Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Time to get to distance

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by scotty watty View Post
    Gockie..you ride a 36er...dang...pretty good..how tall are you? is dismounting scary?
    Dismounting a 36er is fine! It's the mounting I can't do (except if I tyre grab)...
    I also just started riding 5 foot giraffes.... riding that is a bit freaky.

    I'm 166cm tall, with 77cm inseam and I have issues with the KH36 in that my legs only just reach with 150 cranks with the seat right down, so 125mm cranks work for me on that uni.
    If you are female please join the Female Unicyclists! group on Facebook!

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by scotty watty View Post
      Gockie..you ride a 36er...dang...pretty good..how tall are you? is dismounting scary?
      36" dismounting is fine but you need to be careful when at speed or going downhill, I think I got a slight ankle sprain going down an extremely steep dip I leaned back into the slope and came down fast. Brakes help you dismount more gracefully and slowly.

      Originally posted by Gockie View Post
      Dismounting a 36er is fine! It's the mounting I can't do (except if I tyre grab)...
      I also just started riding 5 foot giraffes.... riding that is a bit freaky.

      I'm 166cm tall, with 77cm inseam and I have issues with the KH36 in that my legs only just reach with 150 cranks with the seat right down, so 125mm cranks work for me on that uni.
      It's all in the rolling mount, is your giraffe getting a lot of use? Can you mount it solo or do you need a friend to hold it every time?
      Last edited by Unigan; 2020-01-30, 07:33 AM.
      DRS 5'20" Giraffe || Nimbus II 24" || Nimbus Muni 29" || Kris Holm 36" Road

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by scotty watty View Post
        Gockie..you ride a 36er...dang...pretty good..how tall are you? is dismounting scary?
        if you think dismount is scary, bring a pillow and throw it in front of you before you land. Might also be good advice for when you UPD :P

        Comment


        • #19
          My big leap forwards was buying the QuAx Luxus 20. It replaced the unbranded 20 I started with, which had way too short a seat post and a way too small a saddle. (The QuAx also had a better tyre but I literally wore that down to the canvas in two weeks.)

          Suddenly I went from doing tens of metres, to hundreds of meters, then to kilometres within a month. Like the rainy night riding finally clicked for me in my front yard, every time I made an advance it spurred my enthusiasm so I tended to ride even more and make big leaps quite quickly.

          I took to sitting down quite easily because I was learning under the instruction to sit up very straight with weight on the seat. I now know that those instructions also made it harder for me to get riding but it meant I had good technique when I did finally get going.

          It is important to realise that learning to ride a unicycle is a journey rather than a goal. It doesn't matter how long you take to learn or what you learn first. (Some people start by leaning to mount into a still stand.) Every kind of learning experience helps build a part of the incredibly complex neural network the rider builds in their brain.

          It was the same when I learnt entirely on grass until I could ride ten metres. Sure made it hard to learn but when I went out the front gate I was well prepared for the irregularities of old concrete paths because I understood weight distribution between feet and backside.

          But if you find yourself riding around standing, just enjoy the workout. It will make you a stronger rider very quickly. That strength provides the power required to easily adjust very rapidly, which in turn improves the balance performance. You can more easily accelerate out of trouble. Better balance makes it easier to sit down. Problem solved.

          There is no bad way to learn if you get there. Fortunately most riders gravitate (quite literally) into sitting because their legs demand it. Unicycles are so unstable that riders either develop good technique or eventually give up.

          The central solution to riding well is to just keep riding. You will achieve unexpected levels of skill that you had not initially imagined, a lot sooner than you ever expected. That stage of learning is really fun.
          Triton 36" + 29" | KH 29" | KH 26" | KH 27.5" Muni | Nimbus eSport Race 24" | Torker LX 24" | Qu-Ax Luxus 20" | Qu-Ax Profi 20" | KH / Impact 19" hybrid

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by JimT View Post
            I'd say like most things with the unicycle that "slowly improves over time" would be normal. Its takes time to burn in your muscle memory so that things just happen with very little thought and no conscience effort.
            That's how I see this too. Time and practice. No secret tricks, no easy ways.

