Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Idling

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • finnspin
    replied
    I don't think I've ever idled on a trail. But I often do some "stillstands"/coming to a stop and turning in place or very occasionally I roll back half a revolution. Idling can help teach you the unicycle control you need for that. Or, alternatively, you can learn the unicycle control over time practicing other stuff, and idling will be easy one day.

    Leave a comment:


  • Setonix
    replied
    Originally posted by johnfoss View Post
    Such as in the philosophy of Rolling Trials, where the idea is to NOT hop.
    Do you have a video of the Rolling Trials to cover the same distance where you would otherwise fly through the air from one sewer pipe to the next :--)))
    Last edited by Setonix; 2020-05-13, 10:28 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnfoss
    replied
    Originally posted by Mikefule View Post

    I believe that wheels are round so they can roll. Some unicyclists prefer to believe that tyres are rubber so they bounce.
    Yes! My wheels are round AND made of rubber so I have options. On rough terrain, rolling back (for an idle or a mount) could make matters worse, so hopping often makes more sense. Unless you're trying to do things the hard way (beyond the obvious fact of being on a unicycle), and challenging yourself. Such as in the philosophy of Rolling Trials, where the idea is to NOT hop.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mikefule
    replied
    Originally posted by Gockie View Post

    Maybe hop though? In the woods, maybe the ground surface is a little uneven.
    Fair point. But I'm old fashioned: I believe that wheels are round so they can roll. Some unicyclists prefer to believe that tyres are rubber so they bounce.

    Leave a comment:


  • MuniEmu
    replied
    Thanks Garp, I'll give that a go.

    I just re-read my post and realised I meant to say more weight on the SEAT was helpful, as in I started out with too much weight on the feet. I am also very one sided in a lot of skills, so I need to work on that as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Garp
    replied
    Originally posted by MuniEmu View Post
    So here's a question... given our current lockdown situation, I have been giving more time to devloping some skills instead of just riding around like I usually do. The comments about more weight on the feet when idling seem to have helped, and my idling is now more consistent and more relaxed, but I still can't correct towards the left. My preferred side is to idle with the right foot down and I can happily correct my balance with small shifts to the right, but if I need to correct the other way, I just can't do it. So I either end up drifting further and further to the right hand side (less of an idle and more of a right hand crab), or have to give a little hop to regain my composure. Any tips?
    I had a very similar problem. With the right foot down, I would steadily drift to the right. With the left, I would stay in place but slowly spin counterclockwise. No amount of practice seemed to help.
    A usual trick to break through a plateau is to go for a harder version of the same thing. So I started idling with one hand holding the seat. It was A LOT harder. As in super-bad an sketchy and all over the place. But eventually it got a better and and after a week or so of the harder version, I could finally control drifting and spinning when idling normally (with both hands out).
    For the sake of versatility, when practicing with one hand on the seat, I would cycle through all four foot/hand stances: right/right, right/left, left/left and left/right. But that's just me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gockie
    replied
    Originally posted by Mikefule View Post

    It's a vital skill when exploring narrow winding unmade paths in the woods. I'd be wary of relying on it on the road because of how other road users may react.
    Maybe hop though? In the woods, maybe the ground surface is a little uneven.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mikefule
    replied
    Originally posted by Setonix View Post

    you have to ask yourself if it is really that important for you. I've been riding since 2015 and though I tried it a bit, I've never been in the situation where I needed to be able to idle. I just as easily dismount and mount, like at a traffic light. Most of the time I just ride and ride and ride. ^_^
    It's a vital skill when exploring narrow winding unmade paths in the woods. I'd be wary of relying on it on the road because of how other road users may react.

    Leave a comment:


  • MuniEmu
    replied
    So here's a question... given our current lockdown situation, I have been giving more time to devloping some skills instead of just riding around like I usually do. The comments about more weight on the feet when idling seem to have helped, and my idling is now more consistent and more relaxed, but I still can't correct towards the left. My preferred side is to idle with the right foot down and I can happily correct my balance with small shifts to the right, but if I need to correct the other way, I just can't do it. So I either end up drifting further and further to the right hand side (less of an idle and more of a right hand crab), or have to give a little hop to regain my composure. Any tips?

