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  • TheOracle
    replied
    Thanks for the replies! I forgot to mention that the 2.5 hrs was with some breaks; I think I had 4 or 5 breathers in there. Breaks do help, but I think 9-10 mph is about optimal on a 36" with my 100mm cranks that I have on right now (they are the 100/125/150mm).
    Originally posted by bungeejoe

    Yes, it sounds doable. I would not find it a problem. Many sports and cycling coaches recommend weekly increase of 15% or less as a guide. 50 miles daily is a good goal. I’ve tried 80 dairy with the 7th or 8th day a rest day hard to sustain. 60 miles daily was more enjoyable. You are a lot younger, so I'm sure 50 miles daily maybe attainable. I have managed 1000+ miles in two and a half weeks with a support vehicle unicycling the coastal route from Canada to California. Self-support is increasingly difficult as you try to carry more and spend less.

    One wise experienced touring cyclist shared the recommendation of only plastic. YES, one credit card and what you need to ride today. I’ve found his method of touring most satisfying.

    Many, if not most, younger touring cyclists find a need for many more material possessions than just a kit, a couple bottles, and a credit card.

    if you run into problems I try to be available. Last time I tried the PM feature was not yet working. Just put a shorty note or phone number in the subject and only one character in the message and it worked for me.

    Enjoy,
    JM
    15% increase sounds like a doable number, and it would get me to the requisite 50 miles by the end of May. I dropped down to an 18 mile ride this week over 1:45 with breaks when I tired out, and that was very easy to do. Weight will be a little difficult for me. I think I'll be able to make a frame to put bags on, and then look at getting the bags from Cary Grey (if he still sells them). I live in Michigan and would probably head towards Banff National Park, then see how far north I could make it after that. End result would hopefully the Dempster Highway through the Arctic...but I doubt I could make it there over the Summer. All pending on the fact that the border will be open at that point... I agree, going light is the only option. I've been doing some looking at ultralight backpacking for it. However, there are stretches where I would probably have to make it for a week without resupply. A credit card might not taste too good at that point :-). But point well taken, only one pair of socks. I'm used to roughing it anyway.
    Side note: PM sent in specific manner, it should get through.
    Paul

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  • JimT
    replied
    Originally posted by TheOracle View Post
    Time to get distance...yes, that is what I'm after. I reached 18mph in my quest for speed, which I've decided is enough for me for the time being. 20mph can wait a little longer. I've got a different way to kill my body now . This summer is going to be my last before I go to college, so I want to do something special. Ed Pratt and his youtube vids have been an inspiration lately, so I'm considering just starting out my front door after graduation and seeing how far I can make it before the fall semester starts, unipacking as I go. I'd like to be able to comfortably ride a good 50 miles--and wake up ready to do it again the next day, by the end of May. I've been increasing my distance lately. I was at 14 miles last week. Yesterday I went for 22 miles in 2.5 hours and it almost killed me. I was wobbling all over the road on the way back! I'd prefer not to quite do that to myself again...does anyone know if I could get to 50 miles in that time, and what a reasonable mileage increase per week would be?

    Paul
    I think for consistent long distance riding you have to pace yourself. For training the 22 miles in 2.5 hours is good but for long distance day after day, take it easy and take frequent breaks. Last year I put in a 70 mile very relaxed day (12 hours) but on a single training run I'd only did about 15 miles in a single run.

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  • TheOracle
    replied
    Time to get distance...yes, that is what I'm after. I reached 18mph in my quest for speed, which I've decided is enough for me for the time being. 20mph can wait a little longer. I've got a different way to kill my body now . This summer is going to be my last before I go to college, so I want to do something special. Ed Pratt and his youtube vids have been an inspiration lately, so I'm considering just starting out my front door after graduation and seeing how far I can make it before the fall semester starts, unipacking as I go. I'd like to be able to comfortably ride a good 50 miles--and wake up ready to do it again the next day, by the end of May. I've been increasing my distance lately. I was at 14 miles last week. Yesterday I went for 22 miles in 2.5 hours and it almost killed me. I was wobbling all over the road on the way back! I'd prefer not to quite do that to myself again...does anyone know if I could get to 50 miles in that time, and what a reasonable mileage increase per week would be?

