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  • Tips on hopping

    Finally ordered my trial uni.

    A little info: i have been riding for about 5 months i ride a 26 do about 5 miles per session atleast once a week if weather permits. Now that its getting warmer probally more.


    Anyways im looking for saftey tips. Proper jumping landing etc. Any tips would be useful. Im not trying to be a an all out trial person, also not looking to hurt myself too severely as i have to work

    I plan on , hops, 180 spin, backwards and different type of mounts. One leg, no, wheel walk. Real beginner stuff.

    Looking forward to your insight.

  • #2
    Advice: I'm full of it

    Congratulations on your new purchase, Resv!

    Safety gear, in order of importance: wrist-guards, helmet, shoes, shin guards, knee pads, elbow guards.

    It has typically been the case, in my own acquisition of unicycling skills, that any technique I want to learn involves a whole score of other, smaller techniques, in order to accomplish the larger technique. You have to be willing to pat yourself on the back for learning these smaller techniques, or else you will feel frustrated wondering why the big technique seems so impossibly difficult.

    I'll use 180 unispins as an example. Being able to achieve a momentary standstill, prior to doing the spin, is a component skill, and going back another step, idling will help you with stand-stills. I do almost everything technical SIF (seat in front). Getting both hands on the seat is a component skill of unispins. Learning SIF happens in stages: beginners flail their arms wildly, then grab the seat-handle with one hand, then two, then are able to pull the seat out and hold it. Incremental steps. Unispins involve hopping off the pedals, but you probably have to learn to hop 'with' the unicycle, first. My best advice is: practice jump mounting into a SIF position. Start with both hands on the seat, in front of you. Find a grassy area, wear shin guards, and go for it. Don't stop looking at your pedals; your feet will go where your eyes tell them to go. Think about it, you're not jumping that far onto the pedals. Don't expect to be able to ride out of the trick; just get used to jumping; that'll come in handy, later on, when you are attempting unispins.

    You mentioned wanting to learn "beginner" stuff. Maybe, according to serious street/trials/flatland riders, that stuff is "beginner", but when you, instead, look at all the people who've ever attempted to learn unicycle...and consider how far they've gotten, technically, then what you're shooting for is rather advanced. So, work hard, be patient, and take note of all your "small" victories.

    Keep us posted on your progress!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Resv View Post
      Finally ordered my trial uni.

      .
      What did you end up buying? New or used?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
        Congratulations on your new purchase, Resv!

        Safety gear, in order of importance: wrist-guards, helmet, shoes, shin guards, knee pads, elbow guards.

        It has typically been the case, in my own acquisition of unicycling skills, that any technique I want to learn involves a whole score of other, smaller techniques, in order to accomplish the larger technique. You have to be willing to pat yourself on the back for learning these smaller techniques, or else you will feel frustrated wondering why the big technique seems so impossibly difficult.

        I'll use 180 unispins as an example. Being able to achieve a momentary standstill, prior to doing the spin, is a component skill, and going back another step, idling will help you with stand-stills. I do almost everything technical SIF (seat in front). Getting both hands on the seat is a component skill of unispins. Learning SIF happens in stages: beginners flail their arms wildly, then grab the seat-handle with one hand, then two, then are able to pull the seat out and hold it. Incremental steps. Unispins involve hopping off the pedals, but you probably have to learn to hop 'with' the unicycle, first. My best advice is: practice jump mounting into a SIF position. Start with both hands on the seat, in front of you. Find a grassy area, wear shin guards, and go for it. Don't stop looking at your pedals; your feet will go where your eyes tell them to go. Think about it, you're not jumping that far onto the pedals. Don't expect to be able to ride out of the trick; just get used to jumping; that'll come in handy, later on, when you are attempting unispins.

        You mentioned wanting to learn "beginner" stuff. Maybe, according to serious street/trials/flatland riders, that stuff is "beginner", but when you, instead, look at all the people who've ever attempted to learn unicycle...and consider how far they've gotten, technically, then what you're shooting for is rather advanced. So, work hard, be patient, and take note of all your "small" victories.

        Keep us posted on your progress!

        I am grateful for this info. Thank you senpai.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Djphelan01 View Post
          What did you end up buying? New or used?
          Couldnt wait around for a used one at a decent price. Ended up buying a new long neck kh.

          Comment

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