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Any advise for first mountain uni?

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  • elpuebloUNIdo
    replied
    Originally posted by Vogelfrei80 View Post
    I think the same. In these days I find the bravery to try stairs: 20% went ok on a 5 steps stair; 0% of success on a 10 steps stair... however I did try, which is a great success!
    Practicing stairs is also going to help your still stands, which is going to help your mountain unicycling on steep ascents when you slow down to a standstill.

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  • Vogelfrei80
    replied
    Originally posted by tholub View Post
    What a beautiful place! Too bad the trail wound up being too hard for you, but as long as you keep pushing yourself you'll make progress quickly.
    I think the same. In these days I find the bravery to try stairs: 20% went ok on a 5 steps stair; 0% of success on a 10 steps stair... however I did try, which is a great success!

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  • tholub
    replied
    What a beautiful place! Too bad the trail wound up being too hard for you, but as long as you keep pushing yourself you'll make progress quickly.

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  • Vogelfrei80
    replied
    Those were old good shoes... the soles became hard and lost all elasticity during 10 years of stop. First steps on the rocks made the hard sole disconnect from the rest of the shoe

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  • johnfoss
    replied
    What an adventure! Yes, I guess it helps to know a trail beforehand, so you don't bring the uni where you'll have to just carry it.

    Wow, the exploded shoes! I gather those were not made for hiking. Or being outdoors...

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  • Vogelfrei80
    replied
    The

    The part I ride was easy with almost flat land to freemount.

    The saddle was lower than normal.

    The uni "decided" to roll over a lot of possibile small rocky stops as I keep slowly standing on pedals and go on pushing whatever could happen.

    Today I ride successfully for my fist time the steep downroad to my garage. I thought what I did during the mountain experience and everything went ok

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  • Dingfelder
    replied
    Wow that looks like a brutal ride! Congratulations on getting through it with your family none the worse for wear!

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  • Vogelfrei80
    replied
    - Adveturer
    - Cunning
    - Looking at the trail form the beginning... "Look those rocks are small... you can ride!"
    - The "Easy part"
    - My family cursing my unicycle
    - the exploded shoes
    Attached Files

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  • Vogelfrei80
    replied
    It was too difficult

    I'm back home and alive!

    Due to a misjudgement the trail was completely impossible for my skill level. Only rocks about 10 to 40 cm diametres, steep descents difficult also by walking.. Probably a 4.8" tire could ride 40% of the descent... maybe a top rider could ride about 60% time.

    However I was completely scared. About the end of the trail it became feasible, but I chickend out squeezing the brake that could't stop me (I'm learning freewheel and I didn't remember that I can brake with my legs too!).
    I did a lot of tries just to freemount... When I finally decided to release the brake and use only legs to freemount... everything goes well and I manage about 200 metres ride (with the steepest descent I've ever done).

    The party:
    - The Adventurer: Me, 38 y.o., wearing a dragon scale plate armour and a 29 KH
    - The Witch: my 37 y.o. wife wearing the youngest child wrapped to her body and casting curses on me and our idea of walking down the rocky trail (we should had chosen the normal walking path, but it wasn't my fault: she decided our fate "sensing" the way)
    - The Cunning: our 6 y.o. son
    - The Imperturbable: our 8 m.o. son wrapped to his mother

    Casualties:
    Witch's shoes. They exploded due to the easyness of the rocky trail

    Scared to death:
    Parents: The Cunning performed shouting a new move: the famous Death's rolling! While his parents where staring to him due to his shouting of scare he perfomed a front flip rolling on his back on a big rock. I throw my uni, fly to him crying that if he'll live after that fall I'll help him die. No injuries at all, only a big fright.

    Treasures:
    Happyness for being alive at the end of the trail.
    Happyness for my wife's feet which weren't hurting or bleeding too much
    Happyness for my wife having not killed the Imperturbale not falling frontward on him
    Happyness for me riding about 3% of the descent

    Now I'm going to sleep. I cannot read the forum tillnow, but found a lot of truth in you all!
    Thank you!
    Tomorrow photos
    Last edited by Vogelfrei80; 2018-08-09, 11:30 PM.

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  • Dingfelder
    replied
    Yup, I read it as you said it, within that context.

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  • pierrox
    replied
    I would add: lower your seat. If you're mostly ride on flat with the occasional bumps or gravel, it'll probably be way too high for downhill. Last year I muni'ed in the Swiss Alps with my 24". Started by lowering the seat by 2cm, but quickly I realized I needed to be almost 10cm lower than normal! Take an allen wrench with you so you can adjust on the spot - in my case, I had to do it several times as there were long stretches of flat track between steep descents.
    And use your brake, your legs will thank you at the end of the day!

    Leave a comment:


  • Mikefule
    replied
    Originally posted by OneTrackMind View Post
    A horse has its own sense of self preservation. A unicycle simply obeys the Law of Gravitation and has no issue at all with rolling right off a cliff.
    That is why what I wrote was <<For very short steep descents with a safe run off area, it is sometimes safer to let the uni have its head, rather than nursing your way down.>>

    Imagine a 45 degree down slope for a couple of metres, with a flattish,smoothis area below it. Depending on the exact steepness and height, and your ability, it is sometimes better to let the uni go down at its natural speed, with the rider doing little more than steering. The alternative is to try to keep it under perfect control with each pedal stroke, losing it and finding yourself being projected like a stone from a trebuchet.

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  • OneTrackMind
    replied
    Originally posted by Dingfelder View Post
    Interesting ... reminds me of what I was told when riding horses on narrow precarious trails up and down steep hills ... something like, if you try to control the horse too much, you might get hurt. Just trust the horse and don't interfere with it. The horse knows what it's doing and doesn't want to get hurt either.

    Certainly seems to work for a lot of sports -- go with the flow, don't fight it.
    A horse has its own sense of self preservation. A unicycle simply obeys the Law of Gravitation and has no issue at all with rolling right off a cliff.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dingfelder
    replied
    Originally posted by Mikefule View Post
    For very short steep descents with a safe run off area, it is sometimes safer to let the uni have its head, rather than nursing your way down.
    Interesting ... reminds me of what I was told when riding horses on narrow precarious trails up and down steep hills ... something like, if you try to control the horse too much, you might get hurt. Just trust the horse and don't interfere with it. The horse knows what it's doing and doesn't want to get hurt either.

    Certainly seems to work for a lot of sports -- go with the flow, don't fight it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mikefule
    replied
    Keep to a reasonably cautious speed downhill so you have plenty in reserve.

    When you hit a short patch of rough or uneven terrain, ride at it confidently treating it as a single obstacle rather than a series of small obstacles.

    For very short steep descents with a safe run off area, it is sometimes safer to let the uni have its head, rather than nursing your way down.

    Take plenty of water, plenty of emergency calories, spare tube and/or puncture repair kit, basic tools.

    Take breaks.

    Enjoy. There will always be another day. If you try too much, push yourself too hard, and wear yourself out physically and mentally, you will be demoralised.

    Leave a comment:

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