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Newbie Learning to Ride Off Road

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  • elpuebloUNIdo
    replied
    Originally posted by Setonix View Post
    wheel walking is just for in the circus really, apart from the fact that they add on to your total balance feel of course.
    Wheel walking, for me, puts me back in touch with the sensations of being a beginner unicyclist. Some of the same issues apply: I burn out fairly quickly, I flail my arms like mad, steering is a challenge, I have to remind myself not to start too fast or accelerate past the point of no return, and I have to remember to breathe and relax. And it reminds me that I'm not a particularly fast learner.

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  • Setonix
    replied
    Originally posted by Matt B View Post
    Get good protection gear. When you feel safer (especially at an older age) your confidence to try new things goes up BIG time. Ran into a SOLID BIG tree going pretty fast. Hit my head (helmet) on it hard. My Muni buddy stops "man, you OK!!" I look up from the ground "yeah, fine". His response, "isn't cool how you can run into things and not get hurt".
    Find someone to ride with, if possible. I ran into another Muni guy on the trails one day. He is younger and a step better, so we ride 1-2 times a week together Just riding behind him, talking about how to do stuff, etc made a difference. Plus "if he can do it, so can I" goes a long way!!!
    Even with good gear, Im still too careful and lack confidence. I can hop and when I do I hop higher than a kerb, yet hopping on to a kerb I don't dare because I think I will trip.
    As for having other unicyclist living close by, you have to be lucky. Not everybody has that commodity. I ride alone 99% of the time. Even though I don't do any tricks, I just use the uni for exploring and riding 10-20km cross country. Just love the feeling. There where I ride I don't need to hop or idle and wheel walking is just for in the circus really, apart from the fact that they add on to your total balance feel of course.

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  • Matt B
    replied
    Muni freemount

    I been riding about 4 months, at age 60. I ride my 29" Muni mostly, but also have a 24" Muni for learning and being more controllable for new things.
    It helped learning to do a walking mount also, especially if over a 26" wheel and needing to mount going up a grade. That little bit of forward momentum walking helps on the uphill mounts. Downhill mounts, do not over jump when mounting.
    I also try new stuff (ie steep descents, log obstacles, small jumps, etc) with my 24" as I have more confidence on it. It then translates to the 29" pretty easy.
    Get good protection gear. When you feel safer (especially at an older age) your confidence to try new things goes up BIG time. Ran into a SOLID BIG tree going pretty fast. Hit my head (helmet) on it hard. My Muni buddy stops "man, you OK!!" I look up from the ground "yeah, fine". His response, "isn't cool how you can run into things and not get hurt".
    Find someone to ride with, if possible. I ran into another Muni guy on the trails one day. He is younger and a step better, so we ride 1-2 times a week together Just riding behind him, talking about how to do stuff, etc made a difference. Plus "if he can do it, so can I" goes a long way!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Spinningwoman
    replied
    Originally posted by pierrox View Post
    Or are you a 'bot?
    That's what I thought.

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  • pierrox
    replied
    Originally posted by Spinningwoman View Post
    Are you a unicyclist?
    Or are you a 'bot?

    Leave a comment:


  • Spinningwoman
    replied
    Originally posted by Brandon325 View Post
    I have had BPPV for nearly one year without relief. I had done the Epley Maneuver and many exercises but they only offered partial relief. So I am currently waiting to see the physical therapist who will be more likely to have experience treating such cases and get the BPPV physiotherapy treatment from a clinic nearby in Toronto. As far as I have experienced and researched about this physiotherapy is the best treatment for BPPV.
    Are you a unicyclist?

    Leave a comment:


  • Brandon325
    replied
    Originally posted by Spinningwoman View Post
    If it is actual BPPV, it is caused by some of the little balance crystals in the inner ear getting out of place. The most distinctive feature of BPPV compared to other vertigo is that it hits you lying down, especially when you turn over or turn your head to the side. (It hits you standing up as well but other vertigo types do that too, so the lying down is diagnostic). If it is BPPV there is a head manoever than can fix it by rolling the crystals back into position. Called something like the Eppley manoeuvre?? You have to find a trained practitioner or else use a device called the Dizzyfix that lets you do it at home. It sounds a little flakey and the Dizzyfix is laughable, but it is a genuine treatment and it worked for me first time. I have never had a recurrence. I'll look up the reference. It saved my driving licence and my job when I got BPPV after a long overnight train trip across Europe lying down in a bunk.
    I have had BPPV for nearly one year without relief. I had done the Epley Maneuver and many exercises but they only offered partial relief. So I am currently waiting to see the physical therapist who will be more likely to have experience treating such cases and get the BPPV physiotherapy treatment from a clinic nearby in Toronto. As far as I have experienced and researched about this physiotherapy is the best treatment for BPPV.

