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  • Time to get to distance

    Hi,
    How long did it take folks here to make the transition from shorter runs with dismounts driven by fatigue to say a 1km continuous ride (not counting UPDs)?

    For you was it a gradual transition, or was it more like a plateau with a sudden breakthrough?

    I'm doing 30-45min sessions which consists of 200-500' run before leg fatigue forces me to dismount, followed by a few minutes of walking, then another 200-500' stint, etc. Feels like riding 1km is a long way off, but maybe its right around the corner?

    Chief

  • #2
    Maybe it's a seat-height adjustment away.
    -Greg Harper

    Nipples...do you ever have enough?

    Change is good. Bills are better.

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    • #3
      hi chief,

      i was kind of in your postion and found you just had to force yourself to do distances,i found a trading estate near me that was a straight line and a trip up and back was 1/2 mile so i aimed for 4 times to make me do 2 miles,to start with i found it hard going but just kept with it and it got easier,quicker and with longer runs without upd's and longer distances.

      i kept track of my times using map my tracks and looking back at them to help me with motorvation and for something to aim for. i am sort where i want to be with distances but want more off road pratice on my hatchet but weather is stopping me so i just learning idling currently.

      go for it as it does get easier!!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by BHChieftain View Post
        Hi,
        How long did it take folks here to make the transition from shorter runs with dismounts driven by fatigue to say a 1km continuous ride (not counting UPDs)?

        For you was it a gradual transition, or was it more like a plateau with a sudden breakthrough?

        I'm doing 30-45min sessions which consists of 200-500' run before leg fatigue forces me to dismount, followed by a few minutes of walking, then another 200-500' stint, etc. Feels like riding 1km is a long way off, but maybe its right around the corner?

        Chief
        As already said... change your saddle height... raise it to the top! When learning weight on the saddle is hard to achieve, but I did experience that a really high seat can make you always seated more or less. You'll be used to seat soon and than when lowering the saddlle to a best spot you'll find yourself always looking for that sweet feeling of moving without effort you experienced with high saddle
        Last edited by Vogelfrei80; 2020-01-29, 08:51 PM.

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        • #5
          I know seat adjustment can do wonders for leg fatigue but getting your weight in the seat will be the biggest help.
          in my case it was sort of quick but I was riding every morning before work about 45 min and then at lunch a lot of times. but I will say during that time I played with seat height and made sure it was as high on the nose as possible
          and when I did settle in to putting most of my weight in the seat it just flowed.
          I will add that right now I have shimmed the seats to lift the nose higher on all 3 of my unis and it has helped me with the distance riding
          like mOOns said find a distance to shoot for and go for it
          Last edited by aj1500; 2020-01-29, 09:02 PM.
          24" Torker LX
          29" UDC Trainer
          32" UDC trainer

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          • #6
            Seat height and getting the weight in the saddle is a big part of the equation. The other part is simply increasing your leg strength. Even relatively fit people that start unicycling do have to develop their leg muscles (mostly quads) for longer distances. When I started road riding I could go about a mile before leg fatigue kicked in and I started to wonder how I was going to dismount without crashing.

            It took me about 8 months of training before I could do 15 miles in one setting and do a 50 mile day. A lot of that training was up and down a short 12% grade before I started putting more open road miles in.

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            • #7
              Hi,
              I have already maxed out the seat height. My knee is *barely* bent. I know the issue is being able to relax and get the weight on the seat, I am getting a bit better at that every day-- ironically, as my legs get really tired by the end of my workout, I'm able to sit on the seat more and get the longest distance on my runs!

              I'm just wondering if the clickover to constant weight on the seat generally just improves slowly over time, or one day it just clicks all of the sudden.

              Chief

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              • #8
                Leg fatigue has not been a limiting factor of any of my rides, even as a beginner. I would get sore back muscles as a beginner from going around my block a few times, but not leg soreness. And the back soreness wouldn't stop me.

                As soon as I started wanting to ride to the train station to go to work, I could do it. I was actually choosing to take a longer route because I was a bit unsure of a hill on the shorter more direct route. (One day a couple of weeks later I tried the hill and I worked out it wasn't that bad so after that, I stuck to the shorter route).

