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  • #91
    Agreed, I made that mistake... soon after I could ride-ish I rode only off road for a solid year if not more. And it engrained all the bad habits so hard (weight not fully in the saddle, balance corrections with the upper body, back pedal pressure because riding behind the wheel and so on) that years later I still struggle when riding on the road.

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    • #92
      Originally posted by finnspin View Post
      Also guys, what's up with the "You should do Muni!" under every beginner post in this forum recently? Even if people have a very clear idea of what they want to do, it seems that someone is always trying to convince them that they should ride Muni instead, a bit odd I think..
      ...which begs the question, "Do beginners have a very clear idea of what they want to do?"

      The first time I rode off-road, down a hill near my house, I felt it was the most awesome thing ever. I did not know I'd feel that way prior to riding down the hill...just to answer the question What's up with the "You should do Muni!"...?

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      • #93
        Originally posted by Gockie View Post
        Yeah, my opinion, leave muni till you can ride a uni with a hand on your handle the whole time, when you see rocks/tree roots etc, you must keep your hand on the sandle. You also want to have a decent ability to maneuver your uni. Muni is mentally and physically taxing and I think beginners shouldn't worry about tackling bumpy muni paths till they are proficient with smooth paths and can make all the turns they want while keeping a hand on the handle.
        There is muni and there is off-road riding. My second uni was a KH26 muni and I very quickly took it to the forest. Because of all the pits and bumps I believe I learned to keep my balance quicker, even though I didn't at first have one hand on the seat. At some stage I felt like riding on sandy roads was easier than riding with the muni on paved roads, because there is more friction, especially when turning. Turning in sand is easier. Nowadays I like a mix of paved and sandy roads and do keep one hand in the air when off-road. So I'd say, let beginners do what they like when they feel they are ready.

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        • #94
          I'll be done with school in about 1.5 more years, at which point I'll have more free time--I live near the Santa Cruz mountains in California and we have awesome trails around here in the redwood forests, so I will try muni then.

          But first I'll start with the road/bikepath riding. My goal is to upgrade to a bigger wheel by this summer. Strongly considering a 32...

          Chief

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          • #95
            Originally posted by BHChieftain View Post
            I'll be done with school in about 1.5 more years, at which point I'll have more free time--I live near the Santa Cruz mountains in California and we have awesome trails around here in the redwood forests, so I will try muni then.

            But first I'll start with the road/bikepath riding. My goal is to upgrade to a bigger wheel by this summer. Strongly considering a 32...

            Chief
            I'm just going to say it...I think your second unicycle should be a muni. I don't think 1.5 years of road riding is going to prepare you for muni. What will help is to start riding on uneven and resistant surfaces. I bought a "road" unicycle somewhat early-on, during the period when I was still fascinated my riding long distances. After spending time with the road unicycle, I found road riding to be a mixture of fear and boredom. I ended up converting my road unicycle to a 29" muni. Like you, Chief, I live next to awesome trails.

            IM(somewhat less than)HO, here's the correct order for your unicycles:

            #1: what you have
            #2: 27.5" muni
            #3: a nice trials/street unicycle.
            #4: 36"

            Sorry, 32" doesn't even make the top 4. Just my opinion, take it or leave it, I hope others chime in.

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            • #96
              Originally posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
              I'm just going to say it...I think your second unicycle should be a muni. I don't think 1.5 years of road riding is going to prepare you for muni. What will help is to start riding on uneven and resistant surfaces. I bought a "road" unicycle somewhat early-on, during the period when I was still fascinated my riding long distances. After spending time with the road unicycle, I found road riding to be a mixture of fear and boredom. I ended up converting my road unicycle to a 29" muni. Like you, Chief, I live next to awesome trails.

              IM(somewhat less than)HO, here's the correct order for your unicycles:

              #1: what you have
              #2: 27.5" muni
              #3: a nice trials/street unicycle.
              #4: 36"

              Sorry, 32" doesn't even make the top 4. Just my opinion, take it or leave it, I hope others chime in.
              Well that is certainly good food for thought. I can always ride a muni on the bike path until I get time to check out trails... I shall ponder the wisdom...

              Chief

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              • #97
                Originally posted by BHChieftain View Post
                I live near the Santa Cruz mountains in California and we have awesome trails around here in the redwood forests, so I will try muni then.
                There are a lot of unicyclists around the Santa Cruz area, though I don't know if there are any beginner-type get-togethers. A weekly event is Rob's Ride. If you haven't heard of that, you can search it here and on Google in general. But that's a long ride with a bunch of climbing; you're not ready for that yet.

                32" is fine for road, though if you really want to ride Road, and you're tall, just go straight to the 36". Lots more choices of frames, tires, etc. Or if you can afford the spendy Schlumpf, you can get a more versatile 29" with one of those, but again, that's more advanced riding.