    Leave a comment:


  • Spinningwoman
    replied
    How's it going?

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  • Spinningwoman
    replied
    Originally posted by sukie47 View Post
    Yep, I'm all too familiar with this. Have had it before. Changed my glasses prescription right as it started and it made it way worse. Appt in 2 weeks to deal with it. Thanks
    Poor you. You have my sympathy - it is a horrible sensation.

    Leave a comment:


  • sukie47
    replied
    Yep, I'm all too familiar with this. Have had it before. Changed my glasses prescription right as it started and it made it way worse. Appt in 2 weeks to deal with it. Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Spinningwoman
    replied
    This is the website. It is FDA accredited, I believe. A lot of doctors apparently don't know about it, or didn't when I got it. http://www.dizzyfix.com/
    Last edited by Spinningwoman; 2016-09-29, 06:41 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Spinningwoman
    replied
    If it is actual BPPV, it is caused by some of the little balance crystals in the inner ear getting out of place. The most distinctive feature of BPPV compared to other vertigo is that it hits you lying down, especially when you turn over or turn your head to the side. (It hits you standing up as well but other vertigo types do that too, so the lying down is diagnostic). If it is BPPV there is a head manoever than can fix it by rolling the crystals back into position. Called something like the Eppley manoeuvre?? You have to find a trained practitioner or else use a device called the Dizzyfix that lets you do it at home. It sounds a little flakey and the Dizzyfix is laughable, but it is a genuine treatment and it worked for me first time. I have never had a recurrence. I'll look up the reference. It saved my driving licence and my job when I got BPPV after a long overnight train trip across Europe lying down in a bunk.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bradford
    replied
    Cool! (about the riding) That sucks about the vertigo, sound sensitivity, and weirdness with computer monitors. You've really had a tough time! I have a lot of respect for you not letting all this get you down. I'm not sure I would have dealt with it as well as you have. That's cool, though, that you're OK outside, especially in the evening. Right when the light is fading is my favorite time to ride. It's a little hard to make it back sometimes in the dark, but now I have a light for my helmet that's more than adequate for riding in the dark. I guess dawn is a close second, but I don't always like having to get up that early. Hope you enjoy "real" riding again!

    Leave a comment:


  • sukie47
    replied
    Finally back in the woods

    OK, it's been a long 4 months, in many regards. But, on Sunday, 4 months and 4 days since the broken foot, I got back out to Bent Creek. It was my first real time on the Oracle, aside from a few 50 feet spins just to see if I could still ride.

    I went with a friend. No more solo rides. After almost puking from nerves and fear, I rolled away into the forest. I was really pleased with how well the ride went, and how I felt. Until Sunday, I had been unable to even attempt a free mount d/t weakness and pain in my foot. But, when it came time to dismount and turn around, I had no choice but to try, the tress are too far off the path to be of any assistance. To my utter surprise, I got up in 3 tries.


    Most of my rides these days are on my 20" with my dog. I have been focusing on going back to the basics and building skills instead of just riding and riding, though I do that too. So, Bent Creek will be my weekend rewards for the time being.

    One of the unfortunate consequences of my foot injury has included a really bad case of Vertigo, Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo...brought on by my reapeated ice breaks at work on my back. Something to do with the tilt of my head. I haven't been able to look at a computer screen in weeks, and sounds have been killing me. But for whatever crazy reason, when I am outside, especially in the evenings when the light is fading (the time I can ride) I feel my best.

    Anyway, glad to be back at it. I hope I'll be back on the forum more when I can stand the computer screen for more than a few minutes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bradford
    replied
    Glad to hear you're doing better. I'm sure it feels good to be rid of that boot. You'll be back out there tearin' it up before you know it.

    Hope you're able to make it to STOMP. I'm sure that'll be lots of fun. Hope to hear when you're back on your wheel again!

    Leave a comment:

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