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Any tips on starting with a ultimate wheel?

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  • #31
    Is it possible to adjust the position of the feet on the pedals?

    Right now the riding distance is mainly limited by how quick my feet slip off the pedals. The rim hits in the ankle from time to time, causing little slippage, and finally I have to jump off. So I'd be interested to know how to adjust feets on the pedals without getting off... Can not imagine the technique right now.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by haqreu View Post
      Is it possible to adjust the position of the feet on the pedals?

      Right now the riding distance is mainly limited by how quick my feet slip off the pedals. The rim hits in the ankle from time to time, causing little slippage, and finally I have to jump off. So I'd be interested to know how to adjust feets on the pedals without getting off... Can not imagine the technique right now.
      Get pedals with pins?

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      • #33
        I have major marks on my calfs and shins due to unicycle pinned pedals. I guess that pinned pedals are not any good for contraptions where your only support are the pedals...
        I keep pinned pedals on my muny, however after few months and lots of spilled blood I have removed it from my 20" street. Doing 360 spins with pinned pedals is definitely not a good idea.
        Last edited by haqreu; 2018-10-14, 07:48 PM.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by haqreu View Post
          I have major marks on my calfs and shins due to unicycle pinned pedals. I guess that pinned pedals are not any good for contraptions where your only support are the pedals...
          I keep pinned pedals on my muny, however after few months and lots of spilled blood I have removed it from my 20" street. Doing 360 spins with pinned pedals is definitely not a good idea.
          I don't do any fancy tricks and love the pins on my unicycles, also with hopping I prefer to have pins and shoes with flat soles. For UW I think pins are only good for people who can easily ride a few 100 metres already.

          It is nice to see that flat pedals are stock pedals, so I won't have pedal bite when I start learning. As I get better, I might get pinned pedals myself.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by haqreu View Post
            I have major marks on my calfs and shins due to unicycle pinned pedals. I guess that pinned pedals are not any good for contraptions where your only support are the pedals...
            Yup, those scars look like lifers. Seems an injury/problem largely unaddressed,
            Nimbus Oracle 24" muni, Nimbus II 20" Independence, Gotway MSuper V3 EUC, ebay EUC trainer

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Dingfelder View Post
              Yup, those scars look like lifers. Seems an injury/problem largely unaddressed,
              Once you reach a certain level of confidence, you will find that when you use pinned pedals you will fall off less often, and ride better.

              If you subscribe to the "wheels are round so they can roll" school of unicycling, you will seldom if ever hurt yourself with pinned pedals.

              If you subscribe to the "tyres are rubber so they bounce" school of unicycling, you may need lower leg protection, which is readily available.
              My first novel, Bridge of Otherwhere, Michael Wilkinson, on Kindle. A tale of subtle magic, mystery, friendship and love. Tinyurl.com/Bridge-of-Otherwhere For US$ page: TinyURL.com/OtherwhereBridge

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              • #37
                Even without jumping, pinned pedals do stick to the shoes (as intended). To get a foot off a pedal you need to lift it vertically. Sudden sideways falls can be tricky to land on the feet.

                With little experience I have I certainly would not recommend pinned pedals on a ultimate wheel. Riding a regular unicycle is another story: slippery wet plastic is not a near match to good pinned pedals.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Mikefule View Post
                  If you subscribe to the "wheels are round so they can roll" school of unicycling, you will seldom if ever hurt yourself with pinned pedals.
                  I've been riding seven years, and yesterday morning I missed a completely routine mount. Pinned pedal, meet shin!

                  I recommend subscribing to the "you bought those shinguards so you could wear them" school of unicycling.
                  Attached Files

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by haqreu View Post
                    ...I'd be interested to know how to adjust feets on the pedals without getting off... Can not imagine the technique right now.
                    To (mis-)quote Han Solo: "I can Imagine it quite a bit."
                    As the pedals come level, this is your opportunity to lighten your pressure on the pedals (slight jump) and reposition your feet. Not for the faint of heart, and probably to be saved until you are a much more comfortable UW-er.
                    Originally posted by haqreu View Post
                    I have major marks on my calfs and shins due to unicycle pinned pedals.
                    Yes, pins can get you. Stick to plastic pedals, which can still get you, but I think this is much less of an issue on an UW, where the wheel generally stops as you dismount. You can also try for grippier shoes; both halves of that pedal contact equation can be adjusted.
                    Last edited by johnfoss; 2018-10-16, 03:54 AM.
                    John Foss
                    www.unicycling.com

                    "Who is going to argue with a mom who can ride a unicycle?" -- Forums member "HiMo"

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by MrImpossible View Post
                      I've been riding seven years, and yesterday morning I missed a completely routine mount. Pinned pedal, meet shin!

                      I recommend subscribing to the "you bought those shinguards so you could wear them" school of unicycling.
                      Nasty!