    Leave a comment:


  • slamdance
    replied
    More on Idling:

    As I am progressing more on idling I am "quickly forgetting" the basic elements that I articulated before.
    What I wrote before does still apply. It is valid for a total beginner or someone who wants to analyze the elements involved.
    However, I don't think about each basic elements anymore. From practicing the motion over/over my body has "synchronized/orchestrated" those elements.
    So, idling to me feels like a single synchronized repetitive motion, now. It's almost automatic.
    However, there are still a few basic things that go through my mind:

    1.) Full weight on saddle and body straight.
    2.) Rock my upper body just using hips.
    3.) Perfect equal pressure on both pedals. (mentally visualize and feel both pedals working in each direction)

    The last point 3.) applied whether I do a"standing" idle or a "perfectly seated" with minimal rock.
    Have you ever heard of Standing Idle? It's where you actually stand with maximum weight on pedal.
    I did not just invent that. I'm sure others can do it, but nobody has ever mentioned it.

    So, when you this you will actually reach a 3 & 9 o'clock pedal stall, as you rock back and forth.
    Why do this? Well, I found that it helps my backwards riding, immensely.
    Now, it's not "efficient" so I won't do any juggling with this maneuver, but it builds leg strength and stall balance skill.
    For anyone who can already idle, I highly recommend you try this. This is a great warm-up, also.
    Last edited by slamdance; 2020-04-13, 04:25 AM. Reason: Optional: Reason: Optional:

    Leave a comment:


  • johnfoss
    replied
    Originally posted by JimT View Post
    Just like riding a unicycle, once you learn to a point, you will always be at that point.
    I think this is true, except maybe at the extremes of difficulty or athleticism. The athleticism part is easy to understand; if you come back 30 year later and you weigh more and are out of shape, 'nuff said. For the more difficult, sensitive skills, more time may be required to get back to a level where you can do it will. For many years, a 3 min. Freestyle routine was a part of every show I did. I had done it so many times, on so many different surfaces (grass, slippery wood, carpet), I had it so down I could do it (on a friendly surface) without a warmup, while suffering from the flu, on a borrowed unicycle, etc. But over the years the amount of shows dwindled, to a trickle, and then a very slow drip. Now I have to do a bunch of practicing just to get through that same basic routine. I'm happy I can still do it though!

    It's odd to think of doing idling with the top foot in control. I didn't even understand how that would work until I read Slamdance's version. Maybe I did a little of that myself when I was learning, and only during the process did I figure out that the bottom foot had all the power. The top foot method only works for going through the motions, but is not great at actually sustaining an idle.

    I learned idling from a few pictures and brief descriptions in the Schwinn Unicycle manual. It took a while for it to "click". Also I think I learned it on a Schwinn Giraffe. It's easier to idle on a giraffe, though I can't necessarily recommend it as a method. But that's what I had at the time, and I was 17, so falling wasn't a problem (meaning that we fell a LOT). I was holding on to a high fence, or a pole, etc. I do not remember if we learned Idling first, or freemounting the Giraffes, believe it or not! But I definitely don't recommend even riding a giraffe if you can't idle. It' s not that you can't ride one, it's just a lot safer for you, and whoever/whatever is around you.

    Leave a comment:


  • fetzenschorsch
    replied
    I think Billy Idle thinks different, here is his Song Rebel L


    Last edited by fetzenschorsch; 2020-03-31, 01:14 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Quax1974
    replied
    If Mr Idol himself is against idling than I shall refrain from ever trying it again.

    I will go home to dance with myself now...

    Leave a comment:


  • fetzenschorsch
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	BillyIdol.jpg
Views:	160
Size:	48.6 KB
ID:	2802929
    Idling in NYC has been prohibited since 1972!
    Is that a law against Unicyclists?
    Last edited by fetzenschorsch; 2020-03-31, 11:23 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • pierrox
    replied
    Originally posted by slamdance View Post
    It comes down to the "two types" of unicycle riders.
    The one's are able to "fully weight" their saddle, and the beginners or off-road riders who have more weight on their pedals.
    Yes, the age old battle of the butt riders vs the kick standers!!!
    That's the best advice ever seen, in a condensed way. Thanks!

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X