    Paul

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  • Setonix
    replied
    Originally posted by Canoeheadted View Post
    For my cross country riding the standing is a much higher percentage.
    Downhill section - standing percentage 10%?
    Level section - standing 5%?
    Uphill section - standing 50-75%?
    True enough, when offroading, especially when it is very bumpy, I tend to put more weight on the pedals, but it isn't quite the same as standing. I think it is half sitting, half standing. Maybe when going downhill, the braking with my legs, instead of a brake, lifts me more up from the seat. I get saddle soreness roughly after 10km, which is mostly when sitting and difference in saddle also has an impact.
    Standing up every 5 minutes I think is overkill. If I could do every 15 mins it should be enough.

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  • Canoeheadted
    replied
    Another question would be "why do you stand?"

    I stand for power and stability when I ride.

    For my cross country riding the standing is a much higher percentage.
    Downhill section - standing percentage 10%?
    Level section - standing 5%?
    Uphill section - standing 50-75%?

    Even in town when I ride I'm up and down in the saddle so saddle soreness isn't an issue with me.
    But then I haven't tried anything long distance on pavement yet either.

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  • JimT
    replied
    Originally posted by Setonix View Post
    Saturday when riding my Hatchet, I wanted to give it a try to stand up off the seat for 30-45 seconds. The first few tries I could barely hold 10 seconds, but nearing the end of the trip, I guess I had warmed up enough and was more stubborn, so held out the 45 seconds (counts). Right after it is very nice to be allowed to sit again.
    Then two questions come to mind. How long do you need to stand up to give your butt a rest? And what impact does riding with no weight on the saddle have on the maximum distance ability of the rider?

    For the first question, about 10 seconds seems to be long enough for me to get he blood flowing and a new lease on life.

    The second question, assuming that a rider can exert a certain amount of effort before their legs/body is "used up", it follows that keeping the time with all the weight on the pedals to an absolute minimum would be best. Taking this to the extreme, assume that a rider can do 100 miles before being fully spent when riding with full weight in the saddle and that same rider could ride maybe ride 5 or 10 miles before "using up" their legs with no weight on the saddle. If you ride with no weight on the saddle for 45 seconds every five minutes it seems like that extra effort would have an impact on the maximum distance.

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  • Setonix
    replied
    Saturday when riding my Hatchet, I wanted to give it a try to stand up off the seat for 30-45 seconds. The first few tries I could barely hold 10 seconds, but nearing the end of the trip, I guess I had warmed up enough and was more stubborn, so held out the 45 seconds (counts). Right after it is very nice to be allowed to sit again.

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  • JimT
    replied
    Originally posted by Setonix View Post
    Do you really stand on the pedals 30-45 seconds or do you push yourself off the seat with your hands? Your legs must be made of iron by now.
    ......
    Yes, I'd say Bungeejoe's legs are made of steel. He is one of only two unicycle riders that I know of that have completed over 200 miles (I322 Km) in one 24 hour period.

    On longer stretches between stops I stand up on pedals, but for only only a few seconds and that seems to do the trick.

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  • Setonix
    replied
    Originally posted by BHChieftain View Post
    Oh, also you mentioned where you look-- I was initially trying to look way out towards the horizon to avoid "looking down", but now I find the natural looking point for me is around 10' in front of the uni.

    Chief
    Yeah I also look at the ground in front of the uni at around that distance. You need to see what bumps to anticipate. Though occasionally I wonder how much my wheel wobbles and I look down straight at the wheel, but then I get confused and lose my balance.

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  • Quax1974
    replied
    Originally posted by BHChieftain View Post

    Somebody else mentioned that to get the weight on the saddle they focus less on actually trying to sit "more" on the saddle and instead they focus on less pressure on the pedals. That concept really helped me.

