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Best Elbow pads after surgery

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  • Best Elbow pads after surgery

    Took a bad fall on basketball court. Was wearing wrist guards but no elbow guards. Fractured elbow into multiple pieces. Surgery in four days once swelling goes down. Anyone have recommendations for really good elbow guards? I'm not interested in saving a few dollars here and there. Just the best protection so I can get back on my uni and know I won't undo my surgery or break my other elbow. All of this, of course, after surgeon gives the ok. Thanks.

  • #2
    Hi Johnny,

    that is a very unlucky fall. Nowadays, you have some soft-but-hardening-on-impact protection like the G-Form (and plenty of other brands). That may provide comfort yet shock absorption as regular hardshell, while cheaper, may still send some energy into your elbow.

    I am rarely falling on elbow so I cannot comment much but I am sure a fellow rider will post his/her 2 cents.

    Good thing you have riding as a motivation to resume sport once you are cleared by the doctor (make the recovery less of a mental drag).
    => CrMo 29: KH XC rim, Nimbus CrMo hub, Spirit 110/137 & Schwalbe Big One
    => Flansberrium 26: Nextie rim, JumboJim 4.0, Spirit 127/150mm, M4O ISIS

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    • #3
      Sorry to hear about your injury. At least it wasn't caused by unicycling ;-)
      Several years ago I fractured my patella (knee cap) mountain biking and surgeon removed over half of it. Told me another impact like that would be "unfixable" so knee pads are a requirement at all times while riding one or two wheels.

      I highly recommend POC Joint VPD 2.0. I have those in knee and elbow. They utilize "viscous polymer dough" the material Siddhartha mentioned that's soft but hardens on impact. I had a good (bad) UPD and landed will all my body weight on my surgery knee and the pad worked very well. Still riding :-)

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      • #4
        I haven't really compared so much, but as Siddhartha said, I would get something with one of the new soft/hard compounds. The first I saw on the market was 3DO and now others have it too. I have Race Face knee with 3DO and IXS Carve elbow pads (technology is called XmatterTM).

        I am very happy with my IXS Carve pads:
        https://ixs.com/en/bike/mtb-equipmen...bow-guard-grey

        If you're looking fox max protection, me guess would be most of the soft/hard compounds are similar, so maybe you could compare based on compound weight or thickness (i.e. 10mm of 3DO should give more protection then 2mm and the weight should also be proportional to thickness). Although not sure if you will find that data anywhere. In a shop you could probably measure it yourself.
        36" Nimbus Oracle, VCX 100/125/150, 200mm disc
        29+ KH, Maxxis DHR II 29x3, 127/150 Spirits
        Schlumpf (KH29) Duro Crux 29x3.25 137/117 Spirits
        26" Nimbus, Maxxis DHR IIx2.8, 117/137 Sprt
        19" Trials Impact Athmos
        20" Qu-Ax Profi Freestyle, 89mm VCX

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        • #5
          Thank you all for the input. As long as coronavirus doesn't shut down my hospital, I'll start my recovery, and plans for Unicyle Part II later this week.

          I'll do my research on the soft/hard compounds. New to me...

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          • #6
            Unicycle falling protection. I gave this a lot of consideration during my learning and "accident" stage.
            What am I really trying to protect when I fall?
            Avoiding my face and chest. Right?
            So, then I instinctively stick my hands and arms into rigid "landing gears" to save my face and chest.

            Try this. What if you fall on soft grass or a rubber playground surface? It's okay to let the face and chest touch down, right?
            Then you're body doesn't make a herculean effort to quickly drop the landing gears for impact right?

            So, I thought about bmx chest pad and helmet w/chin guard.
            What does that do? Well if you had those on you just fall on your face and chest. Instant cushion.
            Now, you don't need your "landing gears" anymore.

            So then you can just fall down flat on your face and body.
            You may need to practice a few times to get comfortable and instinctive, but now your wrist and arms can be limp and just flail and slap the ground.
            The wrist and arms will no longer try to become "rigid/extended" to break upon landing.

            So, pads or re-reinforcement may be useless. Yes, abrasion and surface contact can be cushioned. However, the wrenching/torque on your rigidly extended arms/wrist won't withstand breakage in vulnerable positions.

            Keep on
            Last edited by slamdance; 2020-03-28, 05:34 PM. Reason: Optional

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