            It's just about getting the muscles to work where they haven't had to before. Strong bicycle riders may struggle with distance on a unicycle, different muscles used differently. I think nothing of doing 50-60km rides over 3 to 4 hours. I recently bought a road bike (you know "joined the dark side") thinking longer rides would be a cinch. No way, I'm struggling to do half the distance I do on a unicycle, and not much faster at that.

            Find out what wears you out and do more of it. Quads are the main strength muscles, if you want better hills you will need those stronger. Squats can help there, but it's not just strength it's also control, squats don't help with that only real world practice.

            It's not just strength. Unicycle riding is a faster cadence for longer, that can also be tiring and is only resolved with time and effort.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Unigan View Post
              36" dismounting is fine but you need to be careful when at speed or going downhill, I think I got a slight ankle sprain going down an extremely steep dip I leaned back into the slope and came down fast. Brakes help you dismount more gracefully and slowly.



              It's all in the rolling mount, is your giraffe getting a lot of use? Can you mount it solo or do you need a friend to hold it every time?
              Giraffe- only riding at netball courts.... last time was December!
              And yay!!! Did my first 36er freemount with handlebars attached tonight!!! It was downhill though....


              Originally posted by OneTrackMind View Post
              My big leap forwards was buying the QuAx Luxus 20. It replaced the unbranded 20 I started with, which had way too short a seat post and a way too small a saddle. (The QuAx also had a better tyre but I literally wore that down to the canvas in two weeks.)

              Suddenly I went from doing tens of metres, to hundreds of meters, then to kilometres within a month. Like the rainy night riding finally clicked for me in my front yard, every time I made an advance it spurred my enthusiasm so I tended to ride even more and make big leaps quite quickly.

              I took to sitting down quite easily because I was learning under the instruction to sit up very straight with weight on the seat. I now know that those instructions also made it harder for me to get riding but it meant I had good technique when I did finally get going.

              It is important to realise that learning to ride a unicycle is a journey rather than a goal. It doesn't matter how long you take to learn or what you learn first. (Some people start by leaning to mount into a still stand.) Every kind of learning experience helps build a part of the incredibly complex neural network the rider builds in their brain.

              It was the same when I learnt entirely on grass until I could ride ten metres. Sure made it hard to learn but when I went out the front gate I was well prepared for the irregularities of old concrete paths because I understood weight distribution between feet and backside.

              But if you find yourself riding around standing, just enjoy the workout. It will make you a stronger rider very quickly. That strength provides the power required to easily adjust very rapidly, which in turn improves the balance performance. You can more easily accelerate out of trouble. Better balance makes it easier to sit down. Problem solved.

              There is no bad way to learn if you get there. Fortunately most riders gravitate (quite literally) into sitting because their legs demand it. Unicycles are so unstable that riders either develop good technique or eventually give up.

              The central solution to riding well is to just keep riding. You will achieve unexpected levels of skill that you had not initially imagined, a lot sooner than you ever expected. That stage of learning is really fun.
              Nice post! And btw, I think being able to still stand for any period of time would be great for everything uni related.

              Originally posted by BruceC View Post
              That's how I see this too. Time and practice. No secret tricks, no easy ways.

              It's just about getting the muscles to work where they haven't had to before. Strong bicycle riders may struggle with distance on a unicycle, different muscles used differently. I think nothing of doing 50-60km rides over 3 to 4 hours. I recently bought a road bike (you know "joined the dark side") thinking longer rides would be a cinch. No way, I'm struggling to do half the distance I do on a unicycle, and not much faster at that.

              Find out what wears you out and do more of it. Quads are the main strength muscles, if you want better hills you will need those stronger. Squats can help there, but it's not just strength it's also control, squats don't help with that only real world practice.

              It's not just strength. Unicycle riding is a faster cadence for longer, that can also be tiring and is only resolved with time and effort.
              Maybe we should try a b*ke ride together. You can't really be serious saying a b*ke is harder? Maybe it's the b*ke... I had a Kmart one and it was cr*p.
              Last edited by Gockie; 2020-01-30, 08:27 AM.
              If you are female please join the Female Unicyclists! group on Facebook!

