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  • Originally posted by Tinkerbeau View Post
    How is this in other languages…
    In Norwegian the term for a bicycle is ‘sykkel’ and that does not give any indication of the number of wheels. Nonetheless, Norwegians tend to be more specific when talking about unicycles and use one of three words: enhjulssykkel, etthjulssykkel or enhjuling. All of which make it clear that it is single wheeled.
    Last edited by ruari; 2020-01-13, 09:05 AM.

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    • Originally posted by Klaas Bil View Post
      I sometimes state as an advantage of a unicycle that it has all-wheel drive.
      Kudos !!! (as we don't have a like button or similar)

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      • Originally posted by ruari View Post
        In Norwegian the term for a bicycle is ‘sykkel’ and that does not give any indication of the number of wheels. Nonetheless, Norwegians tend to be more specific when talking about unicycles and use one of three words: enhjulssykkel, etthjulssykkel or enhjuling. All of which make it clear that it is single wheeled.
        The other day I had some MTBers coming my way, with the lead rider exclaiming "Einrad!!" to which my reply was "Zweirad!?"
        Last edited by Tinkerbeau; 2020-01-13, 10:42 AM.

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        • Originally posted by Tinkerbeau View Post
          I find it (nerdishly ) amusing that for once German is the more 'forgiving' language; any human-pedaled vehicle is called "Fahrrad" irrespective of the number of wheels. I could be precise and call it Ein-, Zwei-, Drei-, X-rad but the basic Fahrrad covers it all, unlike "bike". And "all-rad" covers the uni just as much as a 6-wheel-drive desert-going truck.
          I find myself adjusting in English to the term "cycle" to describe my uni, bicycle or tricycle.

          How is this in other languages, I wonder, is it just as easy to use an 'incorrect' term as in English?
          What do other languages use for "exercise bike", or "spin bike"? I've never heard anything in English except "bike" for the one-wheeled contraptions people ride indoors.

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          • Originally posted by ruari View Post
            In Norwegian the term for a bicycle is ‘sykkel’ and that does not give any indication of the number of wheels. Nonetheless, Norwegians tend to be more specific when talking about unicycles and use one of three words: enhjulssykkel, etthjulssykkel or enhjuling. All of which make it clear that it is single wheeled.
            Bare et sprogs-spørgsmål?
            Hvorfor enhjulssykkel, da hjul er intetkøn?

            In Dutch, we use the word "fiets", which doesn't say anything about number of wheels. I believe that word also has German origins. Nevertheless by law a unicycle is not a "fiets", but as it is not named in law, they just call it an object, so the police sees unicyclists as pedestrians with objects. Kinda funny.
            Last edited by Setonix; 2020-01-13, 02:10 PM.

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            • Originally posted by Setonix View Post
              Bare et sprogs-spørgsmål?
              Hvorfor enhjulssykkel, da hjul er intetkøn?
              Here, is a reply from another thread from UniMyra

              Originally posted by UniMyra View Post
              As for the term "etthjulssykkel" vs "enhjulssykkel". We use both, and I'm not sure which is more correct. "Ett" and "en" means the same: one. We say "ett hjul" (one wheel) but "en sykkel" (one bike). So does "ett/en" (one) refer to the wheel (hjul) or to the bike (sykkel). Not sure.
              P.S. I once did a poll on twitter to see which was the preferred term. Make of it what you will

              https://twitter.com/ruari/status/1143527591191748609

              Might take away was I should use whichever I like as Norwegians seem to understand them all.

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              • Originally posted by ruari View Post
                Here, is a reply from another thread from UniMyra

                P.S. I once did a poll on twitter to see which was the preferred term. Make of it what you will

                https://twitter.com/ruari/status/1143527591191748609

                Might take away was I should use whichever I like as Norwegians seem to understand them all.
                Thanks. I reckon you only have that "confusion/freedom" in scandinavian languages. In Dutch it is just "eenwieler" and everybody understands, though most peeps don't understand why people want to ride them. They mostly think "Why be different when you can be a sheep like everybody else".