                      I've been riding 30 odd years but only "seriously" for the last 20, and all my unis have pinned pedals. I have only injured myself with them once (7 stitches in my calf) when I got tangled in a UPD on a short steep descent. I've never injured my shins with a pinned pedal.
                      My first novel, Bridge of Otherwhere, Michael Wilkinson, on Kindle. A tale of subtle magic, mystery, friendship and love. Tinyurl.com/Bridge-of-Otherwhere For US$ page: TinyURL.com/OtherwhereBridge

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Mikefule View Post
                        all my unis have pinned pedals
                        I experimented, for several months, with really aggressive pinned pedals on my muni. Then I went back to the Nimbus pinned pedals, and even then, I slightly rounded the edge of each pin. I can understand how riders in wet conditions and those making serious drops...would like the aggressive pins, but for my dry conditions and slightly-less-than-macho riding style, they were overkill.

                        A while back, the pedals on my 20" wore down, and the plastic pins pretty much disappeared. I was then able to learn, for lack of a better term, positive traction control with my feet on the pedals. If I had kept using pinned pedals, I don't think I would have learned that technique. I like to slide my foot position toward the toe when doing harder stuff. It would be a lot more difficult if the pins were too aggressive.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
                          It would be a lot more difficult if the pins were too aggressive.
                          But doesn;t only depend on the pins if you have traction. having shoes with profile and pins is overkill. I prefer to have very flat shoes. Having flat plastic pedals and shoes with deep profile has no effect of course. In any case with flat soles, I can still shift my feet easily on my uni or get off in case of a UPD. Why is it only October. My b-day is in the second half of november. Before I was married, I could buy whatever I like whenever I like. Now that is all over I want my UW

                          By the way is it better to focus on freemounting a UW ride away instead of learning to ride along a wall or is that unrealistic.
                          Last edited by Setonix; 2018-10-16, 06:26 PM.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Setonix View Post
                            By the way is it better to focus on freemounting a UW ride away instead of learning to ride along a wall or is that unrealistic.
                            My opinion, short version: you do not need to learn freemounting the UW, neither ride along a wall.

                            Extended: riding a wall would possibly help from falling sideways on a normal uni, but believe me, the wall won't stop you from dismounting when learning UW. Personally I have found a lamppost, and I mount holding on the lamppost, pedals vertical, dominant foot down. Then, (while still holding to the post) turn the pedals 45, let the lamppost go, fall, rinse, repeat. If you know how to ride normal uni, sideways falling is not a problem. The problem is the weight repartition between pedals, and the wall wont help here.

                            Learning how to freemount if you can not ride the wheel is exhausting and pointless. If you can do at least 10 revolutions starting from a lamppost, you already know how to freemount.

                            In a case, it took me 3 to 4 hours "saddle" time to learn riding 10 full revolutions repeatedly.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by haqreu View Post
                              My opinion, short version: you do not need to learn freemounting the UW, neither ride along a wall.

                              Extended: riding a wall would possibly help from falling sideways on a normal uni, but believe me, the wall won't stop you from dismounting when learning UW. Personally I have found a lamppost, and I mount holding on the lamppost, pedals vertical, dominant foot down. Then, (while still holding to the post) turn the pedals 45, let the lamppost go, fall, rinse, repeat. If you know how to ride normal uni, sideways falling is not a problem. The problem is the weight repartition between pedals, and the wall wont help here.

                              Learning how to freemount if you can not ride the wheel is exhausting and pointless. If you can do at least 10 revolutions starting from a lamppost, you already know how to freemount.

                              In a case, it took me 3 to 4 hours "saddle" time to learn riding 10 full revolutions repeatedly.
                              Freemounting a UW is surprisingly easy if you hold the top of the wheel as you do it. Takes only a few tries to learn. Extends your cruising range.
                              Last edited by Mikefule; 2018-10-16, 09:56 PM.
                              My first novel, Bridge of Otherwhere, Michael Wilkinson, on Kindle. A tale of subtle magic, mystery, friendship and love. Tinyurl.com/Bridge-of-Otherwhere For US$ page: TinyURL.com/OtherwhereBridge

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                              • #45
                                Over the past week, I've progressed hugely in terms of what I can do, and I've also come across pedal slipping on my stock wimpy pedals. Generally speaking, this hasn't been much of a problem as long as my heel doesn't get in the bars of the UW, which has lead to my ugliest UPD's and my only actual injury, a pathetically unimpressive scab on my elbow.

                                That being said, the best solution to foot-slippage is to just slip your foot back into place. In order to do this, you need to be able to pause while riding, grip the wheel with your hand, and move the offending foot into a better position. Honestly, being able to stop and grip the wheel is the most critical skill I've learned aside from simply riding forward. It's the natural follow up to free-mounting, which is why I would encourage learning that as well. Stopping and gripping is good for fixing foot position, hopping down drops and up stairs, and turning on a dime if you aren't comfortable swinging your hips to do that. It's really worth your time.

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