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New Beginner Uni - DRS 20 inch Solo Expert

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  • #16
    I'd say it's more like walking.
    You don't think of what you're doing just where you are going.

    I learned on grass and dirt because that's all there is here without driving to town.
    But when I did ride in town my skill level jumped up one whole notch.

    Once you have the basics as second nature, I think it would be pretty hard to lose.

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    • #17
      Well keep doing what's working for you, funnily enough the only times I've only ever injured myself are on grass. Always my right knee gets scuffed and it's pretty rare as most UPD's you land on your feet. But I've had a few on grass where I've tripped and scrapped my knee.

      as Canoeheadted has said once it becomes second nature you don't think about it you just do it. I started riding on grass when pavement became easy for me and I wanted to challenge myself. After a while it really amazes you what you can ride one wheel across, you start looking at areas and thinking can I ride across that?

      The one terrain that has me beat is sand though, I just can't make any progress on that. As soon as my wheel hits it, I come straight off. If it ever snowed here I'd give that a shot too.
      DRS 5'20" Giraffe || Nimbus II 24" || Nimbus Muni 29" || Kris Holm 36" Road

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      • #18
        Originally posted by wobblysteve View Post
        Does riding a Uni ever become second nature like riding a bike?
        How much attention does it take once you can ride?
        As a beginner, I could not ride and talk at the same time. So much of my attentions, my concentration, was taken up with trying to ride. I had to dismount before I could say anything more than a few grunts and groans. Within a couple years I could have a conversation while riding, and now I can look at people while talking to them...while riding.

        I think our goal is to pay attention while riding. And to challenge ourselves. When we practice hard stuff, the outcome is that easier stuff becomes easier and takes less attention.

        Thanks for sharing your progress with us, wobblysteve. Keep practicing!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Unigan View Post
          (...) If it ever snowed here I'd give that a shot too.
          A few days ago we had our first snow of the year. Not much - a couple of inches - and it didn't hold long.
          But it was my first time riding in the snow and a lot of fun.
          It also made it very clear that there's no such thing as a straight line. Not when I'm doing the riding.

          Sorry for the derailing bout. Carry on.

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          • #20
            My practicing continues - about an hour each day or until I become sore/tired/frustrated.
            Most of my practice has been on grass. There is a nice smooth, hard section of turf right next to a post which I can prop myself against and push off from. My best effort was about 8 pedals before I fell off. I try to look up and keep my arms moving for stability, which seems to help.
            Originally posted by Unigan View Post
            Well keep doing what's working for you.
            Hey Unigan, I have practiced a couple of times now on a tennis court. I have aquired my sons old skateboarding helmet, which makes me feel a little bit safer on the hard surfaces.The pedaling is a lot easier than on grass and I can feel the 'balance point', if that makes sense. I was concerned that I would bugger up my seat from the repeated drops onto concrete so I gaffer taped a couple of layers of cardboard around the front of my seat. This seems to be working for me now.

            Originally posted by Garp View Post
            A few days ago we had our first snow of the year. Not much - a couple of inches - and it didn't hold long.
            But it was my first time riding in the snow and a lot of fun.
            It also made it very clear that there's no such thing as a straight line. Not when I'm doing the riding.

            Sorry for the derailing bout. Carry on.
            Hey Garp, I have only ever seen snow twice in my whole life... in summer here it can reach 40-45 degrees celsius, which I think is over 100 degrees fahrenheit.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
              As a beginner, I could not ride and talk at the same time. So much of my attentions, my concentration, was taken up with trying to ride.
              I can completely relate to this elpuebloUNIdo... I realised that I was holding my breath when I was starting off... I have stopped doing this haha

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              • #22
                Originally posted by wobblysteve View Post
                I was holding my breath when I was starting off
                I remember this from starting out
                So focused (cramped?) on trying to ride that you forget absolutely everything else.
                You get tired VERY fast when not breathing!

                I made a conscious effort to remind myself: "keep breathing"
                Lateron in the learning process I had to do the same for: "keep weight on the seat"

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by wobblysteve View Post
                  I realised that I was holding my breath when I was starting off... I have stopped doing this haha
                  I did this to at first.

                  Another aspect of breathing to be aware of. In many physical activities we often get into a breathing rhythm such as our steps when running.

                  Avoid this on a unicycle particularly on hill climbing because you will get less air as you slow down.
                  Triton 36" + 29" | KH 29" | KH 26" | KH 27.5" Muni | Nimbus eSport Race 24" | Torker LX 24" | Qu-Ax Luxus 20" | Qu-Ax Profi 20" | KH / Impact 19" hybrid

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by wobblysteve View Post

                    Hey Unigan, I have practiced a couple of times now on a tennis court. I have aquired my sons old skateboarding helmet, which makes me feel a little bit safer on the hard surfaces.The pedaling is a lot easier than on grass and I can feel the 'balance point', if that makes sense. I was concerned that I would bugger up my seat from the repeated drops onto concrete so I gaffer taped a couple of layers of cardboard around the front of my seat. This seems to be working for me now.
                    Glad it's working out for you and I wouldn't worry about damaging the seat, most unicycles are pretty robust and I've dropped all of mine onto concrete more times then I can count even at speed. The worst that happens is the bumpers on the seat get a lot of scuffs and it looks a little unseemly. UPD's are a fact of life on a unicycle especially when you're learning and I still have the odd one here and there even after riding for months.

                    If you UPD don't try to catch the uni just worry about yourself land on your feet and let the uni fall as far away from you as possible.
                    DRS 5'20" Giraffe || Nimbus II 24" || Nimbus Muni 29" || Kris Holm 36" Road

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Unigan View Post
                      Glad it's working out for you and I wouldn't worry about damaging the seat, most unicycles are pretty robust and I've dropped all of mine onto concrete more times then I can count even at speed. The worst that happens is the bumpers on the seat get a lot of scuffs and it looks a little unseemly. UPD's are a fact of life on a unicycle especially when you're learning and I still have the odd one here and there even after riding for months.

                      If you UPD don't try to catch the uni just worry about yourself land on your feet and let the uni fall as far away from you as possible.
                      UPD = unplanned dismount right? That sounds so much better than falling off. I need to adjust my terminology Unigan haha

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by wobblysteve View Post
                        Hey Garp, I have only ever seen snow twice in my whole life... in summer here it can reach 40-45 degrees celsius, which I think is over 100 degrees fahrenheit.
                        Oh that is a shame. Snow is fun, and with unicycling it adds a very interesting challenges, particularly as different types of snow (variations in cold, wetness, depth, icey or powdery…) massively change the way you ride. You can master it one day and find it tremendously difficult the next. This is a good thing as it forces you outside of your comfort zone, which is how we all learn.
                        Last edited by ruari; 2019-11-26, 11:20 AM.

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