    Chief
    My tip getting weight in the saddle is to think of it as "lifting the knee" on the up-stroke.

    Although I now sit pretty much upright I definitely do not sit as Slamdance suggested: "Lean your upper body/shoulder back".

    Perhaps the pro freestyle riders do this but otherwise a slight forward lean (not hunch) is preferred.

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  • BHChieftain
    replied
    Originally posted by slamdance View Post
    To ride fully weighted: You must do a few new things:

    6.) Lean your upper body/shoulder back: Until you start feeling your whole body CG directly over the seat and the tire. Now, you feel like your on the middle of a teeter-totter.
    This is the phase I just entered. I am starting to get enough balance control where I can deal with the higher COG, and my hips are doing more of the corrections. When I get too far out of control, then bang! The weight goes back on the pedals until I can settle myself down...

    Originally posted by slamdance View Post
    7.) Now, change your pedaling action: What!!!!! ---
    a.) You must first learn to "lighten" the pedaling force.
    Somebody else mentioned that to get the weight on the saddle they focus less on actually trying to sit "more" on the saddle and instead they focus on less pressure on the pedals. That concept really helped me.

    Oh, also you mentioned where you look-- I was initially trying to look way out towards the horizon to avoid "looking down", but now I find the natural looking point for me is around 10' in front of the uni.

    Chief

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  • Setonix
    replied
    Originally posted by bungeejoe
    Yes, Iíll stand on the peddles out of the saddle 30 - 45 seconds every 5 minutes to let the blood flow. Then Iíll take all the weight off of the pedals for another 30 - 45 seconds to let the blood flow to the feet. Iíve learned to do these while pedaling at a 90 - 100 cadence.
    Do you really stand on the pedals 30-45 seconds or do you push yourself off the seat with your hands? Your legs must be made of iron by now.
    I don't stand up to let the blood flow after 5+ km or well when my crutch starts to feel numb, which can also be after 10km, but then it is always too late, because I don't manage to ride upright that long. That is also why I hang on the seat with my hands. Occasionally I make a jerky move and tumble off.

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  • johnfoss
    replied
    Bungeejoe, wow, wow and wow. Gems of inforfmation!
    Originally posted by bungeejoe
    Odd but now I never move my feet around anymore. ďFixedĒ to the pedals is even more efficient. Now, occasionally, Iíll ride 50 - 60 miles between dismounts.
    Wow #1. Though oddly, I am a little different on the foot movement. I always move my feet around a bit, but just as I'm getting going. Get the feet into the right positions, and they mostly stay there. Except if I need to shift (Schlumpf), or maybe reposition to go up something steep, for example. Otherwise, the feet stay put, and the 5.10s help them do that.
    óNo, I donít like the front of the saddle high. No, I donít use a handle bar. Yes, Iíll stand on the peddles out of the saddle 30 - 45 seconds every 5 minutes to let the blood flow. Then Iíll take all the weight off of the pedals for another 30 - 45 seconds to let the blood flow to the feet. Iíve learned to do these while pedaling at a 90 - 100 cadence.
    Wow # 2 and 3. That's gold. I have tried both of those circulation-enhancing things, but not really worked at it. This is a reminder to work on those techniques, because I do get the foot numbness (depends on the shoes), and of course the crotch needs help after a bunch of miles.
    I did my first unicycle century in my fourth year after learning to unicycle.
    Wow #4. I actually had a plan to try a century about 2.5 years after I learned to ride, but then I had to wait a year for Tom Miller to build my Big Wheel. By then, the century speed record had dropped from 10.5 hours down to 9:20, and I was intimidated. I set my attention on the short races, and didn't do a century until more than 31 years after I learned to ride, and had a 2-speed Road uni with a nice, cushy tire.

    Joe, please keep being an inspiration to us all!