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                • Originally posted by Setonix View Post
                  Thanks. I reckon you only have that "confusion/freedom" in scandinavian languages. In Dutch it is just "eenwieler" and everybody understands, though most peeps don't understand why people want to ride them. They mostly think "Why be different when you can be a sheep like everybody else".
                  When I think about it, "etthjulssykkel" is the only term that makes sense from a language point of view. "Ett" refers to the number of wheels, and (as Setonix pointed out) the grammatical gender of the word hjul/wheel is neuter, so it has to be "ett" and not "en". Why someone started to use the term "enhjulssykkel" I don't understand, but I use it myself. It's just a word I guess.

                  Kids use the term "tohjulssykkel" ("two wheeled cycle") to distinguish a bike from a trike ("trehjulssykkel"). I've actually startet to use that term again to specifically point out that it's not a unicycle.
                  UniMyra's YouTube channel

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                  • Originally posted by Setonix View Post
                    In Dutch it is just "eenwieler" and everybody understands, though most peeps don't understand why people want to ride them. They mostly think "Why be different when you can be a sheep like everybody else".
                    I know somebody who says a relative started riding an eenwieler in the Netherlands because they are free on public transport? (Pedestrian with object?)

                    Originally posted by Setonix View Post
                    ... in law, they just call it an object, so the police sees unicyclists as pedestrians with objects. Kinda funny.
                    That is funny. But does this mean that you get the best of both worlds (choose between pedestrian and cycling rules) or are in the wrong all the time?

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                    • Originally posted by Tinkerbeau View Post
                      I know somebody who says a relative started riding an eenwieler in the Netherlands because they are free on public transport? (Pedestrian with object?)


                      That is funny. But does this mean that you get the best of both worlds (choose between pedestrian and cycling rules) or are in the wrong all the time?
                      In the Netherlands you have to pay for bicycles on the train. With the proof I got from the government that unicycles are not bicycles, the train companies can't charge me. I don't know if there is a limit on how big items can be that you take on the train, but a uni isn't that big.
                      Unicycles are only allowed on the pavement, if there is one, so when there is pavement and a cycle path, I'm not allowed to ride on the cycle path, which I do nevertheless, because it is easier to ride there. Also lights are mandatory on bicycles, but not on pedestrians, so technically when there are lampposts, I don't have to have additional light. They recently created a law that it is not allowed to use your mobile phone while riding a bike, but peds can still use them while walking. The only time I would use a mobile while on uni is to film myself, otherwise if I don't look at where I'm going I will no doubt UPD.

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                      • Originally posted by MrImpossible View Post
                        Lots of the old Schwinn ads I've seen call a unicycle a "one wheel bike", and (round the world tourer) Ed Pratt called his a "bike". I'm OK with it.
                        Ed was connected to other unicyclists before he started his big ride, but I don't know if any of them were nerdly uni-scholars like us. In other words, that may have been what they always called them. Alternately, he might call it a bike because it's easier/quicker to say, and maybe easier to keep the flow of his narration going.
                        Originally posted by MrImpossible
                        - while on my 36: "You've lost a wheel!"
                        me: "but it's twice as big!"
                        I sometimes reply to that one with "This wheel ate it!"
                        Originally posted by ruari View Post
                        That is interesting. I know that Ed Pratt mentioned dogs being problematic on his trip but I figured it was just a more general issue with all cycles. There are no loose dogs where I am, so never had the issue, luckily for me I suppose.
                        Ed was probably confronted by all sorts of dogs in all sorts of cultures. Ownerless dogs, free-range, car-chasing dogs, guard-the-property dogs, etc. In my experience watching dogs watch unicycles, I think they don't usually treat them like bikes because they're not used to them. The unicycle moves differently from a bike, so they may perceive it as some different "animal". I've seen a lot of dogs just watch, and tilt their heads back and forth.
                        Originally posted by ruari
                        In any case I still think that telling a dog that a uni is "just a bike" seems reasonable, as that is likely all they have encountered.
                        I talk to my dogs too. I know they don't understand my words. So I don't have an issue with people providing their dogs with inaccurate information.
                        Originally posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
                        "Don't you see that the whole aim of Newspeak is to narrow the range of thought?" --George Orwell (1984)
                        Next it'll be Trumpspeak -- if it isn't already...
                        Originally posted by ruari View Post
                        Nonetheless, Norwegians tend to be more specific when talking about unicycles and use one of three words: enhjulssykkel, etthjulssykkel or enhjuling. All of which make it clear that it is single wheeled.
                        For what it's worth, in the early 80s the unicyclists in Sweden were using "enhjuling". Possibly different spelling...
                        John Foss
                        www.unicycling.com

