Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

29" trainer

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 29" trainer

    I have been considering getting a larger wheel uni than my 24
    I really like my Torker LX 24" but it's tough to keep up with my wife when we ride around the neighborhood. I'm still in the learning stages but am improving every time I ride. My question really is about the Trainer 29" at unicycle .com
    would this be a decent uni to buy for just riding around on the streets
    I have been doing a little off road on the 24 but don't really see myself getting heavy into muni riding as I have a mountain bike for that. Well and I don't heal as fast as I used to

    any way what says you guys
    24" Torker LX
    29" UDC Trainer
    32" UDC trainer

  • #2
    This question has been discussed here before, even quite recently, so if you search you will find many threads to answer it. Most of the threads you find will probably resemble this one.

    A stronger unicycle is generally worth the extra money, but that depends a bit, not only on what sort of riding you want to do, but also on how much you weigh. Another option is to wait until something good shows up on Craigslist, Ebay or here. Oh well, good luck!

    Comment


    • #3
      YEP, just being lazy and didn't search. Thanks for the link to the thread
      I think I may just keep looking, still not sure if I want to go with 27" or 29" anyway
      my thoughts for it are for mostly just paved type roads and paths
      I am around 5'7" and under 170 lbs
      Last edited by aj1500; 2018-05-15, 06:41 PM.
      24" Torker LX
      29" UDC Trainer
      32" UDC trainer

      Comment


      • #4
        For paved roads and paths, and especially if you are trying to keep up with someone on a bike, a 29 (or larger) is better than a 27.

        Comment


        • #5
          My 29"/700c unicycle was built up from parts I found online but ended up very close in spec to UDC's 29" Trainer, and that's the one I've wound up riding the most. So yeah, I think you could have a lot of fun on it. It's a great size for casual neighborhood rides and sidewalk cruising, especially with pedestrians to avoid or on routes that call for frequent dismounts and remounts. It's my lowest-effort option for relaxed road riding, and I enjoy riding it off-pavement on jogging paths and well groomed trails too.

          With a pretty narrow rim you can usually find a variety of closeout tires (touring/townie/comfort bike/tandem sized) that will fit for really cheap, and it's been fun trying out different tires on it. Local bike shops even have a box of super discounted "mounted once" tires sometimes, and it doesn't matter to us if they don't have a matching pair!

          I put 137 mm cranks on mine initially then switched down to 125s when I my confidence grew. I'm too lazy to go check but IIRC the Trainer comes standard with 150s, which would be waaaaaay too long for the type of riding that suits it.

          Good luck with whatever you decide to go with.

          Comment


          • #6
            I own or have owned all the common sizes. i'm also 55 and roughly the same height and weight as the OP. However, i do have 30 years of riding under my belt so it's not a perfect match.

            I mainly use the 36 for roads and easy trails. I can average 11 mph for extended periods (e.g. over a 20 mile ride) which is still slower than a bike unless the bicyclist is dawdling. The disadvantages of the 36 are size and weight (storage and transport) and it can be hard work to remount when you're really tired and/or on rough ground.

            My wife and I have occasionally done short rides (10 - 20 miles) with her on bicycle and me on the 36. I was riding flat out and she was taking it steady.

            The 29 is a good all round size. With dual hole cranks, I can do moderate muni on the long holes (150-ish) and road and trails on the shorter (125-ish). I did a lot of experimenting a year or so back and found the 29 on shortish cranks the best all round option for a short commute. It is easier to store and transport, and safer when mixing with pedestrians on a crowded path. However, it's good for less than 10 mph for extended periods.

            I used to know a guy who could ride his 29 faster than I could ride my 36, but he was younger and fitter than I was at the time and he probably still is. Definitely still younger!

            I have a 28. That's a 700c with a 32 mm section general purpose road tyre. It has square tapers and I have a big box of various cranks. I generally ride it on 114mm cranks and it is fast on road and easy trails. However, it is soon stopped by mud or by rough terrain.

            Long way round saying 29 is the best all round size, but will not keep up with a well ridden bicycle. Far better to teach the missus to ride a unicycle!
            My first novel, Bridge of Otherwhere, Michael Wilkinson, on Kindle. A tale of subtle magic, mystery, friendship and love. Tinyurl.com/Bridge-of-Otherwhere For US$ page: TinyURL.com/OtherwhereBridge

            Comment


            • #7
              I've been unicycling for 9 months now. I've had a 24", 26", 29" and 36" (Mike's old Nimbus).

              I find myself using the 29" most of the time. It's easy to mount, stash in the car and can travel at a reasonable speed etc. My partner is a runner, and I use it to accompany her, as we are reasonably well matched speed wise. The 36er is great for faster longer rides.