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Gockie View Post
                I think being able to still stand for any period of time would be great for everything uni related.
                Still standing to some extent came for me in places where I rode slowly, particularly up hills. I would adjust my balance in a series of ever slower near still stands. I'm still not great at actual still stands but I learnt enough for my needs.

                The skills we learn as we go often depend on our local terrain and ambition. One could not go far in my suburb with out encountering hills. When learning, I took them on in order of challenge until I could ride them all. Someone with good trails nearby will probably learn to muni.
                Triton 36" + 29" | KH 29" | KH 26" | KH 27.5" Muni | Nimbus eSport Race 24" | Torker LX 24" | Qu-Ax Luxus 20" | Qu-Ax Profi 20" | KH / Impact 19" hybrid

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by OneTrackMind View Post
                  Still standing to some extent came for me in places where I rode slowly, particularly up hills. I would adjust my balance in a series of ever slower near still stands. I'm still not great at actual still stands but I learnt enough for my needs.

                  The skills we learn as we go often depend on our local terrain and ambition. One could not go far in my suburb with out encountering hills. When learning, I took them on in order of challenge until I could ride them all. Someone with good trails nearby will probably learn to muni.
                  For me, riding slowly is important for when I get to traffic intersections. I like to not have to dismount

                  Im working on the muni-ing now, cause I just got my first suitable muni a couple of weeks ago, and just near me is National Park fire trail.

                  I would love to do more 36er riding but theres too much stop-start needed on anywhere local near me.
                  Damn Sydney.
                  If you are female please join the Female Unicyclists! group on Facebook!

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by BHChieftain View Post
                    Thanks for the comments everybody, I appreciate it. One thing I do notice is sometimes when my legs start to really burn-- if I am able to settle in the seat just for a bit, then my legs instantly feel better and recover even while I'm pedaling.
                    I learned to unicycle as a kid have used a unicycle on and off for years but I never really did any proper distance.

                    When first I started to commute to work (only 5-6km away, but hilly) my legs used to be really sore pretty much every day. I don't know when that stopped but at some point I stopped thinking about it and I can't recall the last time it was a problem.

                    I am aware that I sit more firmly down that I used to but I don't think that is the only reason as I do stand a little as I go up steep hills. So I presume it is a combination of more muscle strength and better technique (i.e. sitting).

                    My only advice would be to not worry about it. Do what you do, for as far as it feels fun, and at some point it will stop being so tiring.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Gockie View Post
                      Maybe we should try a b*ke ride together. You can't really be serious saying a b*ke is harder? Maybe it's the b*ke... I had a Kmart one and it was cr*p.
                      You may have missed the point, different activity is different muscles and technique and so we are less efficient, hence the need for time and practice.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Gockie View Post
                        Maybe we should try a b*ke ride together. You can't really be serious saying a b*ke is harder? Maybe it's the b*ke... I had a Kmart one and it was cr*p.
                        Yeah I agree. Two weeks ago they closed off part of the highway, so every day to work and back home has long traffic jams. Taking a bike is faster than taking the car now. I only have 7km. As I don't bother about lights on the back of my uni and helmet because it is still dark in the morning, I take a bike and my unicycling surely paid off. Now I can ride much faster than I ever could, even with strong wind and some uphills I have along the way.
                        Sometimes I ride to work by uni, but with 10+C I get all sweaty and there is not shower in the office. Beside that there are lots of cyclists here that don't all take care I only ride one wheel. So it is safer to either ride very early or just take a bike.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by BHChieftain View Post
                          I'm doing 30-45min sessions which consists of 200-500' run before leg fatigue forces me to dismount
                          When my center of balance is in front of the unicycle (frame tipped forward) each peddle turn pushes the seat forward and toward my body/seat. It feels like being pushed and you're nearly falling off the front. This does not fatigue my legs.

                          When my center of balance is behind the unicycle (frame tipped back) each peddle turn had me gripping the seat hard between with my legs because it was travelling away from me. This burns my legs but provides a lot of control.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by BHChieftain View Post
                            Hi,
                            How long did it take folks here to make the transition from shorter runs with dismounts driven by fatigue to say a 1km continuous ride (not counting UPDs)?