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  • slamdance
    replied
    Riding Efficiency..get some coffee...this is long.

    Okay experts riders(90% of you guys...who learned by sitting straight up), this is where I concede and agree about the following:
    1.) Ride fully weighted on your seat.
    2.) Back straight.
    3.) Raise your seat.
    4.) Get shorter cranks.
    5.) Look at a distant object in front of you...Nah...bad idea...it ain't a bicycle and any bump/raised ground = UPD. Keep eyes down.

    It's curious most beginners(me included) at the earliest stage can barely do 50 ft. It feels like we just ran a 400 meters in 45 seconds, or did a hundred squat and our quads are pumped.
    Why? This is what we do:
    a.) Max weight on our pedals, both front and back(of course). So very little resting our butts on seat.
    b.) Hunch forwards and bob our upper body(maybe even swing arms).

    Yes, I "hear" everybody saying the total opposite, but guess what we tried that at first. No good. You do that=you fall=you can't ride.
    So a few of us are "stubborn/rebels/frustrated" enough to just do the total opposite. Then bingo. We got it!.
    Fact is this is how we "ride" the unicycle when we first "get it". So, thus the "extreme physical exertion".

    Anyways, so this is where I finally concede. Warning this is only for "intermediate" riders, if you haven't already figured it out...but this is advice for the "almost" there riders.
    So yes, follow those steps 1-4 above. So let's just do it you say?
    But....here's the kicker. It ain't easy.
    Do you remember high school physics? Action = reaction?

    To ride fully weighted: You must do a few new things:

    6.) Lean your upper body/shoulder back: Until you start feeling your whole body CG directly over the seat and the tire. Now, you feel like your on the middle of a teeter-totter. Ooops. Leaned back too far. Get back over. So, at this point because you have been leaning forwards(as you should during learning) it now feels like you are leaning/falling backwards. In actuality, you are straight up with slight forward angle, but it "don't feel that way", right? Anyways, now you must maintain this, but what happens if you need a quick forwards tilt? It's your hips. Buck em up. Yup, just like riding a mechanical bull. You've got to learn to use them with lightning quick timing and exact forward force plus retract back. A good way to know how this feels is to try to do some one foot or even no foot idling. Also, I'm sure you beginners have periodically inadvertantly "leaned back" or "bend your hips forwards", and what did you feel? It felt weightless, right? Then your pedals sped up..then =crash. Well that's what "fully weighted/seat" feels like.

    7.) Now, change your pedaling action: What!!!!! You finally learned to ride a unicycle, and a big key was fully weighting the pedals and now you tell me not to do this!!! Yup, here's why. Now, that you are sitting on a "pin point fulcrum" the slightest down force on each pedal = lateral rotation or wobbling. Just try it you'll see. What the heck? So what do I do. If you haven't figured it out, here it is:
    a.) You must first learn to "lighten" the pedaling force.
    b.) You must learn to "raise your knees" don't just let it come up to follow your pedal rotation. The knee adds weight to the pedals. You must activate your ab/core muscles to lift your whole leg during the highest point(apogee) of the pedal rotation.
    c.) You must learn to "push" the pedals "gently" forwards in a straight line. Easier said than done right? As your pedals are rotating, you must accurately delivery forward force at around 11 o'clock to 1 o'clock. If you do it too early or "dwell" too late, it translates to rotation or wobbling. Imagine yourself sitting on a pier at a lake, and there is a log under your feet. If you want to "make it roll" you don't stomp down on it, but rather lightly kick it forwards. That's exactly what it feels like, when you do it right.
    Last edited by slamdance; 2020-02-11, 06:11 AM. Reason: ..

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  • BHChieftain
    replied
    Well, tremendous progress over the past 2 weeks. Every day my distance increased, and today I made it a full block in my neighborhood which is about 1000í. I can really now feel the difference between weight on the pedals vs weight on the seat. I also am now able to adjust my foot pedal position at the 12:00 top stroke, that sure comes in handy...
    Chief

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