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  • lightbulbjim
    replied
    Originally posted by Setonix View Post
    My wife and I want to get kids, but we've had trouble from my side and my wife blames the unicycles. Yesterday she asked me not to ride until we have a baby.
    You'll just have to replace your unicycle time with... some other form of exercise which is conducive to producing children

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  • Setonix
    replied
    Originally posted by lowerstackmac View Post

    The nearest paved road from me is a kilometre away and it is about 20 km long. It’s hilly for the entire length. Most of the hills are gradual inclines with one long steep three km section. The traffic on it is very low, sometimes while riding I won’t see any vehicles. I can only go about three kilometres before I am soaked and breathing very hard. I find the 26 muni to be a very strenuous cardio workout. I expect one day I’ll be able to do the entire length with more efficiency and less sweat. I’m very impressed with how far some of you folks can effortlessly ride
    Yeah just keep at it. The 26 muni gives more friction on paved road, because of the mountainbike tire. There will be less friction with a road tire, though my KH26 was my second unicycle after I figured out it was what I wanted to spend all my time in. Then very quickly, I could ride more and more kilometres with it. just at first I had some trouble mounting it, but it is nice for making some distance and going exploring. I learned unicycling when I still lived in Denmark and where I lived it was also quite hilly. Balancing uphill is easier I think than going downhill, especially when it gets steeper.
    My wife and I want to get kids, but we've had trouble from my side and my wife blames the unicycles. Yesterday she asked me not to ride until we have a baby. I don't want to put our marriage at risk so I agreed for now, but I was not happy. There is no proof scientifically it has negative effects on fertility, but tell a woman that when she is 100% certain of it in her mind.
    Since I hate running or any other sports, I've been thinking that surely I can spend some time on the ultimate wheel again. Unless I slip off and fall straight down, I reckon it is the only safe way to still be able to unicycle, just without a seat

    Leave a comment:


  • lowerstackmac
    replied
    Originally posted by lightbulbjim View Post

    I find that my heartrate is often higher on my 36er (gets most of my riding time so I'm most familier with it) compared to my (road) bike for a given level of perceived effort. I find that during a moderate effort ride I'm usually in zone 2-3 on my bike and zone 3-4 on my 36er (five zone system). That's at an effort which feels active but not particularly strenuous, and I could comfortably sustain it for several hours.

    Sustained climbing is a different story of course and I can easily push myself into bonking territory on the uni unless I pay attention. On the bike I have much lower gearing available.

    That said, if I wanted to focus on weight loss then I would probably run. That feels much more energy sapping to me compared to cycling, although maybe it's just because I do very little of it...
    The nearest paved road from me is a kilometre away and it is about 20 km long. It’s hilly for the entire length. Most of the hills are gradual inclines with one long steep three km section. The traffic on it is very low, sometimes while riding I won’t see any vehicles. I can only go about three kilometres before I am soaked and breathing very hard. I find the 26 muni to be a very strenuous cardio workout. I expect one day I’ll be able to do the entire length with more efficiency and less sweat. I’m very impressed with how far some of you folks can effortlessly ride

    Leave a comment:


  • lightbulbjim
    replied
    Originally posted by finnspin View Post
    I feel like it's virtually impossible to get my heartrate up to a good training level on a unicycle on flat ground
    I find that my heartrate is often higher on my 36er (gets most of my riding time so I'm most familier with it) compared to my (road) bike for a given level of perceived effort. I find that during a moderate effort ride I'm usually in zone 2-3 on my bike and zone 3-4 on my 36er (five zone system). That's at an effort which feels active but not particularly strenuous, and I could comfortably sustain it for several hours.

    Sustained climbing is a different story of course and I can easily push myself into bonking territory on the uni unless I pay attention. On the bike I have much lower gearing available.

    That said, if I wanted to focus on weight loss then I would probably run. That feels much more energy sapping to me compared to cycling, although maybe it's just because I do very little of it...

    Leave a comment:


  • Setonix
    replied
    Originally posted by BruceC View Post
    As for cheating on a 36", I rode mine yesterday for the first time in months, and I was wasted after just a few km's. Big does not mean easy!
    All week I've been riding my 24" and I come back home all sweaty (8-15km, whatever I felt like along the way). Today I chose the KH26 municycle. Somehow it was heavier, because the mountainbike wheel creates more friction. Also when turning sharper turns the friction makes it harder and I tumbled off a few times, but all in all I didn't sweat so much as I came home. Last few weeks I've also been riding the 36", which mostly is hard when mounting, which I can't do in the first go and riding uphill is naturally heavier than doing so with a smaller wheel.


