter (799g vs 705g).

                So pedrotejada, if you could just say that the Coker Big One frame is light instead of the lightest that would be more accurate for your site.

                I am not going to try saying which is a better deal. Prices are different everywhere and everyone is unique in their preferences. This was written to help people see the basic differences between the unicycles without having to sift through all the other information we are given at sites selling them.
                Last edited by saskatchewanian; 2008-12-05, 02:59 AM.
                My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world. - Jack Layton

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by IUni View Post
                  Do you have any translation of value/$? The price of the KH is 1/2 again as much as the Nimbus Nightrider. The Coker and Nimbus in the mid range, and KH at the high end. Is it worth the $$?
                  The added price for the KH pays for the lightest and probably stiffest stock frame as well as the nicest stiff cranks out there. If you plan to ride offroad and/or up and down big/steep hills, then you'd appreciate the stiffness. Otherwise you'd probably be just as happy with a Nimbus or Coker.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by phlegm View Post
                    The added price for the KH pays for the lightest and probably stiffest stock frame as well as the nicest stiff cranks out there. If you plan to ride offroad and/or up and down big/steep hills, then you'd appreciate the stiffness. Otherwise you'd probably be just as happy with a Nimbus or Coker.
                    I agree. Another benefit of the cranks on the KH is that they are damn strong. I have bent *countless* square tapered cranks on my Coker(s)/Nimbuses. That stopped when I moved on to the schlumpf ISIS hub with the strong KH 125/150 cranks. That enough is a reason to get the KH, but now that the new Nimbuses have ISIS hubs,it may no longer be a main selling factor.

                    corbin
                    http://www.corbinstreehouse.com
                    maestro8 fan club
                    Justin LE fan club

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                    • #11
                      Thankyou for the advice everyone! Especially saskatchewanian! I still havn't decided what to get, but I still don't have the money. so I have plenty of time to decide.

                      If you own a 36", which one did you buy?
                      very creative sig.

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                      • #12
                        I think some of those Nimbus models that Sask mentioned are US-specific, but there are a couple of versions of the Nightrider 36ers on UDC UK. I don't think anybody imports the new Cokers either, so if you want one of those it would probably have to be a personal import (although I may be wrong).

                        My 36er started off as a Qu-Ax copy of the original Coker. When I bought it (it used to be DarkTom's) the hub had been swapped for a UDC super-wide hub and a 29er tube was fitted (I've never used a proper heavy 36er tube). I added a bmx calliper brake and rode it like that for a couple of years before I decided to upgrade the wheel. My new wheel is a Nimbus Stealth Pro rim on Nimbus ISIS hub (normal width) with 14g stainless spokes and Qu-Ax lightweight ISIS cranks. It's very noticeably lighter and much nicer to ride.

                        I'm using a normal KH Fusion saddle, which I find pretty comfortable, although I don't tend to do enormous rides (longest I've done in a day is about 60 miles, but I rode the unicon marathon without a dismount). No handle at the moment apart from the KH saddle handle (I mostly ride cross-country, but if I can rig up an easily removable handlebar I may give it a try for road riding).

                        Rob

                        EDIT: Actually, having just had a look on the UDC UK site, I think what Sask called a Titan is what UDC UK just call a UDC 36" Unicycle. Looks like they all come with aluminium rims now as well.
                        Last edited by rob.northcott; 2008-12-08, 03:25 PM.
                        "Hedgehogs - why can't they just share the hedge?" (Dan Antopolski)

                        "I would absolutely recommend a 29er to anyone who didn't prefer a larger or small wheel." (Mikefule)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I think i'll get a Qu-Ax http://www.unicycle.uk.com/shop/shop...?catalogid=696
                          very creative sig.

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                          • #14
                            If I was going to buy a 36" unicycle and I was going to use a brake, then a machined braking surface would be the way I would go.

                            I was put off a 36" by falling off due to brakes grabbing when the rim flared. This was before machined 36" rims were available. I went for a KH 29" and I love it.

                            36" Unicycles are very popular though, and if you have used one, then you know that you will get on with it.

                            Enjoy it when you get it.

                            Innes

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                            • #15
                              Sascatchewanian, Above you mentioned a disc uni hub? Are they available anywhere. I'm halfway through an ISIS splined disc hub for one of my homemade uni's but if they are made to some spec. I' like to copy one.

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