                For the back pain: After a couple of consecutive days of distance riding on a 36er, I worked out I could eliminate all back pain if I ride with 2 hands on the handles.
                Last edited by Gockie; 2020-01-30, 01:25 AM.
                If you are female please join the Female Unicyclists! group on Facebook!

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                • #9
                  BHC... you're almost there.

                  It (legs, lungs, and skills) improves over time but I bet you are due real soon for a big jump in distance if you keep it up.

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                  • #10
                    It took me about 6 weeks of riding 1-2 hours a day to ride the 1/4 mile loop around my neighborhood (with a small incline/decline section) without dismount. By week 7-8, I could ride more than 1 mile without dismounting. So, my progression was somewhat geometric.

                    Practicing is making you stronger, for sure. But the secret to distance, I think, is to keep yourself from crossing a certain threshold of effort. When you cross that threshold, you get worn out, and you lose control. At a certain point, you'll start exerting less than that threshold, and then your distance will go crazy nuts.

                    In the meantime, try not to stress out whether your next run is going to be your longest. You may end up using more energy that way. Though my memory is fuzzy on this point, for me the real distances corresponded with riding a bit more slowly. You might try that.

                    You will eventually get around to putting more weight in the seat. There has been some disagreement on the forums about how important this is for beginners. My attitude is that it will come eventually. I suggest the following mantra: "Lazy ass, lazy ass, lazy ass..." Eventually your ass will believe it is lazy and settle into the seat.

                    You're making great progress, Chief!

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                    • #11
                      Thanks for the comments everybody, I appreciate it. One thing I do notice is sometimes when my legs start to really burn-- if I am able to settle in the seat just for a bit, then my legs instantly feel better and recover even while I'm pedaling. But I can't hold that balance for very long and then I start putting more weight back on the pedals. But at least I'm not falling over now!

                      Chief

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BHChieftain View Post
                        ..... I'm just wondering if the clickover to constant weight on the seat generally just improves slowly over time, or one day it just clicks all of the sudden.

                        Chief
                        I'd say like most things with the unicycle that "slowly improves over time" would be normal. Its takes time to burn in your muscle memory so that things just happen with very little thought and no conscience effort.

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                        • #13
                          My first successful ride to work 2.5KM was 3 months after I started learning to unicycle. It was then 4 months after starting when I did my longest ride over the Ted Smout Memorial Bridge and back (3rd longest bridge in Australia) and that was on a 20" which I don't recommend. If you're going to ride distance around where you live you may want to learn a few skills before going on long rides.

                          Learning how to handle transitions is very important as when you're riding you won't have the luxury of riding the same surface everywhere. Example learn how to stay on the uni when you ride from concrete to grass. Or when riding down little dips from the footpaths to cross the road. Riding off curbs can be handy but it's very hard to learn initially and you can mostly avoid riding off curbs.

                          Try and learn how to handle changes in elevation, can you handle your uni going downhill/uphill? Can you mount downhill/uphill when you need to? You also need to learn how to stop instantly when you need to and how much space you need to do such a thing.
                          DRS 5'20" Giraffe || Nimbus II 24" || Nimbus Muni 29" || Kris Holm 36" Road

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                          • #14
                            I don't know about the seat height. Even with a high seat, when ur new to unicycling you still stand on the pedals more than you sit and naturally your legs have to get used to riding. I remember when doing the first 100 metres and my legs were killing me, but being able to ride 100 metres stimulated me in trying more and more and more and gradually I got stronger and better.
                            I would argue that sitting up straight on the unicycle and naturally feeling that you actually sit on the seat instead of stand on the pedals, will speed up the process, but you just need to keep at it.
                            This part is not what takes the most time. Once you can do 2km you can do 4km and riding 15 miles to me sounds like a very long ride. I generally ride 10-20km, which is fine for me. For me it is not leg soreness with distance, but saddle soreness.
                            So Big Chieftan, like peeps say, you are nearly there, just keep at it.

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                            • #15
                              Gockie..you ride a 36er...dang...pretty good..how tall are you? is dismounting scary?

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