    Originally posted by finnspin View Post
    I've been looking at heart rate monitor watches recently, would be interesting to compare how strenuous unicycling, running or riding a bike is.
    I'm certain that running gives a higher hart rate than unicycling as with unicycling you're also limited by having to stay in balance and well, ur just sitting. You have to put in more kilometres to burn the same number of calories no doubt. Then again I hate running. It is boring and all the while I'm annoyed I didn't bring my uni. Every now and then I do go for a run. Running also targets different muscles which give me muscle ache for a few days when I run so little as I do.

    Originally posted by Gockie View Post
    But how often do you find yourself in a space you can ride as fast as you want for a long distance safely? There's usually kids, dogs, cyclists, cars, pedestrians, traffic intersections around
    I think we just don't push ourselves to our cardio limits a lot of the time on a uni.
    I live just 100 metres from a park and in the Netherlands there are bicycle paths everywhere, so no cars to deal with. Somewhat outside of the path towards the river, the bike paths are near empty. I can easily ride 12km without having to cross heavy traffic intersections. At the river there are some peeps walking their dogs, but they have to keep them on a leash I believe. They don't bother me at least. The other place I ride in the forest, just a 15min drive north from where I live also has long bicycle paths and the only nuisance is road riders and mountainbikers who think I will fall off so they make me well aware they want to overtake me.
    As for pushing our cardio limits, with the having to keep balance it makes it a bit difficult. I compare my riding the 24" with spinning at the fitness centre. On a spinning machine, you don't have to worry about keeping your balance and you can put all energy into pedalling. With uni if you go too fast the wheel starts bouncing or the spin goes out of control and lands you in a UPD

    Leave a comment:


  • Gockie
    replied
    Originally posted by finnspin View Post
    I hate unicycling for cardio, since there aren't any good sized hills around where I live. I feel like it's virtually impossible to get my heartrate up to a good training level on a unicycle on flat ground, since the limit is always how fast I can pedal. A smaller wheel only makes that worse, I'd personally choose the bigger wheel and go further instead. I've been running quite a lot for exercise, less efficient way of moving - more effective way to train is the logic. I have no objective way to measure, but subjectively I'm pretty sure my improvements in running translate over to endurance when riding too. The muscles are slightly different, but overall cardio is more my weakness.

    I've been looking at heart rate monitor watches recently, would be interesting to compare how strenuous unicycling, running or riding a bike is.
    A fitbit fits the bill

    I can really get my heart going in just 2 or 3 minutes of hill running. With my usual fitness I can steadily ride a unicycle for kilometres on flat terrain and I mentally I don't regard it as a cardio exercise. But, if I try to ride as fast as I can for say 400m on a 24" "I'm in a race", then by the end of it I find it's a great workout. But how often do you find yourself in a space you can ride as fast as you want for a long distance safely? There's usually kids, dogs, cyclists, cars, pedestrians, traffic intersections around


    I think we just don't push ourselves to our cardio limits a lot of the time on a uni.

    Leave a comment:


  • finnspin
    replied
    I hate unicycling for cardio, since there aren't any good sized hills around where I live. I feel like it's virtually impossible to get my heartrate up to a good training level on a unicycle on flat ground, since the limit is always how fast I can pedal. A smaller wheel only makes that worse, I'd personally choose the bigger wheel and go further instead. I've been running quite a lot for exercise, less efficient way of moving - more effective way to train is the logic. I have no objective way to measure, but subjectively I'm pretty sure my improvements in running translate over to endurance when riding too. The muscles are slightly different, but overall cardio is more my weakness.

    I've been looking at heart rate monitor watches recently, would be interesting to compare how strenuous unicycling, running or riding a bike is.

    Leave a comment:


  • finnspin
    replied
    I hate unicycling for cardio, since there aren't any good sized hills around where I live. I feel like it's virtually impossible to get my heartrate up to a good training level on a unicycle on flat ground, since the limit is always how fast I can pedal. A smaller wheel only makes that worse, I'd personally choose the bigger wheel and go further instead. I've been running quite a lot for exercise, less efficient way of moving - more effective way to train is the logic. I have no objective way to measure, but subjectively I'm pretty sure my improvements in running translate over to endurance when riding too. The muscles are slightly different, but overall cardio is more my weakness.

