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Any barefoot runners out there?

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  • Any barefoot runners out there?

    Been reading "Born to Run" and learning more about the benefits of barefoot running. Seems like a perfect fit with the minimalist, "don't follow the crowd" nature of unicylists, so I'm wondering if there are any other converts to this philosophy out there. The [ame="http://www.amazon.com/Born-Run-Hidden-Superathletes-Greatest/dp/0307266303"]book[/ame] is mesmerizing.

  • #2
    Originally posted by munimutant View Post
    Been reading "Born to Run" and learning more about the benefits of barefoot running. Seems like a perfect fit with the minimalist, "don't follow the crowd" nature of unicylists,
    I think you're right, and we should all try it for that reason.

    I've just read the reviews. Looks like some interesting ideas.
    My first novel, Bridge of Otherwhere, Michael Wilkinson, on Kindle. A tale of subtle magic, mystery, friendship and love. Tinyurl.com/Bridge-of-Otherwhere For US$ page: TinyURL.com/OtherwhereBridge

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    • #3
      I used to run barefoot quite a bit when I was in my late teens and early twenties. I have not read that book. It came easy to me because I was naturally a mid-foot striker and I ran at lot at the beach and I could pick the part of the wet sand that just had a little give. But soon I was running on grass and pavement barefooted. It teaches you to run very smoothly, almost a gliding style of running and it actually is very easy on the joints because the foot strike has to be very light. Now (at 52) when I run, which is not very often preferring to ride my uni for fitness I wear shoes and have tried to retrain myself to be a heal striker to maximize the cushioning in my shoes. It's easier to run barefooted when you are in shape and have low body fat because running barefooted, at least for me, has a slight braking action from the forefoot strike. So being old and out of shape compared to my youth and I can run longer using a rolling stride starting with a heal strike.

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      • #4
        I own a pair of these O'Neill surf booties that have a rubber sole and are elastic, nearly form-fitting to your feet. I bought them for kayaking and backpacking (water crossings), but thought it may be neat to do trail-running with them, the thing sole protecting from small thorns and splinters.

        Barefoot running, or perhaps bootie running, is something I'd like to experiment with. When I jog, I plant with my heel, but would like to try running, on the balls o my feet, which I naturally do anyway when running (but not jogging).

        I also would like to try, once the soles of my feet toughen up, unicycling in just booties or bare feet.
        Nimbus 29 with Pi bar
        Nimbus 36 with T7
        Koxx-One Domina II

        Live with intention. Walk to the edge.

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        • #5
          I should probably add that I grew up going around barefooted, even riding skateboards barefooted until I got better and started going faster, etc. I grew up playing street games (hide and go seek, etc) barefooted and walking long distances barefooted. So my feet were already very tough before I started running for fitness barefooted.

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          • #6
            My dad runs Ultra Marathons.
            He's done 23 and finished 15.

            He's finished Hardrock a handful of times. He normally does the 100 mile ultra's.
            COLBY
            THOM BROS

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            • #7
              I just went for my first fast hike/run in these. I really enjoyed it, feeling the natural suspension system in my feet being used, which according to what I've been reading, has been suppressed and weakened by cushioned running shoes. I'm looking forward to getting faster with this method. It's probably not for everyone, but I've been dealing with foot pain, orthodics and sprained ankles for many years, and am willing to try anything once to see if it helps.

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              • #8
                I think good running shoes gave me planers fascious(sp)

                I have run on and off for many years with Converse all stars sneakers. They have a rather hard sole, so I decided to treat myself to a pair of 80$ Nike air Pegasus, one of the cushier air running shoes.

                I had to give up running, or for that matter walking. I had a very painful condition, much worse in the morning, where it hurt so much to put weight on my heels I needed crutches. I just assumed I was getting old, I didn't blame the new shoes. Because I wasn't running, I stopped wearing the expensive cushy shoes, and after a while my heels were ok again.

                Then I read a while back that the instability of cushy running shoes was causing more injuries. That started a hard sole running movement.

                So anyway, I started running again with the old converse sneakers and have had no problems. Who would have guessed that 80$ special air running shoes could cause an injury ? Apparently the extra lateral movement that the cushy shoes allow can injure the heel.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by feel the light View Post
                  Apparently the extra lateral movement that the cushy shoes allow can injure the heel.
                  This is similar to what I've heard. In fact, I believe most barefoot runners avoid heelstrike entirely, and land mid-foot, over the arch, which any engineer would confirm is an inherently strong structure. It requires an adjustment to the gait, with the feet hitting earth sooner (more under the body), faster, and lighter. And if you don't have an arch, that might be rectified by going barefoot also. Many people have seen their shoe size actually shrink, because they actually DEVELOP an arch by using the foot muscles as nature intended. I'm just repeating stuff from "Born to Run," I'm not an expert.

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                  • #10
                    Bare Foot

                    Just this, Twice!
                    Attached Files

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                    • #11
                      Yup I love running barefoot.

                      If I am far from where I need to be and am wearing shoes I automatically start to jog.

                      But if I am far from where I need to be and I am barefoot (or wearing 5 fingers) I tend to break into a run.

                      I love running barefoot as it just feels natural and since you don't want to heal strike you naturally just speed up and don't really slow down untill you are out of wind or energy.

                      This summer I did a 8km loop of dirt roads and bush trails barefoot. One stop at a stream to drink water and eat a crap-load of blueberries.


                      I have a pair of Vibram 5 fingers and they are great. They won't protect your feet from real hard impacts (like a moderate drop onto uneven rocks) but are great if you can't take the sticks, stones, and pine-needles of everyday trails. My mom and two of my aunts have gotten the "shoes" since seeing mine and we all love them.

                      they even straitened one of my aunts toes!
                      My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world. - Jack Layton

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                      • #12
                        I tried out some shoes without cushioning and support last year. Running on paved roads in those cured me of heel striking pretty quickly, but it also gave me an over-use injury, so I'm back to ordinary running shoes for now.
                        I'm working on running more as if I was barefoot. If I can get my feet to adjust to that style of running I might try the flat shoes again.
                        What happens on the internet stays on the internet.

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                        • #13
                          Might I mention that out of all the people in that book that run barefoot, none of them run on pavement.
                          The foot is made to naturally run barefoot on pretty much everything other than pavement.
                          I will wait for potter to chime in before saying more.
                          Last edited by habbywall; 2009-11-19, 02:59 PM.
                          Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.

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                          • #14
                            You realise that might take years, right?

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                            • #15
                              In Morris dancing, the heel seldom contacts the floor. It's all on the balls of the feet, using the arch, ankle, calf and knee as the body's natural shock absorbers. I dance mainly outdoors, on a variety of surfaces.

                              A few years ago, for about two seasons, I danced in thin-soled jazz dance shoes. It was great. I felt lighter, more agile, and it was almost like being barefoot. I loved it.

                              Years later, I still limp on bad days because of the damage it did to my feet.
                              My first novel, Bridge of Otherwhere, Michael Wilkinson, on Kindle. A tale of subtle magic, mystery, friendship and love. Tinyurl.com/Bridge-of-Otherwhere For US$ page: TinyURL.com/OtherwhereBridge

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