                        "Who is going to argue with a mom who can ride a unicycle?" -- Forums member "HiMo"

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                        • Originally posted by Setonix View Post
                          In the Netherlands you have to pay for bicycles on the train. With the proof I got from the government that unicycles are not bicycles, the train companies can't charge me. I don't know if there is a limit on how big items can be that you take on the train, but a uni isn't that big.
                          Unicycles are only allowed on the pavement, if there is one, so when there is pavement and a cycle path, I'm not allowed to ride on the cycle path, which I do nevertheless, because it is easier to ride there. Also lights are mandatory on bicycles, but not on pedestrians, so technically when there are lampposts, I don't have to have additional light. They recently created a law that it is not allowed to use your mobile phone while riding a bike, but peds can still use them while walking. The only time I would use a mobile while on uni is to film myself, otherwise if I don't look at where I'm going I will no doubt UPD.
                          My gosh. Too funny! It’s all in the technicalities. I was thinking the same, I was riding a uni and texting at the same time. You aren’t allowed to drive a car and touch a mobile phone here in Aus, but I can ride a uni and text... I can’t ride a bike and text though, because I need to hold a handle on my bike when I ride and so texting doesn’t work....
                          Last edited by Gockie; 2020-01-14, 10:05 AM.
                          If you are female please join the “Female Unicyclists!” group on Facebook!

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                          • Originally posted by Gockie View Post
                            My gosh. Too funny! It’s all in the technicalities. I was thinking the same, I was riding a uni and texting at the same time. You aren’t allowed to drive a car and touch a mobile phone here in Aus, but I can ride a uni and text... I can’t ride a bike and text though, because I need to hold a handle on my bike when I ride and so texting doesn’t work....
                            You can't let go of handle of the bike, now that you learned to ride uni, or you couldn't even before that?

                            I could before I learned to ride uni, but now it feels too weird to let go. A bike responds differently from a uni and I feel I'm less in control. Unicyclists are weird creatures ^_^

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                            • Originally posted by johnfoss View Post
                              For what it's worth, in the early 80s the unicyclists in Sweden were using "enhjuling". Possibly different spelling...
                              It's the same. You see this if you go to UDC Sweden and all the unicycles are under the heading Enhjulingar (the ‘ar’ ending just pluralises it in Swedish).

                              Also, from the other thread

                              Originally posted by UniMyra View Post
                              I say "enhjulssykkel" or the short term "enhjuling". Maybe we're influenced by Sweden…
                              Additionally, sometimes I search for unicycle related stuff on Twitter. If I search for “enhjuling” it is mainly Swedish. That said, if I want Norwegian only results I can do “enhjuling (lang:no)”, which is a handy tip for anyone here on Twitter. Actually if you want to search all of Twitter for Norwegian references to unicycles, this would do the job fairly well: “(enhjuling (lang:no)) OR enhjulssykkel OR etthjulssykkel”. I intentionally do not force Norwegian surrounding text on the latter two words, as there is no need to exclude Swedish in those cases. It also brings up more results where some English and Norwegian are used together.

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                              • Originally posted by ruari View Post
                                That said, if I want Norwegian only results I can do “enhjuling (lang:no)”, which is a handy tip for anyone here on Twitter.
                                The question is why anybody who is not scandinavian, would even want to search for Norwegian unicycle stuff. :P

                                Searching for the English "unicycles" gives already enough hits.

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