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  • Bumps in the pavement

    Hello again,
    I have another question (unfortunately I have no local unicyclist to ask and am far too impatient to wait until BUC).
    I took my dignity in my hands today & rode round the local pavements (which are in a shocking state). My question is: sometimes I went over little bumps, which sometimes I couldn't even see and they would throw me off quiet suddenly. I managed some of them and the more gentle slopes & rises. Sorry, still haven't got to the question, which is: is there a knack to this type of riding or is it just a practice thing?
    thanks in advance to anyone who can help.
    cathy
    Cathy

  • #2
    When you are coming up to a bumpy part, put more weight on the pedals, this will give you more control. Also when you are approaching a bigger bump, right before you are about to go over it, increase your speed, and lean back a bit.
    Last edited by glopal; 2005-04-17, 08:24 PM.

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    • #3
      what Mike said, and also, hold your seat with your hand. gives you much more control/stability.

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      • #4
        Hold my seat with my hand? One day maybe, but at the moment they are still flayling about helping me to keep my balance (or so it seems).
        Cathy
        Cathy

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        • #5
          ^^
          I guess it's something new to try tho.
          Cathy
          Cathy

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          • #6
            Balance comes with pratice, eventually you will be able to ride with your arms crossed, just keep at it.

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            • #7
              Agreed, one day you'll notice that you haven't been flailing for a while... which means it's time to try muni

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              • #8
                Id rather do technical Muni than ride on flat with little bumps any day.

                When im doing a hard trail i know i gotta pay attention and keep my eyes on the trail. When I'm cruising down the street im paying attention to.....ladies, cars, signs, who knows what. Thats when the little crap bumps get me and i feel like a fool.
                Neener, neener, neener. -harper

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                • #9
                  I did a 31-mile ride on Cape Cod, Massachusetts and this is how I part of wrote it up:

                  “With the dappled shadows (UPD) from the trees it’s (oops, almost UPD) hard to (almost UPD) see the root bumps (UPD).”

                  The entire write-up is here (link). It was a good week.

                  Don't worry too much about this little problem, it'll mostly go away with practice, but until you're REALLY good there will always be times that the all-but-unnoticeable bumps will get ya, and even then I think.
                  Brian C. Slater
                  AKA: Snoopy

                  Ok, I am now officially in my normal state of advanced confusion. Don't try to confuse me, it won't make any difference. If you try not to confuse me, that will confuse me.

                  "To not decide is to decide" - undecided

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                  • #10
                    Your choice of tyre and pressure can make a big difference. A fatter tyre at lower pressure will soak up the small bumps. If you usually ride with a hard tyre, try letting some air out so it has a little bounce.

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                    • #11
                      Personaly when I could just barely ride on flat ground I went straight ahead and did muni, I couldn't go more then ten feet again, but then after ridding muni for three days, I went back onto flat pavement and it was nothing. I think its best to chalange yourself, insted of just dooing something over and over that you can do with decent success, it gets dull dooing the same thing over and over, if it isn't chalenging enough and you learn slower.

                      So in other words if you want those pavement bumps to not even give you a second though, go ride down a grassy hill, or on some trails.

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                      • #12
                        To get over larger bumps I find stand up on the pedals makes it easier.

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                        • #13
                          Your body will eventually learn how to respond to the little bumps the same way that it's learned everything else on the uni so far. I remember when I was learning, running over some little twig or any other inconsequential bit of debris laying on the sidewalk would throw me right off. When you ride on a smooth surface like a gym floor, you are constantly making small adjustments to the speed of the wheel, to keep yourself from falling forward or backward. Hitting a bump or a drop forces you to make a similar correction instantaneously, which is a reflex that you haven't developed yet, but will. It all happens in a tiny fraction of a second of course, many times a minute on typical pavement, and for small bumps the action is pretty subtle, so you can't think your way through it. Keep riding until the reflexes develop.

                          Thunderstorm coming. Have to post and shut down now.
                          All brontosauruses are thin at one end, much MUCH
                          thicker in the middle, and then thin again at the
                          far end. That is the theory that I have and which
                          is mine, and what it is too. - Ms. Anne Elk

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                          • #14
                            Thanks for that.
                            I find the answers from this group to be very motivating. It's not easy to learn to uni on your own. (I especially find it hard to deal with people looking at me like I'm from Mars, laughing and making stupid comments). But you guys help to keep me going.
                            Thanks (a little tear gathers in the corner of my eye).
                            Sorry to be so drippy.
                            Cathy
                            Cathy

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                            • #15
                              No it's nort easy learning to ride by your self, but (a least in my case) it is worth it.
                              I know how it feels to be thrown off by small bumps, in my case I have been trying to get up higher bumps and the unicycle stays were it was my I go flying

                              Juggling_Arcs
                              If at first you don't succeed, Sky Diving is not for you.

                              No luck involved it was all skill... or absence there of.

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