                Your 24" is great for learning, and general riding around. A Trials uni is great for learning any skills on, though you can learn all of the basics on your 24". Trials unis are great for being indestructible, which is important if you are interested in doing Trials. And of course a Muni is the best machine for riding your area trails. Many can be ridden on a 32" or 36", like Rob's Ride, which is about 40% dirt, but the "fun" trails are much more fun on a wheel that can ride over the rougher stuff.
                John Foss
                www.unicycling.com

                "Who is going to argue with a mom who can ride a unicycle?" -- Forums member "HiMo"

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                • #98
                  Most of my riding is on shared paths (allowed to cycle or walk/run) and footpaths (AKA sidewalks). Many are old with cracked and displaced concrete slabs, driveways at odd slopes.

                  There are many overhanging trees, sticks and dropped fruit or nuts that are like ball bearings. Sometimes I have to ride on the grass plus up and down the kerb ramps. I also ride on the quiet roads, some with terrible surfaces.

                  This isn't as difficult as muni but much more interesting and a lot safer than just riding on the road. It builds up a good mix of skills for both road and off road.
                  Triton 36" + 29" | KH 29" | KH 26" | KH 27.5" Muni | Nimbus eSport Race 24" | Torker LX 24" | Qu-Ax Luxus 20" | Qu-Ax Profi 20" | KH / Impact 19" hybrid

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                  • #99
                    My additional 2 cents for the Muni discussion

                    Once more coming back to "I'm not doing this to commute or save time, more for fun and exercise."
                    A 27.5Ē Muni is a nice size for casual on and off-road riding and as your skills progress you can take it onto more challenging trails.
                    On-road you can easily ride up to 20 miles on a 27.5.

                    Yes, a dedicated road machine will be faster and consume less energy. But the objective is exercise 

                    Note Iím not saying you should go Mountian Unicycing, Iím proposing to get a Muni.
                    This will allow you to ride wherever you like without worrying the unicycle will be the limiting factor.

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                    • I agree, you don't have to "do" muni to own a muni.

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                      • I can see the pro's of going the 27.5 route... even if I don't plan to hit the mountains for awhile. I also like the idea of wide tire selection.

                        So, if I plan to do *more* bikepath/road than offroad with a 27.5, would the Oracle's 42mm wide rim/Kenda Havock 2" tire or the KH 55mm wide rim/Duo Crux 3.25" tire be a better choice for my riding scenario?

                        Chief

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                        • Hit 500' today! What really helped was adding air to my Nimbus 24" road tire. What got me thinking about that was that I finally made it to the end of my block, and turned left...

                          That new street has a very subtle downhill grade (just a tiny bit)-- but it was so much easier for me to relax in the seat when I pedaled. My tire pressure was at 40psi (I had it low to help with the mounts), and I think I was needing to pedal pretty hard on level ground and that was making it hard for me to settle in the seat.

                          Anyway, I set at at 55psi (kenda tire says 45-65psi range) and it was a LOT easier to settle in.

                          Static free mounts are coming along too-- I'm hitting it more than half the time, and the times I am not is generally because I'm not happy with my leading foot placement. Maybe 1 out of 10 I don't get enough pressure on the seat and the wheel rolls back.

                          I think making it all the way to the end of the block (about 1000') is in sight...

                          Chief

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                          • Originally posted by BHChieftain View Post
                            Hit 500' today! What really helped was adding air to my Nimbus 24" road tire. What got me thinking about that was that I finally made it to the end of my block, and turned left...

                            That new street has a very subtle downhill grade (just a tiny bit)-- but it was so much easier for me to relax in the seat when I pedaled. My tire pressure was at 40psi (I had it low to help with the mounts), and I think I was needing to pedal pretty hard on level ground and that was making it hard for me to settle in the seat.

                            Anyway, I set at at 55psi (kenda tire says 45-65psi range) and it was a LOT easier to settle in.

                            Static free mounts are coming along too-- I'm hitting it more than half the time, and the times I am not is generally because I'm not happy with my leading foot placement. Maybe 1 out of 10 I don't get enough pressure on the seat and the wheel rolls back.

                            I think making it all the way to the end of the block (about 1000') is in sight...

                            Chief
                            On my 36" Nightrider tire I run it right at the max pressure of 65psi on the road. It rolls easier and is less sensitive to road camber slope to the left or right. On gravel surfaces I'll drop the pressure down some.

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                            • Back to the which uni next-- how does the KH's 27.5 Duro Crux 3.25 tire feel on pavement? For the next 1.5yrs I'll be primary on smooth bike paths.

                              Chief

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                              • Originally posted by BHChieftain View Post
                                Back to the which uni next-- how does the KH's 27.5 Duro Crux 3.25 tire feel on pavement? For the next 1.5yrs I'll be primary on smooth bike paths.

                                Chief
                                Slightly off-topic, but I just went on UDC. The KH 27.5" is $950. The Oracle 27.5" (out of stock) is $685. I don't know if KH is worth the extra expense.

                                A 3.25" wide tire seems like overkill on mostly paved paths. You can always pump it up. The contact patch will shrink, then, and it will behave more like a road tire. At lower pressure, maybe not so fun on paved surfaces. If you were building a unicycle from parts, I'd say no, it's the wrong tire for your wishes, but you can make the stock tire work.

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