    I've been looking at heart rate monitor watches recently, would be interesting to compare how strenuous unicycling, running or riding a bike is.

    Leave a comment:


  • BruceC
    replied
    Originally posted by Setonix View Post
    My wife and daughter keep bugging me about my belly and that I have to lose weight. But my wife doesn't believe I can lose weight by unicycling, which I do once a week. I want to prove her wrong, as in my mind the main reason for fattening up is because I love cookies and candy, which I eat all the time. So the past 3 days I've been riding 10kms every evening on a 24" uni. I figured that more rotations is better than fewer rotations, so I won't cheat by taking the 36". Today I even rode 15-16 km. .
    After I started uni riding more seriously, I lost over 10 kg in about 12 months. And have kept that off for years, although now riding less than I used to, about 60-70 km a week, so have to be careful. My vice is cheese and wine, and after a good ride I feel no guilt in indulging. As for cheating on a 36", I rode mine yesterday for the first time in months, and I was wasted after just a few km's. Big does not mean easy!

    Leave a comment:


  • m00ms
    replied
    Hi Gockie sorry to hear about your ankle which i hope heals soon as well.

    I brought a 6ft giraffee a while back which i have not ridden yet as when i first got it here in the uk we had what felt like forever rain and wet ground then with the current covid issues the last thing i want to do is be a burden on the NHS who certainly have there hands full currently.

    Leave a comment:


  • Setonix
    replied
    My wife and daughter keep bugging me about my belly and that I have to lose weight. But my wife doesn't believe I can lose weight by unicycling, which I do once a week. I want to prove her wrong, as in my mind the main reason for fattening up is because I love cookies and candy, which I eat all the time. So the past 3 days I've been riding 10kms every evening on a 24" uni. I figured that more rotations is better than fewer rotations, so I won't cheat by taking the 36". Today I even rode 15-16 km. I read on here that people are more likely to give negative remarks when riding a 20 and 24" uni, but I had some very positive remarks, like people honking and saying "quite the achievement" and a girl starting a conversation while riding on her bike next to me. Sure there was a kid that asked if I train in the circus, so I said I wasn't good enough for that. Also told them I didn't have the money for a whole bike.
    It is a Quax 24" road uni, which is actually quite nice. It doesn't give me sore knees, like when I rode 10km on a trials uni.

    Leave a comment:


  • aj1500
    replied
    Gockie... like Ruari said,, Ouch
    be careful on that ankle while It's healing don't want to reinjure it.

    Leave a comment:


  • ruari
    replied
    Gockie... ouch! I have been thinking how nice it would be to try UniMyra's giraffe (he has offered) but your accident does make it less tempting. Nonetheless I am already cycling around on a pretty tall penny-farthing (when I am not unicycling) on hilly terrain, so it is not like I am totally avoiding risk in any case.

    I hope you feel 100% soon and can enjoy your 36" outside again. Look after yourself.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gockie
    replied
    First real attempts at mounting the 36er after surgery in Feb. Ok, it was inside my home between my dining area and kitchen bench, and not on the open street. However, there may be some actual improvement in that skill compared to my last attempts (pre ankle surgery*)

    I have to try this on the street. A bit scared of reinjuring something though. I’m not even sure in dismounting the 36er either now, whereas I had no worries about it before.

    * Injury came from a bad dismount of the giraffe, it was good except I ended up rolling my ankle when it met the ground.

    Leave a comment:


  • aj1500
    replied
    finnspin
    very cool vid, I don't think I'll ever hit that level but I sure enjoy watching others that can

    so I got my first official road ride on the new Lite tire and I am very happy with it. as I thought from my first ride at the park it is very rider friendly compared the original tire. I can't say I was able to duplicate my new top speed. I am going to have to get used to it as it is a bit squirrely,, as in it responds quick to inputs rather than being sluggish. I'm sure this is due to both the lighter weight and it is more rounded. I did manage to hit a new record for riding distance before dismount. I was able to go 8.5 miles, I could have gone more but it was hot and I wanted to stop and have a drink.

    Leave a comment:

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