              I think that the 29" uni is about the most versatile in my experience so far.

              Go for it.

              Comment


              • #8
                thanks for all the great replies

                so at least that helped me make up my mind as to the size I want
                I'll keep my eye out for a good used one, as for finding one on craigslist
                I feel like I'm the only person in south Ga that rides a uni
                only thing I have ever seen around here are 20" from time to time

                again thanks for all the responses
                24" Torker LX
                29" UDC Trainer
                32" UDC trainer

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Fat D View Post
                  The 36er is great for faster longer rides.

                  I think that the 29" uni is about the most versatile in my experience so far.
                  Glad you're enjoying the 36. I did 15 miles on my KH36 this evening, averaging just under 11 mph despite a section of unmade/ballasted track and a ferocious headwind for part of the ride.

                  Another advantage of the 29: riding at night, a decent USB rechargeable light mounted directly to the fork crown is near enough to the road to be good enough at the speed you'll be doing. My 29 is my weapon of choice for nighttime rides along country lanes.
                  My first novel, Bridge of Otherwhere, Michael Wilkinson, on Kindle. A tale of subtle magic, mystery, friendship and love. Tinyurl.com/Bridge-of-Otherwhere For US$ page: TinyURL.com/OtherwhereBridge

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    On thing with the 29" that may be an advantage to some is that you are noticed less. You are only a little bit taller than on a bike and many bystanders can just glance past you and not really take in that you are on a unicycle.

                    A 36" by comparison really stands out as you are much higher up and the wheel is so much bigger.

                    I realise that most here (myself included) don't care if they get looked at or might actively enjoy it but for someone who is a little more shy, this is another consideration at least.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ruari View Post
                      On thing with the 29" that may be an advantage to some is that you are noticed less. You are only a little bit taller than on a bike and many bystanders can just glance past you and not really take in that you are on a unicycle.
                      This is actually a very interesting point, and now that you mention it, I think some people have definitely not noticed that I was on a unicycle when I was on my 29. If you are on a 36 or a 20, it really is much harder for them not to notice. Oh well, something to keep in mind for the days when i am not in the mood to have people screaming and pointing at me!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mikefule View Post
                        Glad you're enjoying the 36. I did 15 miles on my KH36 this evening, averaging just under 11 mph despite a section of unmade/ballasted track and a ferocious headwind for part of the ride.

                        Another advantage of the 29: riding at night, a decent USB rechargeable light mounted directly to the fork crown is near enough to the road to be good enough at the speed you'll be doing. My 29 is my weapon of choice for nighttime rides along country lanes.
                        Hi Mike,

                        I love the 36er. It ups the pace when the boss is running, as its that bit quicker than the 29er. She prefers that I ride the 29er when we were together.

                        I need to give the 36er a try on some gentle off road to see what it is like.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          if the consensus is the 29 is better with 125 cranks why does it come with 150
                          also as I'm still kind of in the beginner stages would it be better to start with the 150 and then move to the shorter cranks or just get the shorter from the start
                          24" Torker LX
                          29" UDC Trainer
                          32" UDC trainer

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by aj1500 View Post
                            if the consensus is the 29 is better with 125 cranks why does it come with 150
                            also as I'm still kind of in the beginner stages would it be better to start with the 150 and then move to the shorter cranks or just get the shorter from the start
                            I don't like 125mm at all. Now after 2.5 years of riding I found that 140mm is very fine for me, but for offroad, I still prefer my 150mm. I find 125mm way too short. Braking is harder, mounting is harder.

                            You should get some dual hole cranks to more easily experiment.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              There is no consensus across all unicyclists about crank length. There are opinions, specialised needs, and fashions.

                              I have ridden my 28 on cranks from 80mm up to 150, my 24 on cranks from 102 to 170. I ride my 29 mainly on 150s but at the moment I have my 36 on 125s.

                              150 mm on a 29 is a good all round size for control on and off road, easy mounting, idling,and reasonable speed. Shorter cranks will cruise faster, but with some losses in the other things on the list.

                              There is also a macho aspect to riding short cranks.

                              I look at it this way: you may need the long cranks on a steep hill, and you can always learn to spin faster on the flat. Racing cyclists in the Tour de France etc. spend tens of thousands on a bike and could have any cranks they wanted and I think they all have cranks somewhere around 165 - 175 mm.
                              My first novel, Bridge of Otherwhere, Michael Wilkinson, on Kindle. A tale of subtle magic, mystery, friendship and love. Tinyurl.com/Bridge-of-Otherwhere For US$ page: TinyURL.com/OtherwhereBridge

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X