Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

36er

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 36er

    I am interested in a 36er but without spending a ton of money. I would much prefer a uni that will last me a long time and would be robust. Would the Coker suit me well? If it wouldn't, do any of you have any recommendations on what I should get? You should know that I'm 14 and don't have an an income besides gifts and snow shoveling money. Also, are brakes and/or handlebars very important pieces to a 36er? Finally, The Coker only comes with 150mm cranks. Are those too big for a 36er if I want it for long distance riding? If it is, can I change the cranks on a Coker?
    "If it was easy it would be called Mountain Biking"
    -Kris Holm

  • #2
    Hi Adam,
    I highly recommend the udc Titan (starts at $450). I've had one for a couple years now and it's been great. When choosing a 36er I was trying to decide between a coker or the Titan and I chose the Titan because it is more upgradable (Coker have some parts that are only compatible with Coker) and when I was doing my research I found that the Coker had more cases of factory defects as well. Also the udc Titan used to be a nimbus Titan comes with what I believe is a better tire and I have had nothing but incredibly good luck with nimbus products they are really great stuff.

    As for the brake and handle bar I have both on mine. I would definitely recommend a brake. I run 100mm cranks (don't start with these on your 36er they are difficult to mount and control the wheel with.) Going down larger hills a brake is a necessaty with small cranks.

    The handlebar is nice but not a necessary. If you are tight on money I would recommend just getting used to the 36er first and purchasing one later if you still want to. It is basically just a good spot to put your hands and lets you get into a more bike like stance. An added benefit to getting a handle later is that as you learn to manage the big wheel you won't have to worry about dropping it onto the bars.

    The cranks length is based off of two things. 1.) the terrain you will be riding, 2.) skill level. If I'm not mistaken the Coker has only the choice of 150 and the Titan gives you the choice of ventures or steel cranks in a couple sizes (another benefit of the Titan, I recommend getting the ventures much lighter and stronger) 150mm cranks are going to give you more torque and control but you will have to move your legs farther per revolution which may result in less speed. If you are going to be riding a lot of hills or going off-road or need to weave around a lot of people with it I would go with 150s. If you are going to be doing Road riding for long distances the 125s would be a good starting point (what I chose). That being said as you develop as a rider your going to want to change parts and change things. I ride 100s which are usually for freestyle unis and yet with practice I can climb any hill I have come across with it.

    Hope this helps! And good luck!

    -Jack
    Last edited by UniJack; 2016-07-31, 01:10 PM.
    More ideas than talent

    Comment


    • #3
      I have Coker and its great. I don't think there is that much of a difference between the two unis. Both have square taper cranks, so the Coker can be upgraded as much as the Titan with cranks, brakes, and handlebars.

      I know Coker use to offer 125mm cranks.

      If your buying new I would buy the Titan just to support UDC. The Coker Tire Co. doesn't support unicycling like UDC.

      Comment


      • #4
        How many threads have you posted on the same subject?

        Seriously, you've gotten lots of good info in your other threads, piggy back on them from there rather than posting 10 new threads about the same thing.
        "I used to watch Highway Patrol whittlin' with my knife..." - NY

        Comment


        • #5
          Where in NJ do you live? Can you get into Manhattan for a club meeting? You'll usually be able to try different unicycles, esp if you contact the group ahead of time. http://www.newyorkunicycle.com/blog/

          Comment

          Working...
          X