                            For you was it a gradual transition, or was it more like a plateau with a sudden breakthrough?
                            I learned to "really" ride at 17. On a Schwinn Giraffe. Long story, which can be found here somewhere so I'm not going to repeat that. I made my "breakthrough", which was riding the giraffe from the hood of the car parked on the street, up the driveway and to the basketball hoop on the backyard garage.

                            About a week after that, Bradley Bradley and I headed out on a 12+ mile round trip adventure. Which was really stupid. Neither of us could freemount the giraffe, and neither of our crotches were equipped for such a test of endurance. We're talking 1970s Schwinn seats. But we were teenagers so none of that mattered.

                            I have no recollection of how long it took to get to our destination, which was about 6 miles away, but our crotches were done. Ever experienced that painful, burning urination thing from unicycling? That. But we spent some time there, and it was dark by the time we were headed home. Our crotches were very not into any more riding.

                            By a total fluke of coincidence, my brother was driving by, on a road he didn't usually go on, and picked us up. End of ride.

                            Was that helpful? Probably not. We were both too teenager-y to pay attention to our legs apparently, and rode until we basically couldn't anymore. This work differently when you learn pas the age of 30 or so...
                            Last edited by johnfoss; 2020-02-01, 12:28 AM.
                            John Foss
                            www.unicycling.com

                            "Who is going to argue with a mom who can ride a unicycle?" -- Forums member "HiMo"

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by dpn81 View Post
                              When my center of balance is in front of the unicycle (frame tipped forward) each peddle turn pushes the seat forward and toward my body/seat. It feels like being pushed and you're nearly falling off the front. This does not fatigue my legs.
                              These observations are impressions as a rider rather than an outside observer. The reality is the frame is virtually always leaning back. (It can reach a steady vertical doing freestyle moves.)

                              Centre of mass being in front is only sustainable during acceleration. In a steady state your centre of mass is directly above the contact point of the tyre on the road.

                              Otherwise, leaning the frame forwards would require you to be leaning your body backwards and it would be incredibly unstable.

                              If you doubt what I am saying, get someone to take a photo from the side while you are riding.

                              When my center of balance is behind the unicycle (frame tipped back) each peddle turn had me gripping the seat hard between with my legs because it was travelling away from me. This burns my legs but provides a lot of control.
                              Although your centre of mass is not actually behind the contact point you can certainly lean the uni back a long way. You are reaching the limits when you have to hold the seat to stop it dropping out.

                              As you noted this geometry enhances stability. This is because the window of stability becomes wider. As it does with more rake on the head tube of a bicycle, the stability is traded off against steering responsiveness. You can't turn as tightly.
                              Triton 36" + 29" | KH 29" | KH 26" | KH 27.5" Muni | Nimbus eSport Race 24" | Torker LX 24" | Qu-Ax Luxus 20" | Qu-Ax Profi 20" | KH / Impact 19" hybrid

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by johnfoss View Post
                                I learned to "really" ride at 17. On a Schwinn Giraffe. Long story, which can be found here somewhere so I'm not going to repeat that. I made my "breakthrough", which was riding the giraffe from the hood of the car parked on the street, up the driveway and to the basketball hoop on the backyard garage.

                                About a week after that, Bradley Bradley and I headed out on a 12+ mile round trip adventure. Which was really stupid. Neither of us could freemount the giraffe, and neither of our crotches were equipped for such a test of endurance. We're talking 1970s Schwinn seats. But we were teenagers so none of that mattered.

                                I have no recollection of how long it took to get to our destination, which was about 6 miles away, but our crotches were done. Ever experienced that painful, burning urination thing from unicycling? That. But we spent some time there, and it was dark by the time we were headed home. Our crotches were very not into any more riding.

                                By a total fluke of coincidence, my brother was driving by, on a road he didn't usually go on, and picked us up. End of ride.

                                Was that helpful? Probably not. We were both too teenager-y to pay attention to our legs apparently, and rode until we basically couldn't anymore. This work differently when you learn pas the age of 30 or so...